Category Archives: family

Upcoming Writing Events- Add Yours for your Location…


events

 

This week’s events for me are mostly Board meetings. The first is tomorrow – Writers Foundation meeting where we will be planning our annual conference among other things. The conference is a major event for the foundation and we are always delighted to welcome prestige presenters. The event is open to members and non-members and is always an enjoyable and informative day.

Writers Foundation Strathcona CountyWeb ACCSC Logo

On Wednesday I will be chair for the Arts & Culture Council board meeting and again there will be planning to commence for our 150 year Canada celebration in the summer.

Both boards enable me to indulge in the arts and spread the word in and around our locality.

Do you belong to a board? How does it help you and your community?

Gallery 501, Sherwood Park – Exhibit

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“Canadianisms: A Half Decade Inspired by Canada” by Brandy Saturley

January 6 – Feburary 26, 2017
Saturley paints Canadian Contemporary Realism. Making art for over thirty years, and painting in acrylics for fifteen. Saturley gained national attention with her paintings inspired by Canadian culture and sport including goalie masks, Canadian athletes, the Canadian flag, the Montreal Canadiens, Alberta Rockies, and Canadian wildlife.

Other writing events:

The Galiano Island Literary Festival, which will kick the new season February 17–19 with authors including Gail Anderson-Dargatz, Carmen Aguirre, Janie Chang, Anosh Irani, Jennifer Manuel, Heather O’Neill, Bev Sellars, and Yasuko Thanh.

Please share your local writing events here.

Interview with Dorothy M. Neddermeyer – Regression Therapist…


quantum-theory

My good friend, Mandy Eve-Barnett, asked me a couple of weeks ago to write a little something on reincarnation. I asked her to provide me with a guideline as this subject could easily be interminable, and she did.

Now, before I go ahead and give you the question and answer period, I want to admit that I have been a vocal proponent of reincarnation for many years. In fact, I was fourteen when I began to question the wisdom around me and consider this possibility. Since, well, let’s just say I have found supporters in many corners of the world, and by acting like the doubting Thomas my father always preached I should be to get to the truth, information began to flow and I began supporting the reincarnation premise even faster. Since, then, I have also come across a few of my past lives in what I call lucid dreaming, and in flashback bits of memory when encountering people who are very familiar to me, or when traveling to places that have spawned memories so vivid, I could not discount the souvenirs. All this information has, of course, strengthened my belief in reincarnation.

Furthermore, for all you enthusiasts who would like to find out more, you can touch base with the writings of Edgar Cayce who was the first sleeping prophet I consulted. His books on the subject provide extensive verification of the matter.

Another theorist on the issue for those of you who wish to make a more thorough investigation in the world of incarnation, you may consult Helen Wambach who worked in this field a long time and has documented many such occurrences using a scientific approach. She has many video interviews on the subject accessible through Internet.

Last but certainly not least, I thought who best to consult on this matter than a friend, Dr. Dorothy Neddermeyer who found interest in this topic as early as 1954 and has embraced her mission with dedication, education, and a vast experience in working in the field most of her life. For the purpose of this interview, Mandy and I (Joss Landry) have submitted a few questions to Dr. Neddermeyer, and here are some of her notable answers. Please note that Dr. Neddermeyer is available for a past life regression consultation through the Genesis foundation: http://drdorothy.info

1. Tell us about your qualifications? and (together with number 2) Master’s Degree in Clinical Social Work, Ph.D. in Philosophy Major: Metaphysics.
Certified NLP/Ericksonian Hypnosis Practitioner Certified: Past Life Regression Practitioner 30+ years experience. Past President International Association for Regression Therapists .

2. How you became interested in past life regression? At age 7, I received a message that I would have a significant impact in people’s lives. I learned about Past Life Regression work reading about Virginia Mae Morrow, the Colorado woman whose hypnosis-induced recollections of Bridey Murphy was first told in articles by William J. Barker in The Denver Post in 1954 . I was 12 years old

3. Have you encountered unusual past life stories? Having facilitated hundreds of Past Life Regressions many interesting past life juxtapositions have been uncovered. People from other planets? Yes

4. Are birthmarks signs of injury from a past life? Yes, birthmarks and other physical abnormalities and illness are often from a past life. The past life can be accessed and the trauma that has been carried into the current life can be processed and released.

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5. What aspects of a person’s past life might carry over to their new incarnation? All issues–mental/emotional, physical and spiritual that the person came to resolve in this life time.

6. Do you feel introverted people are a sign that they are holding on to a past life? It can be a sign, but is not considered an absolute indication of a past life.
Are they easier subjects for hypnosis? There is no research that I am aware of that posits introverts go into a trance easier than others.

7. How can you identify a soul you’ve met before?

• A strong attraction or aversion to a person — There are three types of soul mates.
• Overwhelming emotions when meeting.
• You click immediately/quickly.
• A sense of having known the person before.
• You read each other like a book. You have many things in common.
• Time seems to stand still when you are together.
• You have a strong connection even when apart.

8. Is there a limit to how many times you reincarnate? Incarnation is for the purpose of Emotional and Spiritual growth. As long as the soul desires to evolve in Emotional and/or Spiritual growth the soul has the option of incarnating to finish the work.

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Dorothy M. Neddermeyer. Ph.D.
about.me/drdorothy

Interview with Paranormal Investigator – Cheryl Lynn Carter…


my-card

What inspired you to write your first book?
About ten years ago a lovely lady named Toni Sun did a reading for me. She told me I was going to write something special. I told her I was already a journalist for a small newspaper, but she said no. It would be a book; maybe two or three. I chuckled to myself as the thought had never crossed my mind. I asked her if she knew what the books would be about. She just said, “You’ll know.” But I didn’t. Then I began my quest to search for answers about the afterlife. As a medium, I had the opportunity to “speak” with spirits and hear their stories. Some of them had been waiting years for somebody to finally hear them. I promised I would share their stories so that others would remember them. And so, I began writing my book.

How did you come up with the title?
At first I could not decide on a title. Sure I had several tentative ideas, but not one that seemed quite fitting. I decided to start writing and figured the right one would find its way to me. Then one day my Great Grandmother Elizabeth “said” to me, “Let’s call our book “Whispers.” And so “Whispers Beyond the Grave” it was.

Is this your first book? How many books have you written (published or unpublished)?
This is my first book and I’m proud to say I have become an International Author already. Currently, I am working on two new books: “Fear the Darkness” and “When the Dead Come Alive.” I have also helped with the research on my friend Tom Conwell’s new book “They Are Here: Central US UFOs.” I verified the Native teachings for him.

whispers

Can you tell us about your upcoming books?
“When the Dead Come Alive” is the next book about my adventures and encounters with those from the Other Side. I met a lot of spirits this past year that wanted their story to be told. I shall never forget my “new friends” from Waverly Hills, Ashmore Estates, Poasttown Elementary, Collingwood Arts Center, Willis House Inn, the USS Edson, USS Silversides, Detroit Fort Wayne and a special farm in Farwell, MI.

“Fear the Darkness” is a collection of dark and twisted short stories and poems. I’m not sure where these came from as they are a bit edgy for me; perhaps I was channeling Edgar Allen Poe!

Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?
The message that I want to convey is actually very simple. “Spirits were once people too!” Often times people forget this. They may have transcended into that mysterious dimension known as the afterlife leaving their physical body behind. However, they are still unique individuals like you and I with intelligence and feelings. They should always be treated with respect.

How much of the book is realistic?
My book is 100% true. I’m a Medium, Paranormal Researcher and EVP Specialist. This book is about my strange, scary, but mostly cool true encounters with the many spirits from the other side.

Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?
You don’t have to be “gifted” to communicate with your loved ones that have passed on. Just talk to them. They can hear you. Perhaps they are already leaving you signs. Be more observant. Do you sometimes experience a whiff of perfume or pipe tobacco right under your nose? Does a certain song play when you are thinking about them? These are just some of the little ways they are letting you know that they are still around and thinking about you.

What do you enjoy most about writing?
I love sharing my experiences in such a way that the reader feels they are right there with me. It’s a real compliment when people say they enjoyed the trip.

What age did you start writing stories/poems?
I was inspired by my teacher Mrs. Foley when I was a freshman in high school. She made English class a true experience and I quickly grew to appreciate the written word. After that, the stories and poems flowed as my hand penned the cursive words over the paper.

What is your favorite part/chapter of your book/project?
Oh my, don’t make me choose. Each one of my paranormal encounters was special to me. But I suppose my favorite would be the chapter about Sarah. There was a local legend about a woman in white that would roam William Ganong Cemetery at night. The story was intriguing to me so I decided to visit one afternoon. I had been there only a short time when she appeared to me. She led me to her grave the old gravestone crumbling with age. As I brushed away the leaves, the words read, “Sarah Dickinson, wife of Mathew, died 1865 at age 20.” I heard her disembodied voice as she cried, “Help!” and also captured EVPs of the same. She told me she was waiting for her beloved Mathew to come back from the Civil War. He promised her he would return and she promised to wait. I quickly did the math and realized she had been waiting 148 years! I “saw” that she was sick perhaps with the deadly flu that claimed its victims in one day. She went to sleep and never awoke; she had no idea she was dead. After four visits to the cemetery, I finally sat down on the stone bench and had a serious talk with her. I told her the truth and that I knew where to find Mathew. As I encouraged her to walk over the beautiful bridge toward the light, she became hesitant. I asked Mathew to come to the bridge. There he was wearing his Union uniform and twenty years old again. He wanted to be just like she remembered. When Sarah saw him, she raced over the bridge and into his loving arms. In typical “Gone With the Wind” fashion, he picked her up and carried her away. It was a true love story.

What book are you reading now?
At the moment, I’m reading a great book by my good friend Jeff Mudgett called “Bloodstains.” After discovering diaries that belonged to his Great Great Grandfather Herman Webster Mudgett, he began searching to uncover the truth. The truth being he was really known as H.H. Holmes America’s most notorious serial killer during the Chicago World’s Fair of 1893.

Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?
My friend Tom Conwell has written two very interesting books: “They Are Here: East Coast UFOs” and “They Are Here: Central US UFOs.” Both books contain amazing information convincing me that we are not alone in this universe.

Do you nibble as you write? If so what’s your favorite snack food?
I always enjoy a Coke and a Reese’s. They give me the energy I need to keep going.

Do you have any odd habits or childhood stories?
Besides the fact that I talk to dead people? Well, I do remember when I was four and Grandma would open the cedar chest. As she lifted the lid, the earthy scent would fill the room. She reached inside and pulled out some old books. Together we sat on the bed surrounded by generations of relatives living within the weathered pages. I watched as she carefully turned each page of black and white photographs fastened on with tiny black corners. Memories in bits and pieces spilled out before our eyes. Grandma said they were places she could return to again and again no matter how much times goes by. Although I did not know who these people were, it appeared they made Grandma smile. It was as though they were talking to her. But of course, I thought that was silly. Pictures didn’t talk. Then one day, she left me alone as she went into the kitchen. I picked up a photograph and held it in my hand. And indeed the photograph “spoke” to me. It felt as if my hand was a telephone allowing me to connect to some unknown place without ever dialing the number.

What genre is your next project? What is it about?
My next project is already underway. I’ve been asked to be part of a documentary called “The Mystery of Farwell Farm” about the mysterious happenings at my friend’s farm in Farwell, MI. We’ve been working on this for over a year and continue to discover new information.

How do we find your books, blog and bio?
My book is available on Amazon.com. You will find my Author page on Facebook by searching Cheryl.Lynn.Carter.author

cheryl-lynn

Awe Inspiring Headstones…


Some of these headstones are just magnificent, while others tell the story of the departed. I have had a fascination with headstones from an early age (yes I know I’m weird). However many of the older memorials are just the most beautiful examples of stone masonry, an art form unfortunately dying. Today the extreme costs of such effigys is prohibitive to most people.

These examples are of the more famous kind but there are many, many more in old graveyards that I have found, that are works of art.

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John Paul Jones’ Crypt
ANNAPOLIS, MARYLAND
The crypt of John Paul Jones on display at the United States Naval Academy. (Photo: Kevin H. Tierney/US Navy/Public Domain)

John Paul Jones was the father of the American Navy, best known for shouting, “I have not yet begun to fight!” in response to a request for his surrender during a Revolutionary War battle. Less well known is the fact that for over a century after his death, the location of Jones’ body remained a mystery. Following his victories with the American Navy, Jones soon found his employment opportunities in America running dry. He joined up with the Russian Imperial Navy for a time, until he retired to Paris. Jones died there and was buried in a cemetery belonging to the French royal family. This property changed hands and Jones was forgotten. It wasn’t until 1905 that Jones’ remains were rediscovered by America’s Ambassador to France and returned to the United States.

Today, Jones rests in a extravagant sarcophagus below the chapel of the United States Naval Academy. The incredible coffin is covered in sculpted barnacles and is held up by bronze dolphins. The whole thing is sculpted out of a black and white marble that makes it look as though it has been weathered by untold ages beneath the waves—not so far from the truth.

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2. Davis Memorial
HIAWATHA, KANSAS
The Davis Memorial.
Davis and his wife Sarah in old age. (Photo: Ammodramus/Public Domain)

The Davises were a simple but highly successful Kansas farming family. When Sarah Davis passed way in 1930 her burial site was marked with a simple headstone that reflected the quiet life she and her husband had led, despite the vast wealth they had accrued. But soon after Sarah had been placed in the ground, John had her stone removed and replaced with a marble statue, which was just the beginning. Over the next decade John installed 11 total marble or granite statues, many of which depicted Sarah as a young woman, an old woman, and even as an angel. There was also a statue of John resting in comfortable armchair next to an identical, empty armchair. All of these are arranged in a haphazard manner, facing in all different directions.

The cost of the memorial became astronomical, which upset a great number of Hiawathans suffering under the poverty of the Great Depression in a small town that did not even have a hospital. Many believed that John was simply trying to squander his fortune so that Sarah’s family, who had always hated the man, could not touch it. Still others believed that he was simply an eccentric with a permanently broken heart.

jules-verne
3. Jules Verne’s Tomb
AMIENS, FRANCE
Jules Verne’s tomb.
Jules Verne’s tomb. (Photo: Atlas Obscura user rogerbcn)

It’s fitting that Jules Verne, father of science fiction, would have a dark, otherworldly gravestone. Two years after his death a sculpture entitled “Vers l’Immortalité et l’Eternelle Jeunesse” (“Towards Immortality and Eternal Youth”) was erected atop his marker. Designed by sculptor Albert Roze, and using the actual death mask of the writer, the statue depicts the shrouded figure of Jules Verne breaking his own tombstone and emerging from the grave.

The effigy has become iconic enough that in first issue of seminal science fiction magazine Amazing Stories (first published in 1926) and for many years thereafter a drawing of his tombstone appeared as part of the masthead.

