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mandyevebarnett:

reblog

Today’s re-blog comes from Ryan Lanz at A Writer’s Path.
Enjoy this great post on plotting.

Originally posted on A Writer's Path:

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Has anyone ever told you that you have an architect or gardener style of plotting?

There are all sorts of names for styles of plotting. Another set is pantser/plotter, although those terms never seemed to feel right for me. Both styles have various pros and cons, neither being right or wrong. Each method also has certain strengths and weaknesses, which we’ll go over later in this post.

So which are you? Let’s dive in.

View original 737 more words


articlesWithin the multitude of genres in fiction, there are constraints on what is and what is not ‘allowed’ in terms of content or style based on the genre’s ‘main’ heading. See here:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_literary_genres

This link is helpful when defining the genre:

http://querytracker.blogspot.ca/2009/04/defining-genres-where-does-your-book.html

As most of you know I am a free flow writer so my story comes first and the defining comes much later. For many authors this pigeon holing our work is difficult and this fact is reflected in the sub-genres that are being created almost daily. We can also use a technique where by we utilize several ‘genre headings’ in our description. Such as the list here: https://www.worldswithoutend.com/resources_sub-genres.asp , which only deals with fantasy and sci-fi. So there is a method open to us to use our genre description as a way to entice more than one ‘type’ of reader.  Romance readers would never go to the horror section first but if the description was something like – romantic suspense – then maybe they would pick up your book.

It is a matter of looking at your story and defining the main theme, even if it is underlining thread throughout the narrative. My novella, The Rython Kingdom is set in medieval England so is part historical, there is a love element, so I can add romance but there is also a malevolent witch plotting to kill, so do I add suspense, horror or adventure as well?

Children’s books are easier to promote – a short description of the story is normally enough. Rumble’s First Scare follows a young monster on his first Halloween adventure, while Ockleberries to the Rescue is the story of woodland sprites aiding their forest animals friends.

My current WIP is easier to define – a western romance, Willow Tree Tears is the story of a barrel racer deciding whether to love an old friend or a charming stranger. I will be entering the NaNoWriMo challenge this November and have decided on a new genre – thriller/suspense. The Giving Thief is inspired by three true to life news stories.

How did you decide on your novel’s genre?

When you are defining your novels, what methods do you use to decide on its ‘genre’? Do you write one or more genre’s?

Do you decide to write specifically to a particular genre prior to starting a new manuscript?

book-genre


There are many classic novels we remember from childhood or young adulthood, one of these for me is Cider with Rosie by Laurie Lee. The BBC (UK’s broadcasting company) are making a series of dramas, which will bring to life many classics, including Cider with Rosie, The Go-Between and Lady Chatterley’s Lover.

CiderWithRosie

 

http://www.kidderminstershuttle.co.uk/leisure/national/11533900.Cider_With_Rosie_role_for_Morton/

I can still see in my mind’s eye how I envisioned the characters in these books. Some imaginary characters are so instilled and real that to have an actor play them can be disappointing. Obviously, some chosen actors are so perfect there is no problem alas this is not always the case. We all know some are chosen for their book office popularity rather than their resemblance to a particular character. Daniel Radcliffe will always be Harry Potter for generations of people (not good for his future career of course but we watched him grow up on the screen). We cannot contemplate anyone else as Harry or indeed any of his faithful companions or enemies.To be so immersed in a character is excellent for the reader but also a tribute to the author for creating such a realistic personality. As you can see from Stephen’s quote further down this post Pennywise from It was ‘perfect’ – I still fear clowns to this day!

Which actor was ‘perfect’ and which was ‘awful’ for your favorite book’s movie or TV adaptation?

For me The Shining movie, adapted from Stephen King’s novel, was completely ruined by Shelley Duvall, she was not believable in any part of the movie, however, Jack Nicholson was magnificent.

Shiningnovel

Do you have an actor in mind for your own novel(s)? Who are they playing and why did you chose them?

Quotes:

“When people talk about the stuff of mine that’s frightened them onscreen, they’re apt to mention Pennywise the Clown first.” – IT, Stephen King

“I may be the first writer in America to have a piece of writing make its way to the screen whole and entire. And, when I saw the film for the first time, I was astonished that the characters of Jack and Ennis came surging into my mind again.” – Brokeback Mountain- Annie Proulx

 

FunDay

Today’s prompt – Describe your novel’s character and match them with a real actor.


Please welcome Elaine Spencer – Elaine Spenceran author of historical fiction.

1. What do you enjoy most about writing?
As a writer of fiction, I enjoy escaping to a make believe world where I am in control.  I also like that I’m constantly learning in a way that I enjoy.
2. What age did you start writing stories/poems?
I started getting into writing as a form of self-expression and healing when I was in high school.  It began as journaling then, as I learned more about myself and the world, ideas just started to grow.

3. Has your genre changed or stayed the same?

It has changed from writing for myself to writing for others in a more technical form to writing historical fiction for pleasure, which is what I enjoy most.

4. What genre are you currently reading?

Historical fiction and biographies.

5. Do you read for pleasure or research or both?

Although most of my reading these days is for research, I love reading just for pleasure.  There’s nothing like going on a mini vacation from daily life by getting lost in a good story.

6. Who is your best supporter/mentor/encourager?

I have a wonderful list of family and friends who support and encourage but my husband and sister are definitely at the top.
7. Of the characters you have created or envisioned, which is your favorite & why?

