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mandyevebarnett:

I was intrigued with this blog concerning community. We have our local community but also through the world wide web an extended one. What are your views?
I enjoy connecting with people, whether locally or globally, without making the effort to connect we become isolated.

Originally posted on Robin Mazumder:

What is community?

Merriam Webster defines community as

: a group of people who live in the same area (such as a city, town, or neighborhood)

: a group of people who have the same interests, religion, race, etc.

: a group of nations

As you can see, the definition isn’t particularly clear.

8527885667_3f6500d0c3_zI’ve been mulling over this question for some time now. The word “community” is thrown around quite a bit, but I’m not sure we really understand what we mean when we use it.  I’ve often referred to myself as a community builder. I teach in the Faculty of Health and Community Studies. I work on a mental health team in Edmonton called the Community Outreach Assessment and Support Team. Earlier this year I attended the Canadian Association of Occupational Therapists National Conference in Fredericton, where the focus was on “Enabling Healthy Communities”. At the conference we…

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I was interviewed regarding my experiences with book marketing and today the post went live. Take a look :http://www.calamusworks.com/author-interview-series-mandy-eve-barnett/

MandyEveBarnettBanner

 

What has been your experience in marketing your novels?

What did you find to be the most successful? 

What was the least successful?

Join in the conversation and help fellow writers.

 


For many of us Enid Blyton will be a reminder of our childhood. Reading the adventures of the Famous Five and imaging ourselves in those situations, caused delight and adventure at bedtime. I read today that there are plans to make a Famous Five movie. See link:

http://www.theguardian.com/books/2014/jul/25/enid-blyton-famous-five-big-screen-adventure

enid-blyton

It is a bold idea when most children nowadays are more interested in technological heroes, machines and violence. It will be interesting to see what sort of adaptation is produced. What are your thoughts on it?

Which childhood book (or books) would you enjoy watching as  a movie?

I love Stig of the Dump, as I can imagine a caveman trying to come to terms with modern day technology and how we ‘buy’ everything instead of making it or fashioning useful articles from whatever we can find.

FunDay

Today’s fun prompt is – How would you adapt your favorite childhood hero into a movie?


mandyevebarnett:

A great post on finding your blog’s audience. What are your tips for attracting readers?

Originally posted on The Daily Post:

We spend a lot of time discussing ways to use social networks like Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, and Instagram to grow your blog’s audience. Forums are another effective tool for increasing your readership: these niche social networks are a focused way for bloggers who publish on specific topics to connect, boost their blogs, and find new post inspiration.

Finding your people

Sadly, the needle is not always so easy to find -- but forums and niche communities can go a long way toward shrinking your virtual haystack. "Needle in a Haystack," James Lumb .

Sadly, the needle is not always so easy to find — but forums and niche communities can go a long way toward shrinking your online haystack.
Needle in a Haystack,” James Lumb.

Finding people on the internet is the easy part. Finding the people you want to connect with — the people who care about the same things, or share your values — is another matter entirely. Many new bloggers feel alone despite joining a community millions strong, because simply participating doesn’t mean you’re connecting.

There are many ways to…

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What is your motivation for writing?

Let’s look at each scenario:

money

a) Money – we would all love to be a best seller and have fame and fortune like the ‘big’ names, such as Stephen King, J.K. Rowling and the like. However, we need to be realistic – firstly can we manage to get a publishing contract with a big publishing house? How many years are you willing to wait for that? If you use the self-publishing route how much of your time (unpaid) can you sacrifice for promotion? Should you give your work away?

These links will give you an idea of the practicalities of writing with monetary visions foremost:

http://publishingperspectives.com/2014/01/how-much-do-writers-earn-less-than-you-think/

http://www.helpingwritersbecomeauthors.com/2008/11/validation-of-money.html

success

b) Success – once again we should temper our expectations. Global sales are a dream we want to make real but maybe measure our success on more of a local level. Do you have your books in local bookstores, the library, offered at local events? The more you attend and promote within your own locality the more your ‘success’ becomes tangible. Articles in the local newspaper could have people approach or question you in regard to your being an author. Social media allows us to expand our locality, of course, but starting small will give us a firm basis from which to start. Never under estimate the power of word of mouth for promotion.

