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As a winning participant in NaNoWriMo, we are offered the opportunity of creating proof copies of our November novel. Part of this process is of course deciding on a cover for the book. I created one for my latest narrative, The Giving Thief. I liked the basic design and inserted a photo of a forest cabin. It will give me a good starting point when I design the final cover as I would like more texture in the final image. Once the narrative has been edited and revised I will be able to create a cover to intrigue my readers.

The Giving Thief cover

How did you decide on your proof copy cover?

Was it a generic one or did you design your own?

I found these links, which are really cool. Can you pick one or two?

http://flavorwire.com/206111/the-20-most-iconic-book-covers-ever

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2014/12/08/books/review/best-book-covers-2014.html?_r=0

http://flavorwire.com/322090/the-first-edition-covers-of-25-classic-books

Quote – probably the most famous of all when it comes to a book cover:

Never judge a book by its cover
The external appearance is not a reliable guide to the quality of what lies within.
Prompt logoSo today’s prompt is: Find a cover you enjoy and then describe it.


reblogI know it’s a bit cheeky but I’m re-blogging a short blog piece I wrote for a client today. Restricted to 200 words, I keep them simple but hopefully interesting enough to encourage conversation.

http://www.kelseyincorporated.com/lets-talk.html  – blog tab – Benefits of Buying Local

After submitting the post, I thought about how some local businesses help my publisher, Dream Write Publishing – http://www.dreamwritepublishing.ca/ – in promoting their local authors. Smaller book stores, a volunteer run cafe, an artisan market and a few other general stores assist in stocking the books for sale. The benefit in liaising with the store owners gives each party a deeper understanding of the narratives content as well as the opportunity to meet and greet the authors with signings and the added advantage of an expanded promotion of local events.

Do you have local stores stocking your books? 

What is your experience?

This graph for shop local is a great visual guide to how shopping local benefits the community in which we live.

buying-local-graph


articles

As Christmas gets ever closer the advertising machine goes into overdrive. There are numerous adverts on the television and other outlets for an abundance of toys and gift ideas for all the family. As I do not watch much television, when I happen to catch a stream of adverts I am amazed at the toy choices given. Why, you may ask? Well it is the lack of toys that encourage a child to use their imagination. Everything is themed or a character figurine or a ‘set’ of some kind or other.

lego

I make the comparison with lego – when I was a child lego consisted of various shaped blocks with which you used your imagination to build a plethora of objects. Today lego blocks are in kits, which make a single themed toy. Where is the imagination element? How can a child conjure up fantastical creatures, futuristic vehicles and unique buildings when the blocks limit their creativity?

To be a ‘whole’ person, we need to explore our physical, spiritual and mental capacities, in essence to find what we love, what we are passionate about. If we are limited in that exploration we, and our future generations, will experience a imperfect life. 

Take a simple cardboard box at Christmas it is the focus of young children while their expensive gifts are discarded. Why does a simple box engage so? Well, because it can be ‘anything’ – a tunnel, a car, a house, and much more because their imagination makes it that way. It is limitless in its possibilities.

Let’s look at guarding our imagination and that of our children.

What is your view on imagination and creation?

cardboard box


It is always sad to see established publications, publishing houses and book stores close. The latest to be reported is the Descant literary journal:

omega_logo

 

http://www.thestar.com/entertainment/books/2014/12/11/descant_literary_journal_folds_after_44_years.html

As you can see from this article another stalwart, The Capilano Review is fighting to stay afloat with a kickstarter campaign. Finances are the death toll for many literary organizations struggling in this society we live in, which wants everything ‘instantaneously’. There is no patience nowadays, all too clear with the  ‘we want it and we want it now‘  slogans bantered throughout the media. Gone are the weeks and months of waiting and saving for a particular item or placing it on our wish list.

money

We need to protect the ability to imagine, to create and share the plethora of arts with the world. Fight for your local literary journals, magazines, organizations and groups.

Keep the magic of creativity alive.