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4. Jesus in Cowboy Boots
PARIS, TEXAS
Willet Babcock’s grave
Willet Babcock’s grave, topped by Jesus in cowboy boots. (Photo: Library of Congress/Carol M. Highsmith/LC-DIG-highsm-26027)

Willet Babcock was a furniture and casket maker by trade, and ended up in Paris, Texas where his factory and downtown store put him squarely in the center of respected Parisians. Before he died, in 1881, he ordered himself an impressive memorial from a master-stonecutter, a German immigrant named Gustave Klein, who carved some of the more ornate markers at Evergreen. Along with some typical memorial elements—carved wreaths, a cross, an angelic figure in robes—Babcock gave his final presentation to the world a little Texas twang. Jesus is sporting cowboy boots.

There is debate about whether it really is Jesus. Some say the face is too feminine (there is no beard) and he (she?) appears to be leaning on the cross rather than carrying it. But whoever the angel in robes was intended to represent, the memorial has long since been dubbed “Jesus in Cowboy Boots.”

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5. Lycian Rock Tombs
FETHIYE, TURKEY
A Lycian rock tomb.
One of the impressive rock tombs. (Photo: Atlas Obscura user skaremedia)

The Ancient Lycians believed that their dead were carried to the afterlife by angels from the heavens. To facilitate this ascent they placed their honored dead in geographically high places, like this cliffside. The tombs, many of which date back to the 4th century, are guarded by massive entryways adorned with tall Romanesque columns and intricate reliefs. The oldest tombs are often no more than unremarked holes dug into the rock. Despite the external grandeur, the interior of the tombs are spare chambers cut into the rock with a simple monolith inside to display the body. The rooms are otherwise empty from hundreds of years of looting.

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6. The Snow Tomb of Captain Robert Falcon Scott
ANTARCTICA
The Grave of the Southern Party.
The grave of Scott and his men. (Photo: Herbert Ponting/Public Domain)

In November 1912, the remaining members of Captain Robert Falcon Scott’s Terra Nova expedition were searching for their leader. Scott and his party had vanished into the snows the previous year, never returning from their quest for the South Pole. One of the group saw “a small object projecting above the surface” of the snow. It was part of a tent. They had discovered the final resting place of Scott and two of his men, Henry “Birdie” Bowers and Edward Wilson. Scott lay between them, his diary recording their final days: “It seems a pity, but I do not think I can write more,” the last entry ran, “For God’s sake look after our people.”

The bodies of Scott and his men were not brought back to Britain. Instead, wrote Cherry-Garrard, who had been part of the search party, “We never moved them. We took the bamboos of the tent away and the tent itself covered them. Over them we built the cairn.” This tomb of snow, topped with a stark cross, was all that marked the remote spot in the Antarctic emptiness which has not been seen for over 100 years. The grave site was quickly buried in drifting snow, while the tent and bodies have been migrating downward into the ice under the weight of accumulating snow and seaward with the ice shelf toward the Ross Sea. A more permanent monument to Scott and his men was erected on Observation Hill near McMurdo Station, but given time, it is likely that, encased deep within an iceberg, the bodies of Scott, Bowers, and Wilson will slowly drift away out to sea.

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7. The Tomb of Enrique Torres Belón
LAMPA, PERU
Tomb of Enrique Torres Belón
Inside Belón’s strange tomb. (Photo: Atlas Obscura user slsteinb)

Lampa is a small colonial town with all the provincial charms of a 16th century Peruvian town, but what stands out the most is its enormous church, the Iglesia Santiago Apóstol. Connected to the church is Enrique Torres Belón’s freaky mausoleum, a silo of bones capped by an aluminum replica of Michelangelo’s Pietà.

Belón, an engineer and architect, designed and built the tomb in the mid-20th century so that he and his wife could rest in peace surrounded by the earthly remains of the city’s forbearers. The otherworldly tribute is lined with hanging human skeletons and hundreds of skulls exhumed from the town’s cemetery and the crypts beneath the church. At the bottom is a black marble cross, whose lighting exaggerates the eerie shadows cast by the macabre wall hangings. The dramatic grave makes Belón seem very important—all Lampa’s founders are looking upon him for all eternity.

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8. Mrs. Chippy Monument
WELLINGTON, NEW ZEALAND
Mrs Chippy, resting on Harry McNeish’s grave.
Mrs. Chippy atop Harry McNeish’s grave. (Photo: Atlas Obscura user sandwichgirl)

Early polar exploration was a lonely business where sailors would be stuck on their ships for months, subsisting on barely edible rations among some of the world’s most inhospitable climates. However, the Shackleton expedition was made just a bit brighter by the presence of the ship’s cat, Mrs. Chippy. Harry McNeish was a carpenter on Ernest Shackleton’s Endurance expedition to Antarctica, as well as a member of the long journey from Elephant Island to South Georgia. He was also the primary caretaker of Mrs. Chippy, the cat that accompanied the men until the Endurance became trapped in pack ice. Unfortunately Mrs. Chippy was shot along with the sled dogs once the team became trapped in the ice. To honor the brave, beloved kitty, the New Zealand Antarctic Society added a bronze statue of Mrs. Chippy to McNeish’s grave in 2004.

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9. Circus Train Wreck Victims Memorial
COLUMBUS, GEORGIA
Circus memorial
The Big Top-shaped headstone for the victims of the circus train wreck. (Photo: Atlas Obscura user mom0ja)

The Con T. Kennedy Carnival Show had just wrapped up an unusually successful Harvest Festival week in the center of Atlanta. On the early morning of November 22, 1915, the 28-car Kennedy show train pulled out of the station with the entire company on board. Just a few hours later the show train collided with a steel passenger train. The crash was so powerful that the two engines fused together. While no one was killed on the sturdier passenger train, the Kennedy performers were not so lucky. “I saw those poor fellows pinned in their sleeping wagons and they could not get out,” one eyewitness recalled.

The fire raged for hours. When the smoke had finally cleared, bodies were discovered in the wreckage. At least 50 Kennedy workers were injured. Due to the transient nature of show people, the exact number and identity of those killed has never been determined. After a mass funeral at Columbus’s First Baptist Church, there was a procession to Riverdale Cemetery where the burials took place. Since the carnival band’s instruments had been burned, local Columbians loaned them instruments so they could send their comrades off in style.

In honor of his fallen employees, Con. Kennedy erected an appropriately circus-y monument in Columbus’ Riverdale Cemetery, and then he and the rest of his remaining crew headed back down the long, hard, show business road.

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10. The Grave of Tom Thumb
TATTERSHALL, ENGLAND
The Grave of Tom Thumb
The diminutive grave of Tom Thumb. (Photo: Thozza/CC BY-SA 3.0)

Nestled in the quaint Lincolnshire countryside is the village of Tattershall where, according to legend, the remains of a miniature folk hero can still be found. Visitors who step inside the town’s 16th century church will find a tiny grave marker, adorned with flowers and bearing the name Tom Thumb. He was reputedly just over 18 inches tall and lived to the ripe old age of 101 when he passed away in 1620.

It’s difficult to pick fact from fiction because Tom Thumb has been a common character in English folklore for hundreds of years, with the first written examples of his escapades appearing in the early 1500s. Traditionally, the character of Tom Thumb was a canny, cunning boy who used his size to trick and beguile foolish people. There are rumours that the Tom Thumb buried at Tattershall was popular with the King’s court and often visited London. Whether or not this is true and whether or not a man named Tom Thumb really is buried in that small church, it’s safe to say that his story has become forever intertwined with wider folklore. This charming little grave is now part of that.