This link has a list of concepts:

http://www.thecreativepenn.com/2014/03/01/definition-of-success/

satisfaction-

c) Satisfaction – Although this is third on the list, I feel it is the most important of all, as having your words, ideas and stories readily available for people to read now and for future generations, is the penultimate success. Our narratives will be enjoyed and relayed long after we are gone. It is our legacy.

A tongue in cheek link:

http://magicalmusings.com/2006/03/27/10-advantages-of-being-a-writer/

Obviously, a mixture of all three of the above would be the perfect scenario.

What do you consider the most satisfying part of being a writer/author?


hammock

Let’s plan to do something fun this weekend, whether you seclude yourself with notepad and pen, grab a favorite or new novel or find an exciting event to share with family and friends, take advantage of the summer weather. I plan to continue editing and revising my cowgirl romance, Willow Tree Tears, enjoy walks with two dogs I am looking after and make a couple of new recipes.

What are your plans for this weekend?

hedgerow

Why not use this prompt to start a new story? Alisha kicked at the box, half hidden under the hedge. She didn’t expect what came out of it…. Share your creation in the comments.

This is a particularly fun event. http://www.standard.co.uk/showbiz/philip-pullman-prepares-grimm-burial-in-east-end-9092572.html

And a historical event for China: http://english.cntv.cn/2014/07/17/VIDE1405597441880213.shtml


reblogApologies for missing this re-blog yesterday – crisis required attention!

Please see the attached link for the original

http://thewritelife.com/cliches-avoid-4-story-endings-readers-will-hate/

I have placed the post here:

Writing a book is difficult, but crafting an ending that is both impactful and wraps the plot up beautifully is even more so.

You worked hard to create a beginning that grabbed your readers, so make sure to write an ending that lives up to the rest of your story. Relying on clichés will only leave your readers feeling disappointed and dissatisfied.

Stay away from these four cliché endings:

1. The happily ever after

What it is: All of the characters in your book live happily ever, with no hardships to bear. The hero defeats his foes and all of the plot twists are nicely tied up – perhaps a little unrealistically.

Why to avoid it: Life doesn’t necessarily end happily ever after, which makes this type of ending feel disingenuous. You want your readers to feel enthralled with your book so that they’ll want to share it with friends, read more of your work or even re-read your story. Real life isn’t perfect, so make sure that your book stays in the realm of realism.

2. The drawn-out dream

What it is: The drawn-out dream ending involves the main character waking up safe and sound in their bed, realizing that the entire plot has just been a dream.

Why to avoid it: This type of ending typically annoys readers, who feel that the author has copped out. A book should be emotional to everyone involved, and an author who uses this ending seems to betray readers’ trust and cheapen the emotions they’ve felt throughout the book.

3. The guilty hero’s monologue

What it is: When the hero finally defeats the bad guy or force, the reader is privy to her internal thoughts of regret or remorse. The monologue is supposed to show the character’s guilt at what she’s had to do and how it’s eating away at her. Even though the ending is happy, our hero must now live with the blood on her hands.

Why to avoid it: In general, writers should strive to show, not tell, readers what is happening in the book. By strongarming readers into feeling specific, manufactured emotions, you are taking away their freedom to experience the story in a way that is reflective of their background and experiences. Readers may feel they are being led to specific conclusions, and few enjoy the feeling of an author holding their hand throughout a book — especially the ending.

4. The lover’s life

What it is: This is a special twist on the happily ever after ending, in which the main character falls in love, sometimes for an unexplained or random reason. It shows that true love makes the world go ‘round and that all that happened in the course of the story was worth it.

Why to avoid it: Unrealistic endings tend to annoy readers. If a love interest is too sudden, it isn’t all that real. If it is unexplained, it leaves your characters lacking depth. The truth is that not everyone falls in love and lives happily ever after. The best endings are unique, somewhat realistic, and really make your readers think.

Thank you to Allison VanNest for allowing me to share this insightful post with you all.

Have you ever rewrote a novel’s ending? Care to share?

My alternate ending to Life in Slake Patch was due to persuasion from my writing group members. The original left my protagonist awaiting a trial’s outcome. The revision gave my readers a verdict.

 

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