Category Archives: writers

Writing Prompt Wednesday


Today’s prompt is two-fold. Firstly, a theme: A Fall Walk and secondly, words to include: bird, wheel, envelope.

147cbbac82b9e19e53c118c39afddb9f--autumn-leaves-autumn-fall

Here is my response:

Gerald replaced the letter into the envelope, folded it in half and pushed into his jacket pocket. With a scarf wrapped tightly around his neck to keep the fall chill from creeping in, he pulled on gloves and his heavy hiking boots.

“I’m just popping out for some fresh air, Martha.”

“All right, dear, the soup will take about two hours, so don’t go too far.”

Gerald tutted under his breath. Martha always had a schedule and woe betide you if you didn’t keep to it. He called back as he exited the warmth of the house and entered the golden hued avenue.

“I’ll be on time, Martha.”

With determined steps, he walked along the treed avenue focused on his destination. Turning a corner a bird flew upward from its foraging in the leaf litter startling him.

“Silly bird!” he turned to follow the bird’s flight path and tripped. Stumbling with hands outstretched to save himself. One hand became entangled in the wheel of a bicycle and Gerald and the rider crumpled into a heap on the verge.

“Oh my God! I’m so sorry. I tried to stop when I saw you falling but wasn’t quick enough. Are you okay?” The young man’s voice was tense with worry.

“Just a bit shocked. Although, I think I may have hurt my hand.”

“Let me see. Can you take off the glove?”

Gerald pulled at the woollen material and winched.

“Oh, that doesn’t look good. I’m going to call an ambulance.”

“It’s just bruised, an ice pack will suffice, I’m sure.”

“Well you will have to do that quickly. I should come with you to make sure it is not more serious. I’m a doctor.”

Gerald looked at the young man- how can you be a doctor? You look as though you’re in high school. Not wanting to be rude, Gerald kept his thoughts to himself.

“I live just up here. It’s not necessary to come – really.”

“I insist.”

Gerald let the doctor accompany him home. Martha, of course, made a huge fuss. The envelope’s content would have to wait another day.

Genres of Literature – Literary Nonsense


nonsense

Literary nonsense (or nonsense literary) is a category of literature, which balances elements that make sense with some that do not by an excess of meaning, rather than the lack of it. The most well-known form is nonsense verse and is present in many forms of literature. The nonsensical nature of this genre defines its humor, rather than wit or the typical punchline of a joke.  

Certain formal elements of language and logic facilitate the meanings of the piece and are balanced by elements that negate meaning. These formal elements include semantics, syntax, phonetics, context, representation, and formal diction. For a text to be within the genre of literary nonsense, it must have an abundance of nonsense techniques woven into the fabric of the piece. This is created by the use of faulty cause and effect, portmanteau, neologism, reversals and inversions, imprecision (including gibberish), simultaneity, picture/text incongruity, arbitrariness, infinite repetition, negativity or mirroring, and misappropriation. Nonsense tautology, reduplication, and absurd precision.

The genre has been recognized since the nineteenth century derived from two broad artistic sources. Firstly, oral folk tradition, including games, rhymes and songs, such as nursery rhymes. For example, Hey Diddle Diddle and Mother Goose. Secondly, the intellectual absurdities of scholars, court poets and other intellectuals who created sophisticated nonsense forms of religious travesties, political satire and Latin parodies. They are separate from  the pure satire and parody by their exaggerated nonsensical effects.

Today the genre is a combination of both of these methods. A popular writer, Edward Lear used this genre in his limericks. Other nonsense literature examples are The Owl and the Pussycat, The Dong with a Luminous Nose, The Jumblies,  and The Story of the Four Little Children Who Went Around the World. Flann O’Brien’s The Third Policeman, can be considered a nonsense novel.

A favorite of mine is Lewis Carroll’s Jabberwocky – it is a quintessential nonsense poem.

Jabberwocky-main

Do you have a favorite nonsense story or poem?

 

Writing Prompt Wednesday


mermaid

 

Inspired by the news story headline: ‘mermaid tails emerge from washing machines at a laundromat in LA’ I thought it was perfect for a word prompt.

Let’s see where it takes your imagination.

 

Genres of Literature – Subterranean Fiction


subterran

Subterranean fiction is actually a sub-genre of adventure fiction or science fiction, focusing on underground settings, sometimes at the center of the Earth or otherwise deep below the surface of another planet. The genre is based on the theory of a hollow earth. The earliest works were Enlightenment-era philosophical or allegorical works, where the underground setting was often incidental. In the late 19th century, however, more pseudoscientific or proto-science-fictional motifs gained prevalence.

Common themes include depictions of an underground world that is more primitive than the surface, either culturally, technologically or biologically, or  a combination of these. The earlier stories usually saw the setting used as a venue for sword-and-sorcery fiction, while the latter stories featured extinct creatures, such as dinosaurs, hominids or cryptids living free. A less frequent theme has the underground world technologically advanced, typically either as the refugium of a lost civilization, or even a sanctuary for space aliens.

Some of the earliest novels were: Ludvig Holberg’s 1741 novel Nicolai Klimii iter subterraneum (Niels Klim’s Underground Travels) and Giacomo Casanova’s 1788 Icosameron (a 5-volume, 1800-page story of a brother and sister who fall into the Earth and discover the subterranean utopia of the Mégamicres, a race of multicolored, hermaphroditic dwarfs.

More recent novels have been The City of Ember (2003) by Jeanne DuPrau – a city built underground to survive a nuclear holocaust and Tunnels by Roderick Gordon and Brian Williams – tells of a hollow Earth with an interior sun, in which multiple civilizations exist within and beneath the crust.

As a genre it is not a common theme.

Do you read this genre? Have you written this genre?

 

 

Writing Prompt Wednesday


postcardprompts

I found a fun prompt exercise I thought would be fun to share. Find postcards (or virtual ones) and write about the person writing them and/or the person receiving them. It can be any era, location or relationship.

I wrote this one: Fate on a Postcard

Justine pushed the hotel information booklet to one side and spread out her purchased postcards on the small desk. With a glass of red wine to her right and an open window to her left overlooking the piazza, she made her choice of recipient for each postcard.
A view of the cathedral for her mother, she knew her strongly Catholic mother would love the adornments, the statues and grandeur. For her brother she chose a view of the harbour full of fishing boat, nets and curvy young women flirting with burly rugged fishermen. He had always wanted to go sea fishing but being confined to a wheelchair did not make his wish easily granted. She wrote quickly filling in the available space with her smallest writing, trying to convey the beauty, aromas, atmosphere and the bustle of people in Capri.
She took a long sip of wine and looked at the bustle of cafes below her hotel window. The aroma of garlic, coffee and dry stone invaded her nostrils.
Justine looked at the last postcard with its scenes of Capri and couldn’t help but remember the last conversation she had with Marco. Now she understood her fear of leaving England for him. A man she had only known for four months. But now she was confident and sure – it was the right thing to do. She paced back and forth compiling her words and then dismissing them. With a deep breath she put pen to paper.
Dearest Marco,
I do love you. I will marry you. I am here in Capri. Come to the piazza Cordon at eight tonight.
Your love. Your heart. Justine X
So she did not second guess her decision yet again she walked swiftly from her room to the reception and asked for directions to Marco’s workplace. Timing her arrival at siesta, she placed the postcard on the table outside the small store and walked away to find the post office, the receptionist had advised her about. Now she would wait. Her fate on the back of a postcard.

Now you have a go! Have fun.