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11. William G. Bruce’s Grave
MONT VERNON, NEW HAMPSHIRE
William G. Bruce Grave
The hound who guards the grave of William G. Bruce. (Photo: Atlas Obscura user GregBoggis)

William G. Bruce’s family had deep roots in the Town of Mont Vernon. He was an avid hunter and suffered a grave wound while hunting alone in 1883. He died the same day of his accident, but not before his wife Augusta Whittemore Bruce was rushed to his deathbed. William Bruce was industrious and frugal in life and left his wife a substantial sum of money. Augusta Bruce used some of this inherited wealth to commission noted monument maker Peter Brennan to craft a fitting memorial for her departed husband.

The book Lives Once Lived Here contains a facsimile of a ledger page that reveals Mrs. Bruce paid $35.00 each for the two headstones for her and her husband and $145.00 for the granite dog (a couple thousand in today’s dollars), who has remained faithfully by his master’s side in perpetual vigilance as his stone guardian in the afterlife.

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12. The Grave of Miss Baker
HUNTSVILLE, ALABAMA
Miss Baker’s Headstone
Miss Baker’s grave, topped with bananas from visitors. (Photo: Atlas Obscura user treytatum)

Miss Baker, a monkey purchased by NASA from a Miami pet shop, was the first primate to return alive from space. She and another monkey, Miss Able, were fitted with adorable little caps and jackets to wear into space and crammed into less than adorable metal monitoring capsules. Then in the wee hours of May 28, 1959, the duo were placed into a Jupiter rocket and shot 300 miles into the sky. The flight only lasted 16 minutes, over half of which consisted of weightlessness, and the rocket landed safely, for the first time, in the Atlantic Ocean.

She retired to the Naval Aerospace Medical Center in Pensacola where she was married to another monkey, Big George. Miss Baker died of kidney failure in 1984 at the age of 27, earning her the secondary honor of being the longest lived squirrel monkey on record. She has the honor of being buried in a grave outside of the U.S. Space & Rocket Center in Alabama and given a proper headstone next to her first husband. The grave is located in the center’s parking lot, but admirers and fans of the little astronaut still come by and leave bananas on her headstone.

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13. The Tomb of Jane Griffith
BROOKLYN, NEW YORK
To Jane, My Wife.
“To Jane my wife.” (Photo: Atlas Obscura user Luke J. Spencer)

Jane Griffith’s grave depicts a commonplace domestic scene with a tragically sorrowful ending. Charles Griffith says goodbye to his wife Jane on the footsteps of their brownstone on 109 West 13th Street. It is the morning of August 3rd, 1857, and he is about to leave for a typical day’s work, starting with a commute on the 6th Avenue horse trolley which waits on the corner. When Charles returned home from work, he found his wife dead from heart failure.

The artist’s detail is extraordinary, from the iron fencing to their pet dog waiting on the top step of the brownstone. Simply titled to “Jane my Wife,” the monument captures poignantly the morning Charles said farewell to his wife without knowing that it was for the last time.

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14. Hi Jolly Monument
QUARTZSITE, ARIZONA

The grave of the U.S. government’s first official camel rider. (Photo: Atlas Obscura user Avoiding Regret)

During the mid-1800s when much of the southwest of America was still uninhabited desert, the government decided they would deal with the terrain like the desert dwellers of the Middle East and hire camel drivers, such as Hi Jolly, to carry their goods across the arid terrain. He was born Philip Tedro in Syria, converted to Islam and changed his name to Hadji Ali, which the Americans of the U.S. Calvary pronounced as “Hi Jolly.” They contracted him to be the first member of the experimental Army Camel Corps. Jolly stood out from the rest of the riders for both his ambition and his cantankerous attitude.

Eventually the camel corps was disbanded after it was found that the much larger camels spooked the native livestock and horses. Jolly remained in the states before passing away in Arizona in 1902. Today his grave is marked by a stony pyramid that is topped by an etched metal camel.

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15. Grave of Joseph Palmer
LEOMINSTER, MASSACHUSETTS
Joseph Palmer’s grave
“Persecuted for wearing the beard.” (Photo: Atlas Obscura user kensears37)

Joseph Palmer began wearing a beard in the 1820s, in spite of the fact that beards had been out of fashion for nearly a century. Palmer was considered by most all in his small town to be slovenly and ungodly. He was even criticized by his local preacher for communing with the devil, famously responding to the accusation, “…if I remember correctly, Jesus wore a beard not unlike mine.”

In May of 1830, Palmer was attacked by four men outside of a hotel in Fitchburg, Massachusetts. Armed with razors and scissors, the men attempted to forcibly shave Palmer’s face, but the bewhiskered man stabbed two of his attackers with a pocketknife, and was subsequently arrested for assault. He could have avoided jail by paying a fine and court fees, but Palmer refused, maintaining his innocence, and more importantly his right to a glorious beard. He was subsequently jailed for 15 months, including time in solitary confinement.

Upon leaving prison, Palmer joined the Fruitlands utopian community in nearby Harvard, Massachusetts after being influenced by his friendship with fellow Fruitlander, Louisa May Alcott, who wrote a character based on him. Palmer died in 1865 and his tombstone displays a portrait of him with a long beard, a final act of rebellion.

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16. Merchant Ball
MARION, OHIO
Merchant Ball
The mysterious Merchant ball. (Photo: Atlas Obscura user markallender)

The Merchant family were prominent industrialists in Ohio, and when they erected this massive sphere in 1896 to mark the grave of Charles Merchant it matched the style and fortitude of the clan. The giant granite ball was placed atop a stone plinth and polished and stained to a fine shine, except for the circle where the ball rested on its stand. Within a few years of its installation the sphere had mysteriously begun to slowly rotate on its pedestal, eventually revealing the bald spot.

The estimated 5,200 pound ball had not been secured to the base, thinking the huge amount of friction would have simply held it in place. Several times, the Merchant descendants have attempted to right the sphere, once oven securing it with tar. Despite all this, the stone has managed to continue spinning on its pedestal. No one is quite sure why the sphere keeps moving, be it from imperceptible vibration or ghostly intervention as some would have it. But no matter the cause, the Merchant ball rolls on.

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17. Nicolas Cage’s Pyramid Tomb
NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA
Nicolas Cage’s Pyramid Tomb
The empty tomb, waiting for Nicolas Cage. (Photo: Britt Reints/CC BY 2.0)

There are plenty of pyramid tombs, but most date to the 19th century and earlier. This one is not only modern, but empty. Actor Nicolas Cage purchased a plot in the famous St. Louis Cemetery No. 1 and erected a stark, nine-foot-tall stone pyramid for himself. There is no name on the pyramid yet, but it is emblazoned with the Latin maxim, “Omni Ab Uno,” which translates to “Everything From One.” The actor himself has chosen to remain silent about his reasoning for the flamboyant tomb. Some speculate it’s an homage to the “National Treasure” movie franchise. Others think the pyramid is evidence of the strange actor’s ties to the probably-fictitious secret Illuminati society. The more paranormally minded suggest that the pyramid is where Cage will regenerate his immortal self.

Whatever his reasons, the Cage pyramid has already become an iconic part of the cemetery, much to the chagrin of many locals who are furious that he was able to obtain a plot in the cramped graveyard. Many have even accused the tomb of damaging or removing other centuries-old burials to make room.

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18. Grave of Harry L. Collins
LOUISVILLE, KENTUCKY
Grave of Harry L. Collins
The grave of Frito-Lay’s corporate magician, Harry L. Collins. (Photo: Atlas Obscura user Matt Blitz)

Harry Collins was a lifelong magic lover, and even performed in jazz musician Bob Crosby’s traveling USO show, “This Is The Army Show” during World War II. After serving, Collins returned to the United States, moved to the big city, and got a job as a salesmen at Frito-Lay, the purveyor of many a fine snack food. For the next twenty years, he was a Frito-Lay man by day and “Mr. Magic,” Louisville’s most popular magician, by night. He was so dedicated to both professions that the magic word for every one his tricks was “Frito-Lay!”

