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Author Interview – Mandy Eve-Barnett

December 14, 2018
mandyevebarnett


Yep it’s me today due to an author having to postpone her interview. I thought I should try my own interview to see how it felt!

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  1. Does writing energize or exhaust you?

It certainly energizes me, once I am into a story it embraces me in such a way I forget the world around me. My characters carry me along showing me what comes next.

  1. What is your writing Kryptonite?

Knowing which story to write…with so many ideas bouncing around my head it is difficult to pick one and stick to it. If an idea comes to me during another project I have to jot down notes, a paragraph or two to enable me to go back to the current WIP.

Rumble

  1. Did you ever consider writing under a pseudonym?

To date I have not felt the need to be anonymous. I love to share my stories regardless of which genre I am writing.

  1. What other authors are you friends with, and how do they help you become a better writer?

I count myself lucky to have many author friends, whether virtual or local. My writing mentor is Linda Pedley, without her encouragement and support I would not be writing or indeed published. My writing group friends are very important to me as their feedback and fellowship are worth its weight in gold.

Rython Amazon

  1. Do you want each book to stand alone, or are you trying to build a body of work with connections between each book?

I write in multiple genres and go where the story takes me so mainly each book is a stand alone, however I was asked by readers of my fantasy novella, The Rython Kingdom to write a sequel and have written the first draft as part of NaNoWriMo this year.

  1. What was the best money you ever spent as a writer?

Most certainly getting my books published with Dream Write Publishing. I was an integral part of the process and my vision for each book has been created.

Ockleberries

  1. What was an early experience where you learned that language had power?

I was lucky to have parents who encouraged reading from a young age and allowed my imagination to flourish through the portals of magic – books.

  1. What’s your favorite under-appreciated novel?

I may sound like an old record with this one – Ferney by James Long – is the ultimate reincarnation novel for me. I re-read it on a regular basis.

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  1. As a writer, what would you choose as your mascot/avatar/spirit animal?

I have an affinity with tigers – solitary when they want but will protect their young with their life.

  1. How many unpublished and half-finished books do you have?

Goodness, let’s see a novella sequel, a steampunk novel, a western romance, a suspense/thriller and a possible short story collection.

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  1. What does literary success look like to you?

To have readers respond to me after reading one of my novels to say they enjoyed the story. Of course I would like one made into a movie but knowing my words are out in the world forever gives me a kick.

  1. What kind of research do you do, and how long do you spend researching before beginning a book?

It depends on the genre, for example for my thriller I had to research how a body could dry up. While for my western romance I had to delve into barrel racing. Both of these took some time during the writing of each book.

Clickety Click

  1. How many hours a day/week do you write?

This depends on how many events, writers and board meetings I have as well as if there is a deadline but I try to write for several hours each week. My constant writing is creating three blog posts per week.

  1. How do you select the names of your characters?

I look at the genre, geographical location and era of the narrative and the characteristics of the particular personality.

  1. Why did you choose to write in your particular field or genre?  If you write more than one, how do you balance them?

The stories pick the genre, I follow the narrative and the genre becomes clear the deeper we go into the characters personalities.

Creature Hunt

  1. How long have you been writing?

I began writing later in life so only around eight years. I have been making up for lost time ever since!

  1. What inspires you?  

A sentence heard or read, a picture, a writing prompt, a vista or an article on a fascinating subject. Inspiration comes from many avenues and I grasp them with both hands.

  1. How do you find or make time to write?

I am quite structured in regard to my writing blog as I need to post three times a week so will write all three most commonly on Sundays. When it comes to fiction I tend to go in bursts so will hide myself away at my writing desk and let the words flow. If an idea hits me I will write until I feel I have the narrative captured.

  1. What projects are you working on at the present?

I participated in NaNoWriMo this year and my plan was to write two novellas, however although one concluded nicely the other has grown beyond novella length already so will be a novel. Both of these will require editing and revision during 2019, which means my other two novels will get pushed back.

  1. What do your plans for future projects include?

As above I have two NaNoWriMo projects to conclude but also have two other novels on the backburner. I am also considering a short story collection at come point.

  1. Share a link to your author website.

www.mandyevebarnett.com

Collaborations:

 


I am happy to be a guest on Stephanie’s blog today:

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Happy Sunday, writers and readers! I am so pleased to introduce you to writer Mandy Eve-Barnett! We connected several years ago, as we both are writers and bloggers. Being in touch with and staying current with other writers is important as it helps push you and keeps you abreast of what others who share the […]

via Guest Blogger: Author and Writer Mandy Eve-Barnett on NaNoWriMo — Steph’s Scribe

Genres of Literature – Milesian Tale

September 3, 2018
mandyevebarnett


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A Milesian tale  is a genre of fictional story prominent in ancient Greek and Roman literature, it is a short story, fable, or folktale featuring love and adventure, usually of an erotic or titillating nature. It can be found in medieval collections of tales such as the Gesta Romanorum, the Decameron of Boccaccio, and the Heptameron of Marguerite of Navarre”.

One definition of this genre is: a type of first-person novel, a travelogue told from memory by a narrator, who every now and then would relate how he encountered other characters who in turn, told him stories, which he would then incorporate into the main tale through the rhetorical technique of narrative impersonation. This resulted in a complicated narrative fabric: a travelogue carried by a main narrator with numerous subordinate tales carried by subordinate narrative voices.

