Tag Archives: children’s books

Author Interview Beth Rowe


Author-Interview-Button

Beth_-_color

  1. Does writing energize or exhaust you?

While I am writing I feel energized but it often leaves me exhausted afterwards. I get excited about an idea and can’t wait to see where it goes but almost feel deflated when I get it on paper.

2. Did you ever consider writing under a pseudonym?

No, I want to be known for what I write and not have people guessing.

3. What other authors are you friends with, and how do they help you become a better writer?

             I have many writer friends in the Writers Foundation who work to help writers improve their work. They encourage, make suggestions on changes one might make and help promote work.

Beth cover

4. Do you want each book to stand alone, or are you trying to build a body of work with connections between each book?

         I work in many different genres, so each of my books stands alone at this point. I want to keep it that way for the foreseeable future.

5. What was the best money you ever spent as a writer?

Membership in the Writers Foundation

6. As a writer, what would you choose as your mascot/avatar/spirit animal?

I think the dragonfly would be my mascot. It represents so many things. It is like a fairy spirit.

7. How many unpublished and half-finished books do you have?

Right now only one. 

Mischief

8. What does literary success look like to you?

       I feel if even a few people enjoy what I have written I am a success. If I make a small influence on someone’s thinking I have achieved something.

9. What kind of research do you do, and how long do you spend researching before beginning a book?

      It depends on the book. If I want the book to be so fictional it could happen anywhere and there aren’t facts that are in question then I spend very little time. One of the next books I will work on requires a lot of research in order to make it real. I want to make sure the reader will feel sure the events could really happen. I also don’t want to be using a cliched format.

10. How many hours a day/week do you write?

     I try to write something every day but it doesn’t always work out. Having a deadline helps push me. It is difficult when I am ghostwriting if I am waiting for information. Then things can get behind.

11. How do you select the names of your characters?

     I have a hard time with the names. I start with what pops into my head but sometimes I have to change them if they don’t fit the time period or if I find I have chosen names that seem too similar such as same first letters. I became conscious of that in one book I read where the two male characters had names starting with the same first two letters and it became confusing.

12. Why did you choose to write in your particular field or genre? If you write in more than one how do you balance them?

       With my first book, the genre was chosen by my professor as it began with a class assignment. My second book followed that genre. I decided I wanted to try mystery as I enjoy reading murder mysteries but at the same time I felt a need for a young children’s book so I ended up working on the two simultaneously.

I dont want to go

13. How long have you been writing?

     Although my first book started about twenty years ago, I feel I have actually seriously been writing for about six years.

14. What inspires you?

     I can’t say any one thing inspires me. Sometimes it is a story I have read. Other times it is some event I have been at. It could be a conversation with someone or something I saw while on a trip.

15. How do you find or make time to write?

     To begin with it was difficult for me. Now I have an office where all the things I need are well-arranged so I can go in and shut the door if I have to. Then the worst thing is telephone interruptions.

death

16. What projects are you working on at the present time?

A science fiction novel and a ghost writing project.

     I have two books I am ghostwriting. The next project is going to be an outer space science fiction story which I have begun the research on and have an outline in mind.

17. What do your plans for future projects include?

     Once I do the sci-fi book I want to work on some more children’s stories. I may consider a sequel to the sci-fi depending on how it goes.

18. Share a link to your author website.

https://www.albertaauthors.ca/Authors/Rowe/Beth

Bio:

Beth was born in Denmark and moved to Canada when she was two. Raised in Red Deer, she completed her schooling at Lindsay Thurber Composite High. She received her Bachelor of Education Degree from the University of Alberta in 1971. Her teaching career took her north to the Peace River country where she met her husband-to-be. Moving to High Prairie, they raised two daughters. Finally settling in Sherwood Park, she was a substitute teacher for many years. During this time she began to write. Beth is a director on the board for the Writers Foundation of Strathcona County (WFSC) and currently produces the group’s monthly newsletter. Beth has five grandchildren and enjoys spending time with them.