In 1970, Frito-Lay named Mr. Magic their official corporate magician. He traveled across the country and world, performing magic tricks and paying homage to corn chips. Now his effigy stands atop his grave, extending an arm to welcome visitors into his world of corn chips and wonder.

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19. Afterglow Vista
FRIDAY HARBOR, WASHINGTON
Afterglow Vista
“Afterglow Vista,” a fantastical mausoleum steeped in symbolism. (Photo: Atlas Obscura user thendaramarie)

Its formal name is McMillin Mausoleum, named for John S. McMillin, Freemason, Methodist, and lime works businessman. He combined all of these devotions when he constructed the epic mausoleum that would house the remains of he and his family’s remains, Afterglow Vista, the name which is actually placed on the stone arch leading to the burial site.

The so-called “mausoleum” is actually an open air rotunda with a huge limestone table in the middle. Around the table are thick stone chairs not only representing the members of the McMillin family, but actually containing their ashes and acting as headstones. This was meant to represent the family dinner table that the McMillins would rather around. There seems to be an empty space at the table and it is said that this was meant to represent the McMillin son who turned away from God. The table is circled by a six Roman columns and a single broken column which is said to represent the unfinished nature of man’s life. The columns were originally going to hold a brass dome over the table, but in the end the family opted to leave the site exposed to the elements. Even the steps leading up to the monument were numbered with Masonic significance to represent the stages of life.

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20. Cursed Memorial of Colonel Buck
BUCKSPORT, MAINE
John Buck Memorial
The cursed stain on the Buck memorial. (Photo: Courtesy of J.W. Ocker)

Bucksport’s founder, Colonel Jonathan Buck, had a witch executed in the town’s early days. Before she died, she cursed Buck to always bear the mark of that deed. One story says that while she was burning at the stake, her leg fell from her body and into the crowd, and this stain has appeared to remind everyone of the gruesome event. Whatever the story, Bucksport is left with a pointy stocking-shaped stain on an obelisk of granite in a hilltop graveyard on Main Street, dedicated to the founder of the town. It hangs right below his name like a stocking on a fireplace.

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21. Gravesite of Utah’s First Jedi Priest
WEST VALLEY CITY, UTAH
Head Stone of the First Ordained Jedi in Utah
“May the force be with you–always.” (Photo: Atlas Obscura user jbbutcher79)

In sleepy Valley View Memorial Park there is a treasure the first of its kind in Utah. Hidden in the Southwest corner of the cemetery is an onyx-colored plaque in the ground that is hard to ignore. It reads, “Steven Allan Ford April 7, 1980-September 7, 2010 MAY THE FORCE BE WITH YOU–ALWAYS.” This is no overzealous fan, but indeed the resting place of someone remarkable: Steven Ford, the first ordained Jedi priest in the predominantly Mormon state of Utah.

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22. The Strange Procession Which Never Moves
MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY
Wooldridge Monuments and their thousand-yard stare
Colonel Woolridge’s private statuary. (Photo: C. Bedford Crenshaw/Public Domain)

This might look like a small, private cemetery within Maplewood Cemetery, but it is actually the grave of just one man, Colonel Henry G. Wooldridge. It was built over the course of seven years until Wooldridge’s own death in 1899, and commemorates family members and other loved ones Wooldridge lost over the course of his lifetime. The figures include his mother and sisters and his horse named Fop.

Prompted by no one but his own aching heart, the man spent his last years pouring his fortune into immortalizing all that was irretrievably lost in stunning fashion. After more than a century of visitation by a public fascinated by the spectacle, the site has acquired an unofficial, completely disconcerting name: “The Strange Procession Which Never Moves.”

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23. Ämari Pilots Cemetery
ÄMARI, ESTONIA
Ämari Pilots’ Cemetery
The grave of an Estonian pilot. (Photo: Robert Treufeldt/CC BY-SA 3.0 ee)

Tucked into the scrubby woods near Estonia’s Ämari Air Base is a pilot’s graveyard where Soviet airmen are buried beneath the fins of the very aircraft they likely died in. While some of the graves are crude and simple affairs, the graves of the many of the military pilots are topped with actual tail fins from Russian aircraft. These are dedicated to pilots who flew and died when Estonia was part of the Eastern Bloc until the dissolution of the Soviet Union in 1991. The stark opposition and funereal atmosphere turn the site into a haunting memorial not just to the fighting men buried at the site, but for Estonia’s past as well.

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24. The Haserot Angel
CLEVELAND, OHIO
The Angel of Death Victorious
The weeping angel on Francis Haserot’s tomb. (Photo: Ian MacQueen/CC BY-SA 3.0)

Perhaps the most famous statue at Lakeview Cemetery is “The Angel of Death Victorious” seated on the marble gravestone of one Francis Haserot. The life-size bronze angel holds an upside-down torch, a symbol of life extinguished. Perhaps its most unsettling feature, however, is how the statue appears to be weeping black tears at all times. These “tears” formed over time, an effect of the aging bronze combined with the impressive sculpting work of the piece itself. This lacrimal feature attracts a number of visitors and tourists each year.

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25. The Recumbent Effigy of Victor Noir
PARIS, FRANCE

Victor Noir’s romantic effigy in Père Lachaise Cemetery. (Photo: Atlas Obscura user allison)

Victor Noir was a 19th-century political journalist shot in a duel by Prince Pierre Bonaparte in 1870. He became a symbol of the imperial injustice and a martyr for the Republic. More than one hundred thousand people came to his funeral, where frenetic weeping was mixed with calls for insurrection. After the downfall of the Second Empire, Victor Noir’s remains were transferred to the Père Lachaise Cemetery, and a bronze effigy was commissioned.

Noir was depicted as an elegant man, lying dead on the floor after the impact of the lethal bullet, his top hat tipped over on his side. Dalou chose to represent Noir in a very realistic way, his face having the detailed quality of a cast death mask. However, another detail of Noir’s anatomy would soon get more attention than the sober realism of the memorial bronze.

Victor’s grave remains one of the most popular at Père Lachaise, but not because of his political symbolism. Generations of women have come to kiss his lips and rub his bulge, believing it will bring good luck. After a century and a half of this action, Victor Noir’s lips and groin are shiny and nickel-clean, while the rest of his body presents the greenish tone of oxidized bronze.

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26. The Grave of Rope Walker
CORSICANA, TEXAS
A detail of his original headstone.
The grave of the peg-legged Jewish rope walker. (Photo: Atlas Obscura user seh256)

It’s not his name, but rather his profession. Rope Walker was a peg-legged tightrope walker who died in 1884, when he fell from a rope stretched across one of the town’s main streets with an iron stove strapped to his back. He asked for a rabbi as he was dying, but he did not reveal his name. Using the scant information they had about his, the townspeople buried him as “Rope Walker” in the Hebrew Cemetery of Corsicana.

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28. Minerva in Green-Wood Cemetery
BROOKLYN, NEW YORK

Minerva waves to Lady Liberty from Battle Hill. (Photo: Atlas Obscura user allison)

Life-sized monuments are not so uncommon, but this one is half of a statue friendship. In 1920, Charles M. Higgins, an Irish immigrant and local history buff built an altar on Battle Hill to the long-slighted Revolutionary War Battle of Long Island, the first major battle after the Declaration of Independence. He chose to top the monument with a statue of Minerva, the Roman goddess of wisdom. As if to communicate between past and present, Minerva’s outstretched arm reciprocated exactly 3.5 miles away by the Statue of Liberty’s raised torch. Their friendship has stood the test of time (and condo development) and their line of sight to each other remains unobstructed.

