Tag Archives: debut novel

Author Interview – Marc Watson


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Marc Watson

 1. Does writing energize or exhaust you?
A bit of both, honestly. I feel energized while I’m actually doing the writing, however if I get into it for any more than about an hour then my brain doesn’t like resetting itself and I spend the rest of a day in an exhaustive haze, as if I’d been napping, and I hate naps!

2. What is your writing Kryptonite?

Time, or the lack thereof. I have very little personal time to write, embrace whatever I can get. I don’t have enough, and what I get can be taken away from me so easily.

3. Did you ever consider writing under a pseudonym?
I flirt with it from time to time, but only because there’s already a Marc Watson author (who is a really great guy who is a thrill ride engineer from Florida), as well as one who is a British comedian, and another is the Content Lead for everything Minecraft. All industries I’m involved in. Hmm… maybe I do need one. If I did, it would likely be just adding my middle initials or something simple. I like my name.

4. What other authors are you friends with, and how do they help you become a better writer?
Seeing as I’m relatively new to this world, my list of writer friends is sparse at best. I’ve met a few times with Edmonton horror writer Konn Lavery. I’m currently teamed up with an old friend Patrick Yokan Persaud, who is the lead writer at Hardmode Games.
Konn has been great as he lives nearby and sees a similar world to what I see, books and sales-wise, and Patrick and I grew up together, so if something plays well with him then I know it works for me and the audience I’m trying to reach.

5. Do you want each book to stand alone, or are you trying to build a body of work with connections between each book?
Why not both? I’ve written an interconnected universe with my ‘Ryukyu’ series which will start in March with ‘Catching Hell Pt. 1’, plus I have other stories that loosely tie into it such as my debut novel ‘Death Dresses Poorly’ which makes vague references to the ‘Ryuujin’ world, and then I have works in progress like ’12:13’ that completely stand alone. I don’t think there’s any reason why I can’t be known for stand-alone works as well as my epic fantasy world.

6. What was the best money you ever spent as a writer?
Certainly the cost of attending my first When Words Collide writer’s conference. I only began taking writing seriously on February 29th, 2016. When WWC hit in August, that was my first exposure to a collection of other writers, agents, and like-minded individuals. The experiences and connections I took away from that weekend still resonate with me today.

7. What was an early experience where you learned that language had power?
My ‘words have power’ moment really didn’t come until I was in my late teens. I’d been an avid reader all of my life up to that point, but in a grade 13 English class (reminder I grew up in Ontario, so that’s not weird) we were assigned ‘The Shipping News’ by E. Annie Proulx. The book remains my favorite of all time. I read that book three times during that few weeks of study.
However, while I was getting my mind transformed by this heartbreaking and utterly beautiful story, many in the class admitted repeatedly to not understanding it, not reading it, and generally not caring about it at all. I was simply baffled because I was so engrossed and moved to the point of tears, and all these other kids my age just let it pass them by. It was there that I saw the real power of words: that they mean different things to different people and they always will.

8. What’s your favorite under-appreciated novel?
Well I could say ’The Shipping News’ and I’d stand by it, but it won a Pulitzer Prize so I guess no level of recognition will be enough for me.
So I’d have to say that ‘Wizard and Glass: The Dark Tower 4’ by Stephen King would fit the bill. As a middle part of a monstrously over-arching Dark Tower story, it can be so easily overlooked, but the individual story of a young Roland and his friends encountering the true evil in Roland’s life from that point forward face to face, while also being a beautiful and realistic story of young forbidden love. I just love it. It’s very tight, while offering massive expositional dumps into the mind of such an iconic and enigmatic protagonist.

9. As a writer, what would you choose as your mascot/avatar/spirit animal?
A great question, and a popular one so I’m ready for it! I really have two, and it completely depends on what I’m working on. For my epic fantasy works, I’m very much a house cat. Lazy, slow, methodical, with random fits and starts of energy when I write the action pieces. When writing something like ‘Death Dresses Poorly’, which I smashed out in a tight six weeks, it’s a squirrel: high-energy, fast paced, with no time to slow down.