 

 

Genres of Literature – Picture Book


childrens-literature-1-638

A picture book combines visual and verbal narratives aimed at young children with the pictures being prominent rather than the text, which is written with vocabulary a child can understand but not necessarily read.  Therefore, picture books have two functions for children: firstly they are read to young children by adults, and then later children read them once they begin learning to read.

Well known children’s books include Beatrix Potter’s The Tale of Peter Rabbit, Dr. Seuss’ The Cat In The Hat, and Maurice Sendak’s Where the Wild Things Are.

Which was your childhood favorite?

From the mid-1960’s several children’s literature awards have included a category for picture books. However, some picture books are published with content aimed at older children or even adults. Tibet: Through the Red Box, by Peter Sis, is one example of a picture book aimed at an adult audience.

My first published book was a picture book, Rumble’s First Scare. Not because it was easier but rather the subject matter appealed as a unique children’s story. The POV of a monster coming from underground on All Hallow’s Eve to ‘scare’ the children. However, Rumble is much too cute to be really scary. 

Rumble

Do you write children’s books? Care to share in the comments?

 

Author Interview Sarah Nachin


Author-Interview-Button

sarah

  1. Does writing energize or exhaust you?

Writing definitely energizes me. I get so wrapped up in my writing sometimes that I lose track of time.

  1. What is your writing Kryptonite?

My writing Kryptonite is disorganization and procrastination.

  1. Did you ever consider writing under a pseudonym?

No. I like my name. It’s kind of different and I want people to get to know me as a writer under that name.

  1. What other authors are you friends with, and how do they help you become a better writer?

Jerry Cowling is a published author who has helped me immensely when it comes to editing my books. Archie Scott is another writer. I can bounce ideas off him and he has a wealth of knowledge on many subjects which broadens my horizons.

camel

  1. Do you want each book to stand alone, or are you trying to build a body of work with connections between each book?

Each book I’ve written has been in a different genre, so for the most part they stand alone. However, I am planning a sequel to my first book, so there will be a tie-in between the first book and the sequel.

  1. What was the best money you ever spent as a writer?

Traveling to Europe, which became the inspiration for my third book.

  1. What was an early experience where you learned that language had power?

Having my parents help me write reports when I was in grade school and having them show me how to use my imagination to make the reports more interesting.

  1. What’s your favorite under-appreciated novel?

“A Prayer for Owen Meany.” It’s not well-known, but it really moved me.

  1. As a writer, what would you choose as your mascot/avatar/spirit animal?

An eagle because they soar high in the sky and symbolize freedom

  1. How many unpublished and half-finished books do you have?

Three

  1. What does literary success look like to you?

Having people appreciate and enjoy my work

51fBYkaoA+L._SX348_BO1,204,203,200_

  1. What kind of research do you do, and how long do you spend researching before beginning a book?

I haven’t really done any research for any of my books. My first two were based on interviews with people I met. My third book was based on my experiences traveling in Europe. 

  1. How many hours a day/week do you write?

On the average two-three hours a day.

  1. How do you select the names of your characters?

Only one of my books is fiction. I selected fairly common names that were similar to the names of the actual people I based the characters on. 

  1. What was your hardest scene to write?

Since all my books are either non-fiction or fiction based on actual experiences, I really haven’t had any difficult scenes to write because I didn’t have to really imagine the circumstances. They were actual events.

  1. Why did you choose to write in your particular field or genre?  If you write more than one, how do you balance them?

I feel very comfortable writing non-fiction, but I am spreading my wings, so to speak, and branching out into fiction. I like the change of pace that fiction offers – the fact that I can use my imagination, so it’s not difficult to balance the different genres. 

long

  1. How long have you been writing?

Since I was about 10 years old

  1. What inspires you?

People and events inspire me, especially people who have overcome odds and accomplished something. Events that have shaped our world also inspire me.   

  1. How do you find or make time to write?

I get up early in the morning and write while I’m fresh and don’t have any distractions.

  1. What projects are you working on at the present?

I’m working on a self-help book and also an historical novel.