Original post – http://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/28-headstones-that-defied-expectations?utm_source=facebook.com&utm_medium=atlas-page

 

Life After Death – Books for You to Discover..


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In my many years of interest and research into this phenomenon, I have found many books that give enlightening information on life after death and reincarnation. Some are pure statistical lists, others belief based and others scientific. No matter the avenue of knowledge, you can find some exceptional stories in them all.

I have attached a link to Goodreads list of near death books for your perusal. Enjoy.https://www.goodreads.com/shelf/show/near-death-experience

Have you researched this topic before?

Did my blog posts entice you to know more?

One book I found many years ago, detailed a professor who agreed with several colleagues that the first one of them to pass would contact the others by any means possible. It was a year or so later after his death, that each colleague experienced ‘channeled writing’. They discovered that they had all written a paragraph detailing this professors experience on the other side. Once the narrative was collected and pieced together, it told of his death, details of his funeral and other details he could only know if he ‘saw’ them.

Unfortunately I misplaced this book years ago and have never been able to find it again. However, the story has never left me.

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Are You An Old Soul..?


what-is-an-old-soul

So how do we know if we are an old soul or not? Let’s look at the most common traits for an old soul. Firstly, they are able to relate better to older people and that their views on life are more mature – a bit before their time, so to speak. Old souls are able to enjoy their own company and are more self sufficient when it comes to entertaining themselves. That is not to say they are lonely or introverted, just confident in themselves and old in heart, old in mind and old in soul, whose outlook on life is vastly different and more matured than those around him/her.

Here are some common personality traits:

Homebodies & Solitary

Someone who would rather stay in on Friday night instead of hitting the bars because they are disinterested in the pursuits and interests of the people in their age groups. A perfect partner would be someone who shares this sentiment.  A bottle of wine, candles, and a relaxed night of conversation and good company, is an old soul’s idea of a great evening.

Not materialistic

The material trappings of life do not hold with an old soul, they dismiss the short-lived things in life and do not see the purpose of pursuing things that can be easily taken away from them. Affection will be expressed through grand gestures that have deeper meaning, like love letters or poems, rather than diamond rings or luxury cars.

Strong Communication Skill

Old souls do not play games when it comes to communication.  They will express their feelings honestly and tell you like it is. Remember their intentions are good and from the heart.

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Careful with their Emotions

An old soul only responds to those whom they’re emotionally invested in.  Relationships without emotion, or a deeper connection, is meaningless to them. They will not open up immediately, careful with their emotional well-being until they get to know you.  Consequently, old souls tend to have placid, stable natures as a result of their approach to life.

Everything is Done with Purpose

An old soul sees the future picture rather than the superficial or shallow emotions of a passing crush. If a relationship is seen as not worthy then it will not be encouraged or valued. In other words settling for a person is not something they do.

Love of Knowledge, Wisdom and Truth.

An old soul finds himself gravitating towards the intellectual side of life with an inherent understanding that knowledge is power, wisdom is happiness and truth is freedom.

Transience of Life. 

Plagued with reminders of their own mortality, and that of everything and everyone around them can make an old soul weary and at times withdrawn. In many ways this dictates the way they live their lives.Their ability to reflect and learn from their actions and those of others is their greatest teacher in life.

Some people describe themselves as being “young at heart”, so too can young people be “old at heart”.

old-soul

True Near Death Stories…


Original article – http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2547714/Our-astonishing-near-death-stories-thousands-touched-thought-provoking-series-intensive-care-nurse.html

I was halfway to losing myself – and my baby

Carol Page, 67, a retired nurse and mother of three, lives with her husband John in Perthshire, Scotland. She says: ‘It should have been the moment I held my daughter in my arms. Instead, after a gruelling labour that lasted over 24 hours, my baby was  whisked away as the midwives treated me. ‘I could sense the panic around me as the medical team painfully pushed and pulled on my abdomen, blood seeping out.

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‘Then, suddenly, the pain lifted and I was fading, floating above my body.  ‘Though I could still hear the voices of the nurses, everything was quiet, gentle and a beautiful pinky white colour. ‘I wanted to stay in this pain-free and happy place, but then I heard the wail of my daughter and knew I had a responsibility to her and my two year-old son, Benjamin, waiting at home.  ‘Just as I made the choice to return, I heard a voice say ‘Christ, she’s back!’ and I slammed back into my body, where it was red, black and enveloped in pain. ‘I remained in hospital for five days and had numerous blood transfusions to replace the huge amounts I’d lost. ‘When I held Rachel in  my arms after those scary few hours, I was so relieved and happy. ‘ was halfway to losing her — and myself — but thankfully, I managed to hold on. ‘Forty years later, we still talk about it.’

Saved by my late grandmothers

Susanna Omuri said she had a vision of her late grandmothers telling her 'not to join them'

Susanna Omuri, 30, from Chigwell, Essex, is a stay-at-home mother to her 18-month-old daughter Isla. She says: ‘Almost 20 years ago, when I was 11, I visited a friend’s house. They lived on a dangerous bend and as I began to cross the road, a car came swerving around the corner.’It hit me hard, throwing me 30ft into the air. At that moment, suspended in the air above the car, time slowed  and I got a clear vision of my two grandmothers — who had died when I was young — standing in a group of other people nearby, though I couldn’t recognize anyone else. ‘They were shouting at me and saying I couldn’t join them. Then they purposefully turned their backs on me. ‘The next thing I remember was hitting the bonnet of the car and then the road. I was in agony, but fully conscious the whole time.’Despite being covered in bruises and suffering from shock, thankfully I was relatively unharmed.’An ambulance took me to the hospital and on the journey I couldn’t stop thinking about how angry my grandmothers had seemed.’The nurse told me that at the speed the car was going I should have died, and would have done if I had landed in any other way.’She said a fairy godmother must have been looking after me. I was sent home that day.’I was three when my first grandmother died and six when the other passed away. ‘Being so young when they died, I had only a hazy recollection of what they looked like, but when I saw them at the moment of the car accident they were as clear as day.’

Moment I knew my son was going to die

‘My husband Ken and I were staying with him, and I went out to speak to him.

Angela Dent, 61, said she had a premonition predicting her son's death

Angela Dent, 61, said she had a premonition predicting her son’s death

‘As I looked at him, a strange calmness came over me. We asked each other if we were OK and both said yes. In that moment, I got an inexplicable feeling that I would never see him again and that he was going to die. ‘We held each others gaze. ‘There was no sadness or smiling. It was strange and unnerving, but I have never felt so certain of something before. ‘I went back inside and into my bedroom and woke up my husband Ken to tell him of my premonition because I felt so strongly that something bad was going to happen. He told me not to be so silly.’Simon went off to work a little later. That night at 3.37am, the phone rang when Ken and I were asleep in bed. ‘I started crying, knowing it would be the news I had been dreading. ‘It was one of my son’s friends saying there had been a terrible car accident and Simon was very badly hurt. ‘We arrived at the scene of the accident, but our son had already been pronounced dead.’I was strangely numb, but knew that it was his time. I will never forget that moment when we looked at each other and I just knew.’