There is a lot of myself in the character of Charlotte Logan (Charlie) but one of my favorite characters is Percival Meade because he starts out snooty, annoying and with many flaws but turns out to be likeable and a little more humble while staying true to who he is.

 8. Where is your favorite writing space?

I have a home office with everything I need including a writing desk and comfortable reading corner.

desk

9. Do you plan your stories, or are you a seat of the pants writer?
I create a basic outline where I decide on the setting, plot, main characters and so forth.  Once the writing process actually begins, changes develop, new characters step in and the story unfolds.

10. What inspires your ideas/stories?
Inspiration is all around but we have to go looking for it.  Books, music, news, observing people, traveling, nature, personal experiences and good old imagination are some of the places where I find inspiration.

11. Do you belong to a writing group? If so which one?

I joined a local group but found that with an outside job, research, and writing, I couldn’t commit to a scheduled time so found an online source that suits my needs and allows more flexibility to share and critique with other writers, access workshops and participate in forums.
12. If you could meet one favorite author, who would it be and why?
There are so many writers to learn from and even more I’ve never read but I love the way authors like John Steinbeck have mastered their use of description, dialogue, and creating believable characters.
13. Do you have a book(s) published? If so, what is it called & where can readers purchase it?
Freedom Reins is a historical fiction available through a variety of sources including Amazon, friesenpress.com, and itunes.

Freedom Reins

14. Where can readers find you and your blog?

My website is http://www.e-spencer.com
15. Do you have plans or ideas for your next book?
I’m currently researching and have begun some writing for another historical fiction.

Thank you Elaine for the insight into your writing journey.


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We all struggle to promote our work and turn to the numerous social media sites as avenues of interaction. We can spend hours posting book links, reviews, book cover art, links to our blog etc. When it comes to determining the success of all this activity, we can feel despondent. A tweet is lost in a multitude of other tweets within seconds, a face book page post may last slightly longer but its place is taken once the feed renews. Now you may feel such random and spasmodic promotion does little to help you become known but take heart in the fact that these efforts are not in vain. Re-tweets and shares are confirmation that someone has seen your post and it spreads to other media sites in the process.

There are analytic pages for most media sites, where you are able to track the success of a particular promotion. You can focus on specific groups or locations as well, giving your promotion an advantage and ensuring the ‘right’ people view the information you supply. I utilize all the usual social media sites but have to confess I am not an everyday user so ‘miss’ whole days or even weeks of potential promotional opportunities.

co-promote

That is why I was so thrilled to find a site called Co-Promote last year. At the time most of the users were involved in the music business. Once I read how the site worked I was intrigued but thought there was no room for authors. I wrote an email asking if they would be expanding their reach to other enterprises. The reply was quick and favorable. Anyone was welcome to join no matter what their trade, business or creative genre. I was informed new options would be added for books, magazines and blogs. Encouraged by this willingness to accommodate, I joined up and have found this site to be excellent. You can join for free or register for a sliding scale of options.  More here: https://copromote.com/about.php  The added bonus is that whenever there is a share you are sent an email advising you of who has shared. Each email also shows you new shares, new engagements and the reach of your promotion has achieved. Each promotion can be run for a few days or a few weeks, whichever is preferable to your requirements. My current promotion began on 12th October – so far it has reached 27.5K  people! I could not have done that with any other site in such a short time.

What promotional sites do you use?

Which is the most successful for you?

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I read this article concerning ‘lost’ stories from Truman Capote with interest.   http://www.nytimes.com/2014/10/09/books/lost-stories-by-capote-are-published.html?_r=0
Truman_Capote

I wonder how many other authors or poets have work stuffed into the back of drawers, filed away in dusty archives or were discarded into the garbage? As modern writers we have the ability to store our writing on memory sticks or within computer files. They can be recovered (or not) at our leisure or wiped clean if we feel the compulsion to do so.

Would you want your work to be ‘discovered’ at a later date?

Would it reflect your current writing style or be completely different?

I have a couple of novels saved on my hard drive that were my initial foray into this writing life. My experience and skill has increased since and I know that they would need a lot of editing to bring them up to par. I return to them from time to time and ponder re-writing them so cannot delete them. They show me how far I have come and for that they are precious. Maybe one day they will see the light of day and be published. I just need to get all the other projects bouncing around inside my head on paper first!

Have you re-written a project?

What did you learn from the experience?

Quotes

You write to communicate to the hearts and minds of others what’s burning inside you, and we edit to let the fire show through the smoke.” – Arthur Plotnik

You become a good writer just as you become a good joiner: by planing down your sentences. ~  Anatole France

Today’s prompt : Re-write the first line of your first story.FunDay

Share it here with the original.

Excerpt from Willow Tree Tears – WIP: Name changes and setting described:

Original: Willow rode past Shanna Deeks into the rodeo arena. I’m goin’ to beat you, bitch. You might have stolen Ryan from me but you’re not getting’ this championship.

Revision: Madison rode toward the rodeo arena entrance, shifting in her saddle to ensure Amber Fire’s girth was tight as she weaved through the crowd of people and horses, attending the year’s final rodeo.

Asking A Favor…


Hello All,

Would you please read my story submission on Canada Writes? The title is Creative Promise Achieved.

http://www.cbc.ca/books/canadawrites/2014/10/stories-of-belonging.html#mid=20534467&offset=2&page=&s=

belongingCanada Writes

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