  1. What do your plans for future projects include?

Finishing my self-help book and my novel and writing a cookbook. 

  1. Share a link to your author website.

I don’t have a website, but my Facebook page is https://www.facebook.com/Sarah-J-Nachin-Author-273249936028795/

Also here is the link to my books on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=sarah+nachin

Bio:

Sarah J. Nachin is an author, freelance writer, speaker and blogger. Her most recent book is the “The Odyssey of Clyde the Camel” She has also published two non-fiction works. “Ordinary Heroes, Anecdotes of Veterans”relates stories of men and women who served in the military during five decades of conflict – World War II, Korea, Vietnam, and Desert Storm. “The Long Journey,” co-authored with Felicia McCranie, is an inspiring story of a woman who grew up in the Philippines, immigrated to the United States and overcame almost insurmountable obstacles. Sarah J. Nachin also writes for two weekly newspapers and a chamber of commerce magazines produced by Heron Publishing. She has two blogs. Sarah also works as an editor and proof reader, specializing in working with writers whose native language is not English. She is a public speaker, as well.

Blog Tour – Simon Rose


Simon Rose

My guest today is Simon Rose, author of many novels and nonfiction books for children and young adults. His latest novel, Parallel Destiny, has just been released.

So tell us about the new book

Parallel Destiny is the third part of the paranormal Flashback trilogy. The first instalment, entitled Flashback, was published in 2015 and the second, Twisted Fate, was published in 2017.

The trilogy features ghosts, psychics, alternate timelines, parallel universes, and Project Mindstorm, a secret operation involving deadly mind control experiments, as Max and Julia investigate events concealed for over twenty years.  

Flashback_front

Parallel Destiny takes place immediately after the events depicted in Twisted Fate. Project Mindstorm no longer exists and Kane and his associates no longer represent a danger. However, Max and Julia now have to contend with the sinister Alastair Hammond and his experiments into the existence of parallel universes and alternate realities. Marooned within a bewildering series of multiple universes, Max and Julia are forced to fight for their own survival and to save the very fabric of reality from Hammond’s deadly scheme.

Will there be any more books in the series?

I’m not sure. Right now I’m not planning on any more since the story has reached a logical conclusion. However, Flashback was originally going to be a single novel and I didn’t consider sequels until later, so you never know. I think there’s certainly some potential to write something else in this genre featuring the two main characters, but I guess time will tell.

You don’t seem to have any shortage of ideas. Where do you get them all from?

Ideas come from anywhere and everywhere really. Books, movies, TV, online research, out walking the dog, dreams, an overheard conversation, friends and family, history, mythology, and so many other sources. I have a few ideas that may never come to anything, but I still keep them anyway. It’s always a good plan to save them because you never know if, or when, an idea might fit into a story. My first four novels were all very early story ideas and were the first books to be published. However, more recently published novels, such as The Sphere of Septimus and the Flashback series, were also very early ideas for novels. They just took longer to develop as novels. Flashback was also one of my earliest ideas but again it took a while for me to develop the initial story, and consequently the rest of the series. Even if the ideas don’t work right away, they might in the future and you just never know when you’ll get another piece of the puzzle.

Twisted Fate main

What other novels have you written? 

I’ve written fifteen novels so far, since the first one came out in 2003. The Sorcerer’s Letterbox and The Heretic’s Tomb are historical fiction adventures set in medieval England, – The Alchemist’s Portrait is a time travel story, The Emerald Curse is all about superheroes and comic books, The Doomsday Mask is all about the legend of Atlantis, and The Sphere of Septimus involves the characters traveling into another world and is in the same vein as the Harry Potter series, The Chronicles of Narnia, or Lord of the Rings. Future Imperfect is a technology-driven story featuring mysterious messages from the future and The Time Camera about a myserious device that captures images of different historical periods, and The Clone Conspiracy features secret experiments into human cloning. The Shadowzone series featuring ShadowzoneInto The Web, and Black Dawn, was published last year. The series involves the discovery of a grim dystopian version of Earth that’s ruled by a totalitarian dictatorship, the threat of a deadly virus, and a race against time to save the lives of millions.