Childhood near miss that still haunts me

Anne Sanderson, 64, believes she had a near-death experience when she was a young child

Anne Sanderson, 64, believes she had a near-death experience when she was a young child

Anne Sanderson,  64, a retired medical secretary, of Larbert, in Falkirk, lives with her husband Derek, a landscape artist. They have two grown-up children. She says: ‘I had a near-death experience 62 years ago when I was just two. My twin sister, Lesley, and I had been put into our shared cot by our mother, Susan. ‘I recall the sparse but sunny room clearly, with its linoleum on the floor. Lesley was standing in one corner of the cot  and I was standing opposite her when she suddenly sneezed.’I got such a start that I fell over the raised cot side and onto the floor. At the same time I had one of the strangest and most lasting memories I’ve  ever experienced.’It was a dream-like scene where I found myself floating high above  Earth, looking down from outer space.’The blackness was all around highlighting the colours I could see below me — all blues, greens and yellows marking out the countries and seas. ‘I could see the entire globe so I must have been a long, long way away. There was also a slender, silver cord attached to my left hand side, reaching all the way back to Earth.’I felt very tranquil as though it was the most natural thing to be happening, even though I had no idea what I was looking at.’This happened in 1951. No colour photos of the world like that had yet been taken, let alone produced for a toddler to look at, and we didn’t even have a black-and-white television. How could I have known what the Earth looked like? ‘Fortunately, it was not my time to go. ‘I discovered much later that I’d cracked my collar bone. I regained consciousness in the hospital and have gone on living for six decades.’

White-robed man with a tranquil smile

Teacher Jan McPherson lives with her husband David, 68, a retired civil servant, in Carmarthen. They have two children. She says: ‘Five years ago, I grew ill with a lung condition called bronchiectasis which meant I had difficulty breathing.’As my condition deteriorated, I had the same dream over and over again. ‘In it, I went to a wooden door with a brass handle. Every time I tried to open the door it stayed closed.

Jan McPherson, from Ferryside, said she had a dream in which she saw ‘a man in white robes’ while she was suffering with a lung condition called bronchiectasis

One night the door opened and inside was a garden filled with blond children playing by a waterfall.’They had smiling, angelic faces and the air was filled with laughter. I had an overwhelming feeling of calm. In the corner was a man in white robes. ‘He had a long, grey beard and hair and carried a stave, rather like a shepherd’s. ‘He had the most a tranquil smile I have ever seen and radiated warmth and light. ‘Soon, I knew it was time to return, but I felt sure I’d had been privileged to witness such a scene.’Over the next few days my condition began to improve. I believe I was touched by healing hands and miraculously given strength from somewhere that night.’

I was hovering 10ft above hospital bed

Bob Pendlebury, 63, a retired financial services manager, lives in Hove, East Sussex.

Bob Pendlebury, 63, a retired financial services manager, said he recalls floating ten feet above his hospital bed after an asthma attack

Bob Pendlebury, 63, a retired financial services manager, said he recalls floating ten feet above his hospital bed after an asthma attack.He says: ‘Five years ago, I had an asthma attack that very nearly killed me. I was at home with my wife when suddenly I felt very tired and my breathing became difficult. Within minutes, I was struggling for each breath and panicking.’My wife, Nicole, rang for an ambulance and I was rushed to A&E, where they gave me emergency drugs and adrenaline as I had stopped breathing. I was convinced I was about to die.’I blacked out in one of the emergency rooms while doctors surrounded me, pulling tubes in and out of me.’The next thing I can remember is hovering 10ft in the air in the corner of the ceiling, looking down at myself on the hospital bed. I could see lots of people rushing in and out of the room.’Then suddenly my wife was leaving.

‘I was not in pain and couldn’t understand what all the fuss was about. I remember thinking: ‘That’s nice, Nicole’s abandoning me.’ Then I felt a sting in my neck, as though vinegar was being poured into my artery, and suddenly I came to again. Things slowly came back into focus.’I made a full recovery.I later found out that magnesium had been injected into my neck as a last resort. My wife told me they’d been moments from performing a tracheotomy when I suddenly started breathing again.

Strange dream as my heart stopped

Carol Paradise had a near death experience in hospital in January 2013

Carol Paradise, 71, a former mayor of Bath, lives with her husband David, 75, a retired builder. They have three children. She says: ‘A year ago, I went into hospital for a straightforward gallstone operation. But the gallbladder burst and my organs began to shut down. ‘I was unconscious for two days and my heart stopped three times. ‘From those two days, all I can remember, vividly, is the strangest dream. My friend Anna was sitting by my bed and I suggested that we go for a walk in the grounds.’We came to a circle of grass edged by a low stone wall that looked down to the sea. ‘A group of people joined us and we turned to enter a cave that led into a black tunnel. ‘The group, none of whom I recognised, seemed happy and went into the tunnel. ‘I looked around and Anna had disappeared. At the last moment, I turned around and went back. ‘Then I remember waking up, being rushed along a hospital corridor and seeing my family around me.’I made a full recovery eventually and was told I had been very lucky to survive.’

A vision of nuns at my feet

Gerald Grainger, 69, from South Wales who suffered a near death experience when he had a heart attack in June last year.Gerald Grainger, 69, lives with his wife Laurel, a retired sales assistant, in Merthyr Tydfil. They have three grown-up children.

He says: ‘I was at home last June when I started feeling chesty and sweaty. My wife Laurel insisted I called 999.’In the ambulance, the lovely paramedic, Vanessa, was talking to me when suddenly I felt myself floating down a square tunnel lit by a bright shining light.’I could see four faceless figures, dressed in nun-like habits with pointy hats, float beside me and there was a feeling of calm, as if I was suspended in a lovely dream.’I was looking ahead at what I thought was a large garden when suddenly everything went into reverse and I was speeding backwards through the tunnel and I was awake, my face pressed up against the side of the ambulance with Vanessa saying: ‘Come on Gerald, fight for me, come on.’’We arrived at the hospital minutes later where I stayed for six days, after apparently suffering a heart attack and ‘dying’ for five minutes in the ambulance. ‘Vanessa had shocked me with a defibrillator and carried out CPR until I’d eventually regained consciousness.’When I returned home, I continued to see visions of those nuns at the foot of my bed every night for about six weeks, and, strangely, their presence felt very comforting.’I used to be afraid of dying alone, but I’m not any more.’

 

Have you experienced anything like this?
crossroad
Although I have not experienced a near death vision I did have a vivid dream once that showed me driving down a hill and the brakes failing. At the bottom of the hill there was a cross roads. As the car raced downward, I saw a large truck approaching. That is when I knew I would hit that truck and die. I did not recognize the location and dismissed the dream for years.
However, about seven years later a new boyfriend picked me up and said we were going to a new pub for supper. I was happy until I saw the hill – it was exactly the same as I dreamt, which filled me with dread. I asked my boyfriend to stop the car until I could calm myself. He soothed me by saying if he wasn’t in the dream then it would not come true. Eventually, I agreed and we drove down the hill, across the crossroads and onward to our supper date with no incident. Needless to say I did not travel that route ever again.

Signs From Your Loved Ones…


I found this interesting article regarding ‘signs’ we receive from the other side. Many of us find objects, such as feathers, or see butterflies or ladybirds etc. and know that is our loved one showing they are near. For me it is ‘feeling’ my parents hands holding mine especially near water. It is an echo of being a small child and them holding my hands to swing me through the waves at the beach. There are also aromas that tell me they are there – usually at times of extreme emotional turmoil.

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After our loved ones cross over, they are very anxious to let us know they are okay and are aware of what is going on in our lives. If we are not able to feel them around us, they will often give us signs that we cannot ignore. The person who is given the sign usually knows he or she is receiving a message from the other side. I always tell my clients that they do not have to look for signs – the signs will come to them.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/5894048

The signs our loved ones give us most often are:

They come through as an animal. Our loved ones are able to use their energy to go inside of an animal, such as a butterfly, ladybug, bird, or dragonfly – for a brief period of time. The animal does something it usually would not do, such as land on us, peck at our window, scream at us, etc.

