Feeds:
Posts
Comments

halloween2Halloween means that the internet is awash with spooky costumes, books and trick or treat candy. For many it is a fun filled evening to enjoy scaring each other on doorsteps or at themed parties. However, for others it manifests differently as a real fear of what the evening portrays. Samhainophobia is actually a phobia of Halloween. Sufferers have an intense and persistent fear of Halloween, and the condition causes panic attacks in people who suffer from it. They have a morbid fear of Halloween, in essence the sense of wildness and otherworldliness that the night seems to conjure forth. It is most common in devout religious believers. Other related fears include Wiccaphobia : fear of witches, Phasmophobia : fear of ghosts and Coimetrophobia : a fear of cemeteries.

Although, to date, I have not seen a witch (at least not the commonly used image),  I have seen a ghost. As for cemeteries; you will think me strange for this but what the heck – I used to spend a lot of time alone in cemeteries as a child. One was near my childhood home and surrounded a small chapel. My favorite spot to sit and enjoy quiet time was under a willow tree next to a baby’s grave. Weird I know! I just found it very peaceful. The other cemetery, I frequented was at a derelict church and I spent a lot of  time cleaning the moss and dirt out of the gravestones. Yep, I’m weird and now you don’t have to wonder why I love Stephen King!

Do you have a ‘creepy’ secret or experience you can share?

Now for a shameless plug – why not buy my children’s story – Rumble’s First Scare? You know you want to – he’s such a cute little monster.

http://www.dreamwritepublishing.ca/retail/books/rumbles-first-scare

Rumble

WOTS Sept 2014

Prompt logo

 

 

 

Why not write a short scary prompt today?

 


reblog

Today’s re-blog comes from Ryan Lanz at A Writer’s Path.

Enjoy this great post on plotting.

http://ryanlanz.com/2014/08/05/styles-of-plotting/

 

 


Man Sitting In ValleyWe all have different coping mechanisms when it comes to changes in our lives. Some changes are welcome, some raising curiosity while others are certainly not wanted or wished for. I experienced two smaller occurrences in the last couple of days and it began a line of thought I wanted to share. Do I resist change or embrace it?

As some of you will know I attended Words in the Park over the weekend. The hall was full of forty nine authors and nine vendors – all displaying books and accessories for the discerning book lover. In past years, I have been positioned close to my publisher, Dream Write Publishing and my writing group, The Writers Foundation of Strathcona County. This has led to an enjoyable time overseeing these tables in rotation with others and conversing and chatting with friends and visitors alike. This year as I had booked a whole table instead of half, I was placed on the other side of the venue, away from my usual comrades. It may seem childish (especially considering my age!) but I felt excluded at first. I could see them talking and laughing but unable to join in. Then I realized that I should take advantage of the opportunity and be more proactive in my promotion rather than await passers-by. I surveyed my display and knew it was eye-catching so stood behind my table and greeted everyone, stating the age groups for each book and a short description of the stories. It was a successful day for sales and I also received lots of compliments on my table arrangement and each individual book’s themed items. Several friends did stop by for a chat and one looked after my table while I went to participate in an author reading. All in all I feel I made more sales because I was more engaged and not distracted to my goal.

Today was a day of change as well at my workplace. After nearly two years, my manager and I have a new work colleague. We have been comfortable in how we arrange our work days and the day to day routine is pretty much set. The new employee will bring her own ideas of regime and structure and it is probably not a bad thing. We can all get stuck in a rut so easily. We will embrace this change and see what it brings in the months to come.

What changes have you experienced lately that made you leave your comfort zone?

Was the outcome successful?

What did you learn from the experience?

changes_roadsign

 


WITP Oct

The event Words in the Park in Sherwood Park, AB (http://words.sclibrary.ab.ca/) is celebrating it’s seventh year. As the secretary of the co-host, The Writers Foundation of Strathcona County and a local author, this event is the highlight of my year.

This year I am officially launching my second children’s book, Ockleberries to the Rescue. http://www.dreamwritepublishing.ca/products/ockleberries-rescue

 

Book cover

There is a lot of pre-planning for any event of course and as the event date grows closer there are lots of things requiring attention. I spent several hours on Tuesday evening with other WFSC members, putting out numerous signs for the event around the local area. Then last night it was my friend, Linda and I, busily putting labels on 100+ water bottles and packing up several boxes of books for all her authors (45 books in all) ready for display on Saturday 25th October – 12.00 – 4pm.

All the organizers, including me, will be setting up the tables and displays early on Saturday morning. I practiced my table display several weeks ago and have all my supplies packed and ready to go. Yes, I’m that organized! This is my practice run photo:

WITP 2014 set upOn the left is my adult fantasy, The Rython Kingdom with bookmarks and glowing globe. In the middle is my soft toy, Rumble with his book, Rumble’s First Scare and T-shirts and hats (I have printed out coloring pages too). On the right is Ockleberries to the Rescue with wooden door ornament and forest animal figurines (2 glow!) Hopefully it will attract attention.