I’ve also written seven nonfiction guides for writers, including The Children’s Writer’s Guide, The Time Traveler’s Guide, and The Working Writer’s Guide. 

Are these your favourite genres in which to write? 

Yes, there are certain genres that I like. When I first read the Harry Potter books, I knew that they were written for the age range, style, and had the level of danger and excitement for young readers that I was aiming for with the many story ideas that I had at the time.

However, as much as I enjoyed all the Harry Potter books, I wasn’t interested in writing my own story ideas on themes like folklore, mythology, magic wands, witches and wizards, or mythological creatures and monsters. Instead, I wanted my stories to be about the sort of things that I enjoyed reading about. These included time travel, fantasy, history, science fiction, lost cities, superheroes, other worlds, parallel universes, and the paranormal, and those are the types of stories I’ve been writing ever since. 

So is it true that authors should write what they know? 

In some ways yes, although this might sound a little odd because no one actually knows how to travel in time, attend a wizard school, visit other dimensions, have super powers, or go to the edge of the universe, at least as far as we know anyway. But what this term actually means is that it’s much easier to write about what you know or about what you’re interested in. You’ll have far more ideas about your own favorite topics and you’ll also decide exactly what you want to write about and not just try to do the same as everyone else or follow a hot new trend, whether it’s teenage wizards, vampires, zombies, or something else. If you write about unfamiliar topics, you’ll have to do more research for a story or perhaps plan out the story a lot more, rather than letting the ideas from your imagination flow into the computer or onto the paper as the story keeps coming to you. Writing about things that you’re not passionate about will seem much more like work, when writing is supposed to be fun. Write about what you know and love and it’s going to be a much more enjoyable experience.

Have you worked with lots of other authors? 

Yes quite a lot over the last few years, in many different genres. This has involved both substantive and copy editing of completed novels, but I also work as a coach for writers with works in progress. Some of the projects I’ve worked on that have subsequently been published are here on my website. You can also see some of the references and recommendations from other clients that I’ve worked with.

What are you currently working on?  

I’m always working on something but currently I’m writing a number of nonfiction books and doing quite a lot of editing and coaching work with other authors, helping them with their novels, short stories, or works in progress. I’m also working on a historical fiction novel set in the turbulent era of the English Civil War in the 1640s and I hope to be able to focus on that a little more in the coming months. 

ParallelDestiny_front

Where can a reader purchase your latest book? 

Parallel Destiny is available in paperback and as an ebook worldwide on Amazon, KoboBarnes & NobleiBooks, and Indigo Chapters in Canada, and at many other locations online. Your local bookstore should also be able to order a copy.

You can learn more about Simon and his work on his website at http://www.simon-rose.com or online at the following social media sites:

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • YouTube
  • Google +
  • Pinterest

Flashback series small

Author Interview – Wendy Hobbs


Author-Interview-Button

Wendy and book

  1. Does writing energize or exhaust you?

My writing energizes me as I love, Claudia Quash, the heroine that I have created. She’s strong and brave and hopefully she inspires people never to give up on their dreams.

  1. What is your writing Kryptonite?

The magical moment in ‘The Spell of Pencliff’ is when Claudia Quash discovers that she has special powers of her own.

  1. Did you ever consider writing under a pseudonym?

No

  1. What other authors are you friends with, and how do they help you become a better writer?

I have connected with many authors through social media, and I think that we all inspire and encourage each other by reading each other’s work and sharing marketing ideas.

  1. Do you want each book to stand alone, or are you trying to build a body of work with connections between each book?

I am developing the ‘Claudia Quash Series.’

  1. What was the best money you ever spent as a writer?

The Spell of Pencliff book cover

Giving away free copies of the ‘Claudia Quash Series’ to children in the hospital to help pass the time. and hopefully inspire them and give them hope.

  1. What was an early experience where you learned that language had power?

I was inspired by the speeches that I read by famous politicians.

