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mandyevebarnett:

I was put in the spotlight for NaNo – check out the other NaNoWriMo challengers on Kelworth Files.

Originally posted on The Kelworth Files:

Hello wrimos, friends and followers! We’re nearly a week into November already, can you believe it? Today I’m shining the spotlight on Mandy, whose Nanowrimo profile is mandyb, and has a website at http://mandyevebarnett.com/

What are you writing about this year?
This will be my fifth NaNoWriMo and I am more nervous than previous years as the genre is a new venture for me and I am unsure I can pull it off. This is mostly due to my being a fanatic Stephen King reader! I am not sure the story I am planning is a ‘real’ genre but it is an erotic thriller. The idea came from three real news stories and I merged some of the details into one. My protagonist flees a crime in blind panic, thinking he will return. However, life does not go down that path. I will leave the rest to your imagination…

View original 351 more words


Emotions

In my previous post, I discussed how weather can be an element in our writing but it can also impact us emotionally and physically. In Alberta, my homeland now, the oncoming of winter is dreaded by most. We experience extreme cold, lots of snowfall and limitations on outdoor pursuits. Obviously, some people relish the opportunity to ski, snow board, sled etc. but for others it is a time of indoor pursuits and a hibernation mentality takes over.

As with many emotions, such as anger, depression or an over whelming feeling of love and happiness, they affect our prose or poetry. As writers we learn to use these emotional insights to the benefit of our craft. It gives us an idea how our characters may react to a certain situation and thus breathes life into our stories. Of course when we are in the midst of these feelings they may be too raw to even contemplate using but as with all things time heals.

When you can look back at that emotion look deeply into it and find inspiration – it will strengthen your writing – and also (hopefully) help you resolve and relish it.

How do you find your emotional state affects your writing?

author-writing

 


clipart-weather

No matter where you live low temperatures are unpleasant, however ‘low’ is relative. Low in a normally tropical location maybe a summer’s day heat in others or a dry cold can be ‘warmer’ than a ‘damp’ cold. I spent the majority of my life living in England – the green and pleasant land. However, the ‘green’ was derived from a great deal of rain. I was used to it and never took much notice of the overcast days – it was normal. When I came to live in Canada, however my first ‘surprise’ was the almost constant sunshine. I was not used to it but really loved it. Such a simple change impacted on how I saw the weather as a whole. Now we can have -30 (and yes its cold) but we also have bright blue sky and sunshine at the same time. So the perception is a glorious day until you step outside!

This is our current 10 day trend:

Nov weather

As the global weather patterns change more of us are experiencing unusual weather. This can be warmer winters, colder summers and everything in between. So how do we reflect this kind of change when we are writing a story set in a particular location, where the ‘normal’ view is tropical, arctic or temperate? Do we continue to use the stereo-type perceptions of the location or utilize other ‘clues’ to the region with flora and fauna, style of buildings and accents?

It is a ‘new’ problem for writers, for sure, but with creativity we can overcome.

Have you come across this particular problem in a recent narrative you are writing?

Quotes:

Give me books, fruit, french wine and fine weather and a little music out of doors, played by somebody I do not know.

John Keats

We welcome all enquiries about the UK climate after all, we have more weather available in this country than anywhere else.

Sir Sydney Samuelson

Prompt logo

Prompt

Set your scene in a preconceived location then change it up…


reblog

A first today – a double reblog as both parts are great for inspiration (and our sanity!)

Editing is hard…that is a fact but with some forethought and planning it can be made slightly easier. Decided on which particular edit you want to do – spelling & grammar, continuity, character development etc. then focus on each one separately instead of trying to do it all at once.

One writer I know prints out on different colored paper for each edit category. I utilize a novel workshop run by my local writing group. We pair up and review each others work for several months. Having many eyes read your work assists not only in the usual editing problems but also it is a bet read. A win, win situation.

http://knitewrites.com/2014/09/24/50-ways-editing-will-drive-you-insane-part-1/

http://knitewrites.com/2014/10/01/50-ways-editing-will-drive-you-insane-part-2/

What methods do you use for your editing process?

Which category do you find the hardest?

