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Join me in welcoming Joan to the Wednesday re-blog feature. I asked if she could write about her reasons for writing and she excelled in the challenge.

Why I Write.

 


author-writing

Made up words are a delight most of the time, some we use oblivious of their origins as they have been in common usage for centuries. However, others recently added to the dictionary have us shaking our heads. In the links below we have Banana Republic, Beatnik, Bedazzled, Catch-22, Debunk and more.

http://www.theguardian.com/books/2014/nov/19/top-10-words-invented-writers-authorisms

http://www.theguardian.com/books/2014/Jun/17/authors-invented-words-used-every-day-cojones-meme-nerd

What ‘new’ words make you cringe?

Which words are your favorite from the lists above?

Have you ever made up a word for a novel?

I make up names most often, for example my novella is called The Rython Kingdom. The word Rython is a completely new word. I wanted a word that would intrigue and reflect the mythology/fantasy element of the narrative.

Examples -

Chick lit  – Books, usually featuring female characters, written by women on contemporary themes and issues that appeal more to women than to men.

Chillaxing – Blend of chilling and relaxing. Taking a break from stressful activities to rest or relax.

Blook – A blend of book and blog: a book written by a blogger

Prompt logo

 

Today’s prompt – why not share one of your made up words and why you created it OR make one up and its definition.

 


mandyevebarnett:

I was put in the spotlight for NaNo – check out the other NaNoWriMo challengers on Kelworth Files.

Originally posted on The Kelworth Files:

Hello wrimos, friends and followers! We’re nearly a week into November already, can you believe it? Today I’m shining the spotlight on Mandy, whose Nanowrimo profile is mandyb, and has a website at http://mandyevebarnett.com/

What are you writing about this year?
This will be my fifth NaNoWriMo and I am more nervous than previous years as the genre is a new venture for me and I am unsure I can pull it off. This is mostly due to my being a fanatic Stephen King reader! I am not sure the story I am planning is a ‘real’ genre but it is an erotic thriller. The idea came from three real news stories and I merged some of the details into one. My protagonist flees a crime in blind panic, thinking he will return. However, life does not go down that path. I will leave the rest to your imagination…

View original 351 more words


Emotions

In my previous post, I discussed how weather can be an element in our writing but it can also impact us emotionally and physically. In Alberta, my homeland now, the oncoming of winter is dreaded by most. We experience extreme cold, lots of snowfall and limitations on outdoor pursuits. Obviously, some people relish the opportunity to ski, snow board, sled etc. but for others it is a time of indoor pursuits and a hibernation mentality takes over.

As with many emotions, such as anger, depression or an over whelming feeling of love and happiness, they affect our prose or poetry. As writers we learn to use these emotional insights to the benefit of our craft. It gives us an idea how our characters may react to a certain situation and thus breathes life into our stories. Of course when we are in the midst of these feelings they may be too raw to even contemplate using but as with all things time heals.

When you can look back at that emotion look deeply into it and find inspiration – it will strengthen your writing – and also (hopefully) help you resolve and relish it.

How do you find your emotional state affects your writing?

author-writing

 


clipart-weather

No matter where you live low temperatures are unpleasant, however ‘low’ is relative. Low in a normally tropical location maybe a summer’s day heat in others or a dry cold can be ‘warmer’ than a ‘damp’ cold. I spent the majority of my life living in England – the green and pleasant land. However, the ‘green’ was derived from a great deal of rain. I was used to it and never took much notice of the overcast days – it was normal. When I came to live in Canada, however my first ‘surprise’ was the almost constant sunshine. I was not used to it but really loved it. Such a simple change impacted on how I saw the weather as a whole. Now we can have -30 (and yes its cold) but we also have bright blue sky and sunshine at the same time. So the perception is a glorious day until you step outside!

This is our current 10 day trend:

Nov weather

As the global weather patterns change more of us are experiencing unusual weather. This can be warmer winters, colder summers and everything in between. So how do we reflect this kind of change when we are writing a story set in a particular location, where the ‘normal’ view is tropical, arctic or temperate? Do we continue to use the stereo-type perceptions of the location or utilize other ‘clues’ to the region with flora and fauna, style of buildings and accents?

It is a ‘new’ problem for writers, for sure, but with creativity we can overcome.

Have you come across this particular problem in a recent narrative you are writing?

Quotes:

Give me books, fruit, french wine and fine weather and a little music out of doors, played by somebody I do not know.

John Keats

We welcome all enquiries about the UK climate after all, we have more weather available in this country than anywhere else.

Sir Sydney Samuelson

Prompt logo

Prompt

Set your scene in a preconceived location then change it up…


reblog

A first today – a double reblog as both parts are great for inspiration (and our sanity!)

Editing is hard…that is a fact but with some forethought and planning it can be made slightly easier. Decided on which particular edit you want to do – spelling & grammar, continuity, character development etc. then focus on each one separately instead of trying to do it all at once.

One writer I know prints out on different colored paper for each edit category. I utilize a novel workshop run by my local writing group. We pair up and review each others work for several months. Having many eyes read your work assists not only in the usual editing problems but also it is a bet read. A win, win situation.

http://knitewrites.com/2014/09/24/50-ways-editing-will-drive-you-insane-part-1/

http://knitewrites.com/2014/10/01/50-ways-editing-will-drive-you-insane-part-2/

What methods do you use for your editing process?

Which category do you find the hardest?

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editing

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