The best complete example of this would be Apuleius’s The Golden Ass, a Roman novel written in the second century of the Common Era. Apuleius introduces his novel with the words “At ego tibi sermone isto Milesio varias fabulas conseram” (“But let me join together different stories in that Milesian style”), which suggests not each story is a Milesian tale, but rather the entire joined-together collection. The idea of the Milesian tale also served as a model for the episodic narratives strung together in Petronius’s Satyricon.

Aristides’s Milesian Tale
The name Milesian tale originates from the Milisiaka of Aristides of Miletus, who was a writer of shameless and amusing tales notable for their salacious content and unexpected plot twists. Aristides set his tales in Miletus, which had a reputation for a luxurious, easy-going lifestyle.

Milesian tales quickly gained a reputation for ribaldry: Ovid, in Tristia, contrasts the boldness of Aristides and others with his own Ars Amatoria, for which he was punished by exile. In the dialogue on the kinds of love, Erotes, Lucian of Samosata, praised Aristides in passing, saying that after a day of listening to erotic stories he felt like Aristides, “that enchanting spinner of bawdy yarns”. 

Though the idea of the Milesian tale served as a model for the episodic narratives strung together in The Satyricon by Gaius Petronius Arbiter and The Golden Ass by Lucius Apuleius (second century CE), neither Aristides’s original Greek text nor the Latin translation survived. The lengthiest survivor from this literature is the tale of “Cupid and Psyche”, found in Apuleius.

Aristidean saucy and disreputable heroes and spicy, fast-paced anecdote resurfaced in the medieval fabliaux. Chaucer’s “The Miller’s Tale” is in Aristides’ tradition, as are some of the saltier tales in Boccaccio’s Decameron or the Heptameron of Margaret of Angoulême.

So in short, erotic literature is certainly not new! Although I do not read this specific genre, I have written some ‘erotic’ scenes in The Twesome Loop. It was not planned but ‘directed’ by a couple of the characters.

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Do you read or write erotica? 

 

Writing Hub -Books, Writing, Tips & more…

May 31, 2017
mandyevebarnett


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Writing

I plan on immersing myself in the ghost writing project for the rest of this and most likely next week. It needs to be propelled forward so a final draft can be approved. A graphic designer is working on the images so the placement of these will have to be worked out as well. With possible sizes of print books and price estimates from the publisher we are nearing a conclusion in the next month. An exciting time for both my client and I as we all know when we hold a physical copy of our book for the first time it is magical and awe inspiring.

However, prior to that schedule, I invested in a workshop last night for my writing. A local author, Jennifer Snow is currently writer in residence at a downtown bookstore, Audrey’s and she was holding a workshop, which intrigued me. The evening’s workshop title was – First Five Pages & Avoiding a Saggy Middle in your Novel.

There were several other writers attending and it was interesting to hear their questions and the advice given by Jennifer. Although you may not write in the same genre as the presenter or the other attendees at workshops or conferences, there are basic fundamentals required to entice, engage and hold a reader no matter the narrative.

We all need to invest in our writing, no matter how much we think we know. You can always learn from another writer or author and as it happens I did have an idea pop into my head during the evening, which will assist in the revision of one of my manuscripts. (For those of you who don’t know I am editing four manuscripts over this and next year!) I detail my progress here: https://mandyevebarnett.com/current-project-2/

Books

Reincarnation by Suzanne Weyn

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My review:
What a wonderful book – stories of life, death and rebirth. Perfectly linking each of the souls/characters lives. Sometimes they linked up, others not. Suzanne weaved a perfect tale of past lives making great use of the ‘echoes’ of past life bringing them forward to the new existence.

If you are intrigued, interested or fascinated by reincarnation you must read this book.

Evidence of Life by Barbara Taylor Sissel   

Onto this novel – a great opening line and the story propels you forward with enticing glimpses of what might have happened.

Evidence of Life

Writing Tips

Invest in a few valuable resources starting with The Chicago Manual of Style and The Elements of Style.

Grammar: learn the rules and then learn how to break them effectively.

Do you have particular resources you use? Care to share?

What ‘writing rules’ have you broken?

Writing Hub -Books, Writing, Tips & more…

May 10, 2017
mandyevebarnett


writing-hub

Writing:

Certainly a non productive writing weekend as I attended a reptile show both days (see previous post https://mandyevebarnett.com/2017/05/08/upcoming-writing-events-add-yours-for-your-location-14/). However, I do have this weekend free so will indulge in as much time as possible writing. This will include a complete revision of the ghost written book project prior to sending back to my client.

I have my writing retreat to look forward and it is getting tantalizingly close – 18th May. Here I can immerse myself completely with no distractions, unless I actually seek them out.

Books:

Her Fearful Symmentry by Audrey Niffenegger. I am thoroughly enjoying this story. The characters are well rounded, there is a connection/distance between the two main characters, which gives the narrative an undercurrent of possibilities.

Symmentry

Reincarnation by Suzanne Weyn (because you all know by now I’m fascinated by this subject)

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What are you reading?

I watched this movie, which had a great twist on the subject. I am always intrigued by the variations on the reincarnation theme.

the-discovery

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt5155780/

Writing Tips from the Master – Stephen King

“You cannot hope to sweep someone else away by the force of your writing until it has been done to you.”

“Description begins in the writer’s imagination, but should finish in the reader’s.”

“I think the best stories always end up being about the people rather than the event, which is to say character-driven.”

“Let’s get one thing clear right now, shall we? There is no Idea Dump, no Story Central, no Island of the Buried Bestsellers; good story ideas seem to come quite literally from nowhere, sailing at you right out of the empty sky: two previously unrelated ideas come together and make something new under the sun. Your job isn’t to find these ideas but to recognize them when they show up.”

What’s your favorite King quote or writing tip?

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