They place common objects such as feathers, coins, or rocks in our path. Our loved ones like to place things over and over again in our path that were significant to them. I have had clients come to me who have had jars filled with feathers, coins, and objects they have found in the most unusual places.

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They give off fragrances. We can often tell our deceased loved ones are around us when we smell their perfume, flowers, cigar or cigarette smoke, or any other familiar smell they had. There is usually no logical explanation of why the smell is there.

They make songs come on at the perfect time. We know they are around when their favorite songs come on at the right time with the exact words we need to hear. Often the same song is played in many different places.

They come to us in dreams. One of the easiest ways for them to come through to us is in our dreams. All we need to do is to ask them to come, and they will. However, we should ask them to wake us up after they come, or else we will not remember the dream. A dream that is a true visitation will be very peaceful and we will know it is truly our loved one. We will remember this type of dream in detail many years later. (On the other hand, a subconscious dream may be frightening or feel bad. This type of dream is not your loved one.)

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They show us the same numbers over and over. They loved to give us numbers that are relevant to them or you, such as birth dates, anniversaries – or repeating numbers, such as 1111, 2222, 3333, etc. These numbers may appear on clocks, billboards, or any other familiar place.

They allow us to feel peaceful for no reason. When our loved ones are in the room, they usually make us feel so loved and at peace. It usually happens at the most unsuspecting time, so there is no logical explanation for our sudden bliss.

They place thoughts in our head. Because they in spirit form, our loved ones don’t have an audible voice. Therefore, they give us messages telepathically. Pay attention to thoughts that just “pop” into your head. We can tell the difference between our thoughts and theirs by backtracking our thoughts. If you can find the thought that triggered the thought of your loved one, it is probably your thought. If something your loved one would say just pops in your head for no reason, it is probably him or her speaking directly to you!

They love to play with electricity. They turn electricity on and off. They like to flicker lights, turn the television and radio on and off, and make appliances beep for no apparent reason.

They make buzzing noises in our ears. Because our loved ones speak to us on a different, higher frequency, we may hear ringing in our ears when they are trying to get our attention. This is a sign telling you to listen to what they are saying.

The list can go on and on, but these are the most common ways they let us know they are around. If you haven’t received any of these signs, simply ask your loved ones to come to you to let you know they are okay. Tell them to come to you in a dream and to wake you up after the dream. The more you are aware of the messages they are giving you, the more they will continue to allow you to know they are present. Be patient and persistent, and I promise that they will give you the signs you have always wanted. They really are okay and want you to be too!

What are your ‘signs’ from loved ones?

Have you had something move, disappear or appear?

 

Interview Brian Hayden – An Experience of Holding onto Life…


Brian Hayden

What inspired you to write your first book?

My first Book, “Understanding Strategic And Tactical Planning” was a surprise. I was the Chief Operating Officer for Specialty, 24 hour and Emergency Animal Hospitals for a national Animal hospital company. I wrote some notes, intended to help our hospital managers understand the process of operating animal hospitals. The American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA) saw it. They asked me to expand it into a book.

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The next two books dealt with my death. “Death: Living To Talk About It” started out as a blog. I had just come out of hospice, where I was supposed to have died. I began a blog – the sole purpose was try to understand the ordeal I went through.

Tell us a little about yourself before your experience.

I am happily married, with two grown children. I have six grandsons. Before the problems began, I was an Air Force Master Sargent, stationed in England. I was 35 years old when I first died.

What were your ‘belief’s on life after death at that time (if any)?

I hadn’t really thought about life after death. Just the usual passing thought now and then. That changed when I was in hospice, waiting to die.

I was visited by both of my grandmothers. They had passed many years before.  Though I was drugged and dying, years of reflection bring me to one conclusion. My grandmothers were with me – watching and waiting. I talk about this in detail, in am upcoming book.

book cover

How did you come up with the title?

The title of my first post death experience book came easily. “Death: Living To Talk About It”. Having died  (actually died) 5 times and had “should have died” moments more than 200 times – well, the title just presented itself.

Is this your first book?

This was not my first book. The management book I mentioned earlier was my first book. During that period, I had written several scripts for education videos.

Why did you decide to write about your experience?

At first, I wanted to write about my experiences to help me understand what had happened to me. Later, the motivation shifted. As the blog was progressing, I received feedback from many people. They appreciated me sharing my story. It was informational, and it let people know that they are not alone. Lots of people struggle with serious health issues. They were comforted knowing others were experiencing the same things they were.

What message do you want to send to your readers?

Hope. It’s a powerful word. When you read my books, you understand the adversity and struggles I had for many years. Never give up. Think to yourself: If he can still be skulking about after all that he has gone through, maybe then I can too.

Road to Transplant

How many books have you written (published or unpublished)?

“Road To Transplant” is the sequel to the “Death” book. It is an international bestselling book that chronicles my journey for life. Great information. It examines family dynamics during family crisis, looks into the process of getting a heart transplant, and follows me through the process of dying – not knowing if a heart would become available.

I’ve also written a book. “Five Short Stories and Twelve Poems”. I desperately needed a diversion from talking about illness. It is a fun book. The stories will make you laugh, cry, be happy and sad.

Poems.jpg

What book are you reading now?

I am re-reading “A Movable Feast” by Hemmingway. His words stir the creative juices in my mind. I always read him, and the Russian writers of the 18th and 19th century as I write my own stories.

Can you tell us about your upcoming book?

I have a second book of short stories and poems in the works. Also a historical fiction is almost completed. Both books should be available in about a year.

How do we find your books, blog and bio?

Everything you never knew you wanted to know about me is on my web page. Along with excerpts from my books, reviews and links to purchase them. Also, you will find a great blog that nearly a half million people have read.

Go to Brianhayden.net for all stuff ME!

Thanks for taking a moment out of your day to know more about me, and my work.

Brian has also made videos on the dangers of smoking. See below.

 

 

Communicate With The Dead -ReBlog…


feathers

Today I am reblogging an article by Judith Fein. She was kind enough to give me permission to do so.

My mother died two months ago. Before her passing, I asked her on three separate occasions to send me a sign in the form of white feathers. The first time she sneered. The second time she rolled her eyes. And the third time she didn’t answer. So I forgot about it.

Communicating with the dead has actually been a secret part of my life for many years. It began when my father died when I was in my senior year of college. I used to go to the cemetery to visit him, and one day, quite unexpectedly, he spoke to me. “Don’t give up your writing either,” he said.

“Either what?” I thought. Why did he talk about writing? I was going to be a college professor. As it turned out, he was right. I didn’t give up my writing and I became a writer.

It happened again when a teacher presented me with an owl feather in a large box at the end of a kundalini yoga class. I wasn’t quite sure how to respond to the gift. I lifted it up, and I saw dead people jumping up and down, wanting to speak.

Then it happened with my dear New Zealand friend when I met her in France. She was looking for the cemetery where her grandfather was buried. All she knew was that he died in the battle of the Somme. We chose one of the many military cemeteries in the area and drove there. When we arrived, feathers lined up in front of us, leading the way to an arch, which was flanked by two books bearing the names of the interred. Her grandfather’s name was among them.

Find the rest here: https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/life-is-trip/201608/yes-you-can-communicate-the-dead

Have you ‘spoken’ to a loved one that has passed?

Have you experienced ‘messages’ from those who have crossed over?