Category Archives: life experience

Genres of Literature – Autobiography

Often written in narrative form an autobiography gives the history of a person’s life, written or told by that person.
The definition states: 
“he or she gives a vivid description of his or her childhood in their autobiography” Sub sections are memoirs, life story, or personal history.
It differentiates from the periodic self-reflective mode of journal or diary writing because it is a review of a life from a particular moment in time, rather than a diary entry, which although reflective moves through a series of moments in time. In other words an autobiography takes stock of the writers life by way of memory from the moment of the composition. A distinction on autobiography versus memoir is that a memoir is less focused on self and more on others.
The ‘life’ autobiography may focus on a subjective view of the person’s life, which in some cases can lead to misleading or incorrect information by way of the inability or unwillingness of the writer to recall memories accurately.
A ‘spiritual’ autobiography follows the writer’s journey towards God or other deity, which resulted from a conversion. It is a vehicle to endorse his or her new found religion.
A ‘fictional autobiography’ is a novel about a fictional character written as though the character were writing their own autobiography in first-person and reflecting on both internal and external experiences of their character.

An I-Novel is a Japanese literary genre used to describe a confessional type literature where the events related correspond to the author’s life. In many cases it exposed the darker side of society or the author’s own dark side.

A memoir differs from an autobiography as it focuses on more intimate memoirs, feelings and emotions, rather than the ‘life and times’ of a writer in a typical autobiography. For example, memoirs about politicians or military leaders glorify their public exploits.

Have you written or are you thinking of writing your autobiography?

Whose autobiography have you read that you enjoyed?

I still vividly remember reading The Dairy of A Young Girl (Anne Frank) at school. It is such a powerful and emotive book. Of course, I have read ‘On Writing’ by Stephen King several times (or more!) 





Writing Prompt Wednesday


List a few phobias you have. When and how did you discover you had these?


My ‘phobia’s’ are rather bizarre to say the least. Firstly, as a child I had a recurring nightmare, which was so vivid I would wake with terrible stomach and back pain. The source was a rhino’s horn penetrating my body! In the dream I was at a fancy ‘garden’ party with marquees, waiters, lavish tables, musicians – the works. I was still young and attended with my parents. The setting was Africa on the boundary of the wilderness. (I was born in South Africa).

A rhino thundered towards the garden party scattering the guests in all directions, it also pierced through me as it exited the scene. I could feel the horn through my body and the jarring as the animal ran across the savanna. I could hear screams behind me as the guests realized my predicament. This is the moment I would wake up.

Many, many years later, when my daughter, a born animal whisper wanted to visit the rhino house at Longleat Safari Park, UK, I tried to get her to go on her own. Up to that point I couldn’t even look at a rhino photo images on the TV. She was insistent I went with her to stroke the animal. As we entered the rhino house my fear grew. My daughter went up to the rhino, who was leaning against the massive metal bars and patted it’s hide. She held my hand as I did the same. It’s hide is incredibly solid and rough and I was amazed at how it felt. This encounter lessened my childhood fear in a way I did not think possible. I can look at rhino’s now but still find I turn away when the images are of a charging bull rhino.


My second ‘phobia’ became apparent once I became a mother. The feelings of love and protection were (and are) so intense that I worry about my children’s safety and well-being. Even now when they are adult’s, I still worry about them (I am often teased because of it but the ‘cord’ is never cut – as we mother’s know only too well). Again I had recurring nightmares of this situation, which in a dreamscape is perfectly reasonable, of course. Bearing in mind at the time I was living in England and the situation was far from possible, the dreams were all too real to me.

Once again the dreams were vivid and I had the sensation of the bitter cold. Upon waking I would be shivering. The dream situated me with my two small children on a mountain side where an avalanche roared down towards us. I grabbed a child under each arm and ran to a rocky outcrop, where I held them tight under the overhang. As tonnes of snow poured over us I clung as tightly as I could to ensure each child was not ripped from my grasp.