 

Quotes

It’s in literature that true life can be found. It’s under the mask of fiction that you can tell the truth.  Gao Xingjian

Every man’s work, whether it be literature, or music or pictures or architecture or anything else, is always a portrait of himself.  Samuel Butler

Prompt logo

 Prompt: 

Share something you created as a child with a simple object, such as a cardboard box.


mandyevebarnett:

reblog

 

Today’s reblog gives rise to thoughts of generational curses. Does your family have a curse?

Originally posted on Nothing Gilded, Nothing Gained--Books & Writing at Middlemay Farm:

Charles Foster my great, great, great grandfather (yes, he was that great) led a drunken life after a childhood of chilling abuse. And here stands his house--a bit drunk looking itself. What a foundation for a family of storytellers.

Charles Foster my great, great, great grandfather (yes, he was that great) suffered a childhood of chilling abuse. And here stands his house. What a foundation for a family of storytellers.

This is our family home. The family that runs in my blood through my mother’s side of the tree. Curses and gifts intermingle, don’t they? When I looked upon this house I knew I was home. I could have stayed for hours listening to the spirits moving the tall grass. I could have stayed for days seeing out of the corner of my eye a young, strong Charles Foster building this house for his mother.

If I’m remembering right, the curse was liquor. Daniel Foster was  a cooper  (barrel- maker) who couldn’t support his family. By the time Charles was six (in 1815) he was sent  off to live and work for others, first a Mr. Clemens–the idea was…

View original 401 more words


As I mentioned on Friday, tomorrow is my writing group’s Christmas party – it is an opportunity to share our current projects, reflect on the past year and reconnect with members who have been away. Part of the celebration is for everyone to read a seasonally themed piece of prose or poem. There are always a variety of interpretations to this prompt, which makes for an interesting evening. My submission this year is:

gift-wrapped-box

The Box

It sat under the Christmas tree tantalizing me

Its shiny wrapping paper and bright gold bow

Perfectly folded corners and sealed up tight

On the label written in script my name

 

As I pass, my eyes fix

Under the decorated Christmas tree

Its lights twinkle and baubles dangle

The box reflected a hundred times

 

When alone I sit beside the box

Smoothing its surface and guessing

The gold ribbon fastened tight

No tears or gaps through which to peek

 

Carefully I pick up the box

Giving it a gentle shake

There is no rattle or jangle

No noise to give a clue

 

The days pass slowly

My impatience grows

When will I be able to open the box

And find out what it holds?

 

Christmas morning arrives

My excitement wakes me at dawn

I creep down the stairs

To find the box gleaming

 

At last the family assembles

I burst with excitement

As the box is handed to me

I feel its weight again and gasp

 

With shaking hands I unwrap

The paper and bow discarded

A cardboard box revealed

No clue given still

 

Prizing open the flaps

Tissue paper rustles

Underneath my Christmas, wish

A perfect treasure for me to keep

 

Prompt logo

Why not share your Christmas themed poem or prose here?


We are in the season of gift buying and receiving, so I thought a few unique ‘writer’ themed gifts were in order.

typewriter-mouse-pad_smallTypewriter mouse mat.

water notesWaterproof notepads. When that idea strikes.

PotionFor when the idea doesn’t strike!

stick-up-calendarSticky word count count calendar

typewriter pendentTypewriter locket

I will be shopping for a secret Santa gift this weekend for my writing group’s Xmas party on Tuesday. We have a pot luck, gift exchange and read Christmas themed prose or poetry. I made an extra effort last year and made miniature cupcakes with punctuation marks on them. They certainly went down well. This year my pot luck will not be so labor intensive.

punctuation cupcakes

My poem from last year:

CHRISTMAS FAIRY

 Christmas_Fairy_

Snowflakes drift slowly downward

Sunlight shining through their intricate patterns

Layer upon layer, centimeter by centimeter

Gathering together to cover the world

 A blanket of whiteness so pure

 

A movement, a flicker beside my eye

The delicate whisper of wings passing by

A tiny glittering, sparkling shape

The Christmas Fairy gently laughing

A tinkling sound so light

 

She flits back and forth between the flakes

Fluttering her eyelashes, she can make

Their pointed star shape rotate

As the snow flakes dance in the air again

This is her element. This is her time

What does your group do for the season’s celebrations?

Prompt logo Today’s prompt is: Write what your perfect writing themed party would be like – no holds barred!

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