I also have a reading on the day at 1 pm so will relate a chapter of my forest sprite adventures in Ockleberries to the Rescue.

When you have an event, how do you plan your display?

Rumble3d3df1f7d1f382285315cbfd851c3329b33bce46


mandyevebarnett:

reblog

Today’s re-blog comes from Ryan Lanz at A Writer’s Path.
Enjoy this great post on plotting.

Originally posted on A Writer's Path:

watering-can-342553_640

Has anyone ever told you that you have an architect or gardener style of plotting?

There are all sorts of names for styles of plotting. Another set is pantser/plotter, although those terms never seemed to feel right for me. Both styles have various pros and cons, neither being right or wrong. Each method also has certain strengths and weaknesses, which we’ll go over later in this post.

So which are you? Let’s dive in.

View original 737 more words


articlesWithin the multitude of genres in fiction, there are constraints on what is and what is not ‘allowed’ in terms of content or style based on the genre’s ‘main’ heading. See here:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_literary_genres

This link is helpful when defining the genre:

http://querytracker.blogspot.ca/2009/04/defining-genres-where-does-your-book.html

As most of you know I am a free flow writer so my story comes first and the defining comes much later. For many authors this pigeon holing our work is difficult and this fact is reflected in the sub-genres that are being created almost daily. We can also use a technique where by we utilize several ‘genre headings’ in our description. Such as the list here: https://www.worldswithoutend.com/resources_sub-genres.asp , which only deals with fantasy and sci-fi. So there is a method open to us to use our genre description as a way to entice more than one ‘type’ of reader.  Romance readers would never go to the horror section first but if the description was something like – romantic suspense – then maybe they would pick up your book.

It is a matter of looking at your story and defining the main theme, even if it is underlining thread throughout the narrative. My novella, The Rython Kingdom is set in medieval England so is part historical, there is a love element, so I can add romance but there is also a malevolent witch plotting to kill, so do I add suspense, horror or adventure as well?

Children’s books are easier to promote – a short description of the story is normally enough. Rumble’s First Scare follows a young monster on his first Halloween adventure, while Ockleberries to the Rescue is the story of woodland sprites aiding their forest animals friends.

My current WIP is easier to define – a western romance, Willow Tree Tears is the story of a barrel racer deciding whether to love an old friend or a charming stranger. I will be entering the NaNoWriMo challenge this November and have decided on a new genre – thriller/suspense. The Giving Thief is inspired by three true to life news stories.

How did you decide on your novel’s genre?

When you are defining your novels, what methods do you use to decide on its ‘genre’? Do you write one or more genre’s?

Do you decide to write specifically to a particular genre prior to starting a new manuscript?

book-genre


There are many classic novels we remember from childhood or young adulthood, one of these for me is Cider with Rosie by Laurie Lee. The BBC (UK’s broadcasting company) are making a series of dramas, which will bring to life many classics, including Cider with Rosie, The Go-Between and Lady Chatterley’s Lover.

CiderWithRosie

 

http://www.kidderminstershuttle.co.uk/leisure/national/11533900.Cider_With_Rosie_role_for_Morton/

I can still see in my mind’s eye how I envisioned the characters in these books. Some imaginary characters are so instilled and real that to have an actor play them can be disappointing. Obviously, some chosen actors are so perfect there is no problem alas this is not always the case. We all know some are chosen for their book office popularity rather than their resemblance to a particular character. Daniel Radcliffe will always be Harry Potter for generations of people (not good for his future career of course but we watched him grow up on the screen). We cannot contemplate anyone else as Harry or indeed any of his faithful companions or enemies.To be so immersed in a character is excellent for the reader but also a tribute to the author for creating such a realistic personality. As you can see from Stephen’s quote further down this post Pennywise from It was ‘perfect’ – I still fear clowns to this day!

Which actor was ‘perfect’ and which was ‘awful’ for your favorite book’s movie or TV adaptation?

For me The Shining movie, adapted from Stephen King’s novel, was completely ruined by Shelley Duvall, she was not believable in any part of the movie, however, Jack Nicholson was magnificent.

Shiningnovel

Do you have an actor in mind for your own novel(s)? Who are they playing and why did you chose them?

Quotes:

“When people talk about the stuff of mine that’s frightened them onscreen, they’re apt to mention Pennywise the Clown first.” – IT, Stephen King

“I may be the first writer in America to have a piece of writing make its way to the screen whole and entire. And, when I saw the film for the first time, I was astonished that the characters of Jack and Ennis came surging into my mind again.” – Brokeback Mountain- Annie Proulx

 

FunDay

Today’s prompt – Describe your novel’s character and match them with a real actor.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 2,535 other followers