Once the torrent ceased, we were buried in a capsule of snow and ice with a small pocket of space around us. As time passed, we became colder and colder and I understood I had to find a way to keep my children warm. (Now remember this is a dream and anything is possible in a dream!) I had the children put their feet and hands on my torso and that worked for a while but I could feel my extremities heat lessening. So the best way to keep the children warm was to put them ‘inside’ me where it was very warm. I cut my torso open and made the children crawl inside.

This is the moment I would wake up.

So now you have a glimpse at my psyche – how about you share too?

Genres of Literature – Speculative Fiction

spec fiction

Speculative fiction

Speculative fiction is included in a broad category, which includes science fiction, fantasy, alternate histories (which may have no particular scientific or futuristic component), and even literary stories that contain fantastic elements. It can also be categorized, in some instances with magic realism. In truth speculative fiction is an umbrella genre encompassing narrative fiction with supernatural or futuristic elements.

The genre ranges from ancient works to paradigm-changing and neotraditional works of the 21st century. It is recognized in the author’s intentions or social contexts within the story versions commonly known. The genre was previously termed historical invention (I personally like this term) as characters from various time periods were within the same narrative. And other terms used were mythopoesis or mythopoeia, meaning fictional speculation.

In general it is the creation of a hypothetical history, explanation or ahistorical storytelling. It is not a ‘new’ genre by any means with the genre being used by ancient Greek writers through to the mid 20th century. In its broadest sense the genre captures both conscious and unconscious aspects of human psychology in making sense of the world, and responding to it by creating imaginative, inventive, and artistic expressions.

Interestingly according to publisher statistics, men outnumber women about two to one among English-language speculative fiction writers aiming for professional publication. However, the percentages vary considerably by genre, with women outnumbering men in the fields of urban fantasy, paranormal romance and young adult fiction.

My current work in progress manuscript is a speculative fiction. Life in Slake Patch is set in an alternative future, where the devastation of a World War resulted in the majority of the male population perishing. This created a world-wide matriarchal society.

LifeinSlakePatch 001

Have you written a speculative fiction story/novel?

Care to share the details below in the comments?

And one last note as I found this delightful snippet of information after I had posted on science fiction on 15th January.


The story was “True History” by Lucian.

Writing Prompt Wednesday


Have you ever experienced something that just could not be logically explained?

This event happened when I was about nine or ten years old. My father was driving the car with my mother in the front seat and my three siblings and I in the back seat. (Years before seat belts!) We were  driving across Bucklebury Common, a familiar place to us all as we lived nearby.

There appeared an object in the clear blue sky that we thought at first was an plane. However, as it drew closer we could all see it was oval in shape, had a dark coloured exterior and did not reflect the sunlight.

My father slowed the car down (there were no other cars on the road) so he could see better and we all stared at the object, which just hung in the air – not moving up or down or in either direction – just perfectly still.

We are convinced it was a UFO but have no way of proving it as my father did not have his camera with him and it was decades before cell phones were invented.

To this day I sometimes reflect on  that experience. The object disappeared as quickly as it had come into view, seemingly in the blink of an eye – surely not a conventional mode of human transport.


Have you had an unexplained event? Why not share in the comments?

Writing Prompt Wednesday


Have you done any research into your ancestors? What interesting surprises have you discovered?

One rather big surprise when researching my maternal ancestry was that my great, great grandfather was transported to Tasmania from Liverpool, England. At the tender age of fifteen he was convicted of stealing a piece of calico and sentence to seven years in Van Diemans Land.

Previously he had stolen two game cocks but had escaped punishment. Who knows what age he was then. The poor lad was on the transport ship, William for 127 days. Many did not survive the journey.

What is astonishing is that he made his way back to England at the age of 38, which was very unusual, most stayed after their sentence was complete (if they survived). But my great great grandfather, married a local girl in Tasmania and brought her back to England with their young daughter.

It shows an incredibly strong character and physical strength to endure.

Do you have an ancestor’s story to share?