  1. What’s your favorite novel?

My favorite novel is Wuthering Heights and it is also my favorite film.

  1. As a writer, what would you choose as your mascot/avatar/spirit animal?

It would have to be the mechanical dog featured in ‘The Spell of Pencliff.’

  1. How many unpublished and half-finished books do you have?

I am currently editing two books at the moment.

  1. What does literary success look like to you?

Literacy success is being able to use the money to help create more special memories for seriously ill children and their families of Dreams and Wishes Charity.

  1. What kind of research do you do, and how long do you spend researching before beginning a book?

I spend a great deal of time researching before I write as Claudia Quash travels back in time and it is important that I know the date of the inventions in ‘The Spell of Pencliff.’

  1. How many hours a day/week do you write?

It depends on how busy I am with book-signing commitments, school visits and promoting Dreams and Wishes Charity, which is very important to me.

  1. How do you select the names of your characters?

Firstly, I imagine what the character will look and act like and what sort of person I am trying to convey, then I choose a name that I think fits his/her personality traits.

  1. What was your hardest scene to write?

The most difficult thing to describe is how things in the book grow bigger and then shrink in size and how it made Claudia Quash feel.

  1. Why did you choose to write in your particular field or genre? 

I love writing magical adventures and Claudia Quash, my chosen protagonist is the character that I became intrigued by. I enjoy the way her personality changes and grows and how she adapts to her different surroundings. At the moment, I don’t have any plans to write under another genre or develop a new character/characters apart from the ones that Claudia meets during her adventures.

  1. How long have you been writing?

After I qualified as a lawyer, I studied for a degree in ‘Theatre Studies and Drama’ and during this time I did a lot of writing and became interested in storytelling. My debut novel, ‘Claudia Quash:The Spell of Pencliff’ took me three years to write.

  1. What inspires you?  

My daughter, also called Claudia has inspired my writing.

  1. How do you find or make time to write?

I write early in the morning, in the evening or whenever I am not busy with the wonderful Dreams and Wishes Charity that grants dreams and wishes to seriously ill children and their families.

  1. What projects are you working on at the present?

I am currently editing the second book in ‘The Spell of Pencliff’ series and completing an activity book.

  1. What do your plans for future projects include?

I am keen to write more short stories for younger children.

BOOK COVER DREAMS&WISHES

  1. Share a link to your author website

‘Claudia Quash : The Spell of Pencliff’ and ‘Claudia’s Special Wish’ are available on Amazon, Kindle, and as an Audiobook and via my website – www.wendyhobbs.com

The Spell of Pencliff   – http://myBook.to/ClaudiaQuash

Claudia’s Special Wish – http://MyBook.to/SpecialWish

Author page – http://author.to/WendyHobbs

ClaudiaQuash/Facebook

Twitter @WendyFHobbs

Bio: WENDY HOBBS, LLB (Hons), BA (Hons), PGCE.

 I am a Lawyer, Ambassador for Dreams and Wishes, and a children’s fantasy author of “The Claudia Quash Series.” My journey began when I took a break from my legal career to study for a degree in Theatre and Drama, and I developed an interest in storytelling. My debut novel, “Claudia Quash:The Spell of Pencliff” has received amazing 5 star reviews, and it won a book award. “The Spell of Pencliff’ is a magical adventure  inspired by my daughter, also called Claudia, and it is based on Tenby (Pencliff), a historic town steeped in ancient history in West Wales. The story features the Tudor Merchant’s House, St Catherine’s Island and the famous Ghost Walk. My aim was to write a story that not only captivated the reader’s imagination, but to create a unique character that encouraged children to pursue their dreams and never to give up.

10 downing street

Last year, I was invited by Mr Tony Curtis MBE, founder of Dreams and Wishes Charity, to write a book to inspire children. I wrote “Claudia’s Special Wish,” which was launched by the Secretary of State for Wales,  and I had the honor of reading the book on behalf of the charity in the House of Commons and in 10 Downing Street.