10. How many unpublished and half-finished books do you have?
Too many… I’m sporadic when it comes to my writing, so I have no issues dropping something for another project I want get into. On the up side, I never ever suffer from writer’s block!
My ‘Ryuujin’ stories in various stages of completion number eight. Side stories are another three.
My standalone stories are at two right now, so doing the math I have thirteen actual and legitimate works in progress. Not just ideas on a napkin. I’m talking works with real words on a page.

11. What does literary success look like to you?
Buying my family a dinner from the profits of my works. Since ‘Death Dresses Poorly’ just came out, and ‘Catching Hell Pt. 1’ is still more than a month away, the checks aren’t rolling in yet so I’m not there. Whether it’s a lot or a little, when I take my beautiful wife and kids out for a meal (be it Wendy’s or the best steakhouse in town) I’ll feel complete. The goal will be achieved.
Not very exciting, is it? I like to say I’m the anti-author. I’m not planning my movie trilogies or bigger houses. I don’t have time for that kind of thing. I need to walk the path of reality, and reality says I’m a 38 year old man with responsibilities and a job to do every minute of the day. The day I provide for my family based solely on the profits of my brain musings, how glorious will that be!

12. What kind of research do you do, and how long do you spend researching before beginning a book?
None! The great thing about being a fantasy writer with a penchant for massive global extinction is that I get to start fresh with ‘facts’ all the time!
In truth, I’ll do a bit when dealing with realistic place like in ‘Death Dresses Poorly’, which takes place in the Seattle area (which I’m admittedly not terribly familiar with). I want to make sure I get place names correct, or travel times between locations. Mundane stuff like that.

13. How many hours a day/week do you write?
Four or five, usually. My lunch hours at work are the extent of most of my writing time, and sometimes I need to use those for things like this! Not that I’m complaining. I’m thankful for the chance, but it’s taken me two lunch hours to answers your questions.
Once I get home, it’s kids kids kids, and I’ve never been good at writing in silence after they go to bed. I’m not complaining. ‘Catching Hell’ was original 225k words, written over lunch hours for a year. Anything is possible with patience, especially if it’s a story you really want to tell.

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14. How do you select the names of your characters?
Unlike most authors I speak with, naming things, be it people, places, or things, is one of my favorite things to do! When I was asked to create a huge list of names and places for my work with Hardmode Games, I practically wet myself in joy!
Much of it I simply can’t answer. I find names I like, do an ounce of research to make sure I didn’t inadvertently recreate a famous Nazi death camp general or something, and go from there. Some I’ve known forever like Aryu, one of my protagonists in ‘Catching Hell’, and others I just threw in like Ethan from ‘Death Dresses Poorly’. Fun fact: Ethan originally had my oldest son’s name, but after some conversations with my wife, we agreed we perhaps didn’t want to stigmatize the kid with the same handle as this unenviable character I’d written, so I changed it. I can’t live without Ethan now.

15. What was your hardest scene to write?
Well I’ll avoid spoilers as much as possible, but the ending of ‘Catching Hell Pt. 2’ wins for sure. From the beginning I wanted to write a scene I’d envisioned for as long as I can remember. Something different. Something that discards the fiction clichés and tropes we’re all familiar with, while also making it believable and earned. When the conclusion is reached, the reader says “That’s realistic. That’s what should happen.” I like to think I did that, but only time will tell.

16. Why did you choose to write in your particular field or genre? If you write more than one, how do you balance them?
I’m a man awash in fantasy. From a young age I gravitated to fantasy stories and imaginative science fiction. I absolutely have a hyperactive imagination and these genres fill that brain-hole so perfectly.
When I entered into my formative writing years, anime and manga became a huge part of my life. The Japanese were telling stories with such heart and depth and unbridled creativity that I couldn’t help but get wrapped up in them. In the end, the answer to your question is a terribly simple one: I write what I know.