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editing


Overlander sign

My good friend, Linda and I escaped for a wonderful long weekend of writing on Thursday night to Jasper National Park. Our cabin was perfectly situated for us to enjoy peace and quiet. We find it companionable to write together as we share the passion for the written word. Hours may pass and we have not spoken a word, just typed a lot! This mini writing retreat was perfectly timed to give us both much needed time to devote to our respective NaNo novels.

I have many demands on my time with work, volunteering, home and family and so treasure pure writing time. However, Linda has even more demands as she is a publisher (Dream Write Publishing) as well as an author and volunteer and much more! Due to our shared discipline we managed a substantial word count even when we treated ourselves to a trip through the park into Jasper itself on Saturday. We were extremely fortunate to encounter stunning wildlife and the opportunity to refresh our connection to nature.

Elk

Mountain goats

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A browsing session in a couple of souvenir shops gave us gifts and I found a perfect promotional item for my upcoming Western romance, Willow Tree Tears. A figurine of a female barrel racer – my protagonist.

Barrel girl 3

Barrel girl 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We experienced the trip down to Jasper in rain and darkness on Thursday night, bright sunshine and magnificent mountains on Saturday and a large snowfall on Sunday morning greeted us. Each experience was inspiring and special. Returning to our normal routines was difficult – we could have stayed a lot longer but we have our spring writing retreat to look forward to – so let’s start counting the days.

What get-away has given you writing time?

Where do you go?

With whom?

Good luck to my fellow NaNo participants.

 

 


Overlander

This post was created and scheduled ahead of time as I will actually be traveling to Jasper in the Rocky Mountains when it goes live. My friend, Linda and I are going to spend the weekend writing our NaNoWriMo novels surrounded by the magnificence of mountains and spectacular views. Our accommodation is a log walled lodge with a roaring fireplace, perfect for sitting beside with laptop and a glass of wine. As you can see from the photo it is a stunning setting.

We will explore the surrounding area on short walks to refresh mind and body and may do some sightseeing as well – it depends on how the muse is performing. Escaping to indulge in my writing is always a treat and one I rarely (if ever) pass by.

Quotes:

You are not a writer of you do not write. Find the time – even if it’s 500 words, a short story or a paragraph. Novel’s don’t write themselves. Erin Niumata.

Prompt logo

So how about a prompt about escaping to indulge in your writing?

Describe your perfect retreat, space or venue for writing without interruption.


Nano 2014 banner

For those of you who have made the commitment to this mad, exciting, panic inducing challenge – I say good luck, may your muse always be at your shoulder and your words flow smoothly upon your page.

To find those extra minutes in the day to write is tricky to be sure but it is a mind set. Do you have a lunch hour? Can you slip away whilst your family is watching TV? Does it really matter if the slow cooker is the only means of cooking for the month?

I know I become totally possessed during NaNo and write several paragraphs while the meal is cooking, skipping lunch so I can address a characters next move or ignore my eyelids closing as I write into the early hours. This year the challenge began on a weekend, which was an added bonus as well as our clocks went back – whoop an extra hour!  NaNo may seem like a daunting assignment to undertake but there are incredible benefits too. It can be a personal challenge to see how you manage under a deadline, an out pouring of ideas, character development or finally beginning that wished for novel.

Writing to a deadline, for me anyway, results in almost complete novel length stories. These can be revised, added to and edited at my leisure in the following months. Even if you do not manage the fifty thousand word total, you will have laid down enough words to forge ahead with your own narrative. It can be the start you have avoided for months or years.

Knowing there are many, many writers around the world absorbed in the same challenge is not only exciting but a companionship of sorts. The NaNoWriMo site has a buddy system and you can connect with other participants, giving and receiving encouragement and support. Whether you use a pen and notebook or type your story, it is the words that matter.

This month will see thousands of stories created, their characters forging forward and over coming obstacles. Some will be happy, some will be sad but your story will be told.

Enjoy the process, scary as it is – the result is so very rewarding.

cabinMy novel this year is called The Giving Thief, a thriller/suspense/erotic – if there is such a genre!

It is a combination of three true news stories I found fascinating. My protagonist murders someone and flees – for what he believes will be a short time…but things do not go to plan. The photo is similar to how I see his hideout in the mountains.

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