17. How long have you been writing?
Although I like to think I’ve always been creative in my writings, the commitment really took hold when I was 15 and 16 years old. I had this mental vision of a long, epic fantasy story and I just started writing it down with a pen and paper. It consumed me so much that I wrote a trilogy entirely by hand, which became the basis of my ‘Ryuujin’ world. I still have the dent in my finger from the pen to this day. When I pulled my head up from the binders, I’d almost flunked out of high school. After some hard work and creativity, along with the help of a teacher or two that I was lucky to have, I pulled through, but the fuse was lit.

18. What inspires you?
Life. Life is the greatest inspiration of all. I have a favorite saying that I unashamedly admit I came up with: I don’t like good books, I like good stories. The medium is not important. When I look at the struggles of my loved ones, or the triumphs of strangers on the other side of the world, I see so many stories that give me a reason to keep talking. They’re not all victories. There are enough tragedies to remind ourselves that there’s bad with the good, but that’s the cost of living. I see my kids do things that move me to tears with their bravery, so I better get to telling what stories I can in order to help show them the things I’ve seen and how I see them.

19. How do you find or make time to write?
I don’t. I just take the time when I get it. I don’t believe in forcing myself to write by setting daily goals. Challenges like NaNoWriMo are great for some, but for me it can go walk off a cliff. My best writing comes when I don’t pressure myself to actually write. I just need to accept that I may have to go for days or weeks without writing, and I’m ok with that.

20. What projects are you working on at the present?
Right now I’m helping market ‘Death Dresses Poorly ’alongside publisher Fluky Fiction, I’m getting ‘Catching Hell Pt. 1’ ready with its publisher Double Dragon Press for the March launch, and I’m doing a decent amount of writing work with the Hardmode team on their original IP, which is a secret but hopefully you’ll see the results of that work later this year.

21. What do your plans for future projects include?
Well the biggest one is ‘Catching Hell Pt. 2’, since just having the first part of a duology is no fun for anyone. It’s a finished work (I wrote it all at one time, but it was too big so I had to split it up) but it hasn’t been edited and prepped to my liking, so I want to get that done and hopefully find it a home before people forget my name.

22. Share a link to your author website.
I can be found at http://www.marcwatson.ca, on Twitter and Instagram at @writewatson, and on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/marcwroteabook

Bio:

Marc is the author of genre fiction (primarily Fantasy and Science Fiction of all lengths). He began writing at the age of 15 with a pen and paper, and never really stopped, even though until recently it was more of a background to him than my defining trait. He has been published on flash fiction site www.101words.org, as well as comedy site www.thecorrectness.com. Marc has been a student of the excellent writing classes at Athabasca University for a number of years.

He lives in Calgary, Alberta, and was spawned out of the depths of Southern Ontario. Marc is a husband, proud father of two, and can be sometimes found at an actual job. An avid outdoors-man, martial artist of some high repute, baseball player of very little repute, and lover of all Mexican foods. One day ‘World Famous Poutine Aficionado’ will be on his business cards.

You can also find Marc on Facebook at www.facebook.com/marcwroteabook, and on twitter at @writewatson. For public appearances and interviews, he is proudly represented by Creative Edge Publicity.

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Interview with Andi O’ Connor…


You will feel the excitement radiating from Andi O’Connor in this interview. She has her first novel launching in March 2013 – congratulations! A fantasy author her story is sure to intrigue her readers. To accompany Andi I thought today’s word was apt – Mirth – definition: gaiety accompanied by laughter. I’m sure it reflects how Andi is feeling.

Andi O Connor

  • Of the characters you have created or envisioned, which is your favorite & why?

Wow, tough question! I would have to say that my favorite character is Jae from my short story, The Mé’Draak’s Redemption, which you can read on my blog: abookaffair.wordpress.com. I was able to get inside his mind on a deeply raw and personal level. The situation he is in puts him in an extremely vulnerable state, both mentally and physically, yet there is still an air of tenacity about him. Despite the unjust actions against him and the deplorable situation he is in, he still has compassion for others and a willingness to put the lives of others before his own. I actually find him to be quite inspirational.

  • Do you favor one type of genre or do you dabble in more than one?

I definitely favor fantasy, specifically epic/high, but I do experiment with different subgenres. My short story, The Mé’Draak’s Redemption, is on the darker side of things. It was a new style for me, but it turned out well and actually ended up being one of my favorites. You never know how something will turn out unless you try!

  • What do you enjoy most about writing?

I am able to lose myself in the characters and worlds I create. There are times when I look up from my notebook while in the middle of writing a scene and find myself taken aback that I am not in the fictional world. Knowing that my readers may experience the same thing is truly an awesome feeling.

  • Have you got a favorite place to write?

In my office with the door closed, surrounded by books, and with a few candles lit.

  • Do you plan your stories, or are you a seat of the pants style writer?

I definitely write by the seat of my pants! I generally have a basic idea of what I want to have happen. And when I say basic, I mean basic! I give myself a starting point, and let the characters direct me where they want to go. There have been many times when my husband has asked how something will end or what comes next, and I have absolutely no idea! A frequent exchange between the two of us is when he says, “I can’t wait to see what happens!” And my reply is, “Me too!”

  • What inspires your stories?

I know this sounds cliché (please don’t hit me with a stick!) but EVERYTHING! I have always been content to sit back and quietly observe what is happening around me, soaking up everything like a sponge. I am continually amazed at how many things have inspired me and influenced my writing. People, places, world events, controversial issues, conversations, dreams, pets. The list is endless.

  • What are you currently reading?

Nightshade by Susan Wittig Albert

  • Do you have any odd habits or childhood stories?

I have a few habits, but I wouldn’t necessarily consider them odd. Annoying perhaps. But not odd. 😉

  • Do you have any pets?

Four dogs…Yikes!

  • Do you belong to a writing group? If so which one?

I belong to the online writing group, Fantasy Writers

  • What age did you start writing stories/poems?

I began my first novel while at college at the age of twenty as a fun side project, and it gradually developed from there. I have to say that when I began, I never imagined I would ever be published!

  • Do you have a book published? If so what is it called & where can readers purchase it?

My debut novel, The Lost Heir, is scheduled for release in March 2013!

  • If you could meet one favorite author who would it be and why?

If I could wave a magic wand and put myself in a room overflowing with good food, drinks, comfortable furniture, and the company of only one of my favorite authors, I would have to choose Mark Twain. I have been a huge fan of his writing for many years and love his witticisms and sense of humor and how he translated both in his writing. I wouldn’t bombard him with questions of his career, writing style, or life. Instead, I would simply want to have a relaxed evening filled with friendly conversation and banter. I have visions of myself crying and snorting from laughter. It will obviously never happen. But a girl can dream.

  • If you could live anywhere in the world – where would it be?

Ireland. I have been there twice and both times found myself experiencing severe withdrawal symptoms and planning my next trip while in the plane on the way home.

  • What’s your  favorite movie of all time?
The Lord of the Rings film trilogy
The Lord of the Rings film trilogy (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Lord of the Rings Trilogy. But if you are going to force me to pick just one, I would have to say Return of the King.

  • Where can readers find you and your blog?

Check out my blog at abookaffair.wordpress.com or follow me on Facebook at facebook.com/oconnor.andi

  • Do you have plans or ideas for your next book?

I am currently working on another fantasy novel titled Silevethiel and have begun work on the sequel to The Lost Heir. Once both of those are completed, I plan to expand my short story, The Mé’Draak’s Redemption into a novel.

  • Who is your best supporter/mentor/encourager?

My husband, who without which, I most certainly would have given up long ago. I truly would not have made it this far without his infinite supply of support, encouragement, and love.

My thanks to Andi and I wish her all the best for her debut novel.