Mandy Eve-Barnett's Blog for Readers & Writers

My Book News & Advocate for the Writing Community ©

Bibliophile’s Collective Tuesday – Book Review & Book Titles

November 16, 2020
mandyevebarnett


In my research for my new detective series, I read a novel by M.J. Arlidge entitled Eeny Meeny. The premises of the narrative becomes all too clear and links to the title all too well as you read. You can find my review on my Goodreads page but just in case, here it is: Absolutely riveting! I didn’t see the culprit coming. Well written and structured. A fast paced, who done it. A real page turner.

I will endeavor to ensure my own narrative has the same tension and surprise culprit. M.J. Arlidge uses the same detective for his novels, using various scenarios for each narrative. My detective series has a different structure, covering three detectives and three different cities but the same antagonist.

I have been asked to explain the reason I chose the title of my series as The Delphic Murders. I wanted a word that meant obscure, as my antagonist is just that. So I delved into my knowledge of Greek literature and found Delphic. It means deliberately obscure or ambiguous.

What books have you recently read? What was your review on them?

Winter Arrived

As you can see winter arrived here in Alberta. So I have decamped from my writing desk into the living room, where there is a huge window. This gives me welcome daylight but also a cozy writing space beside the fireplace.

The first book in my series, The Delphic Murders is well under way, with over 36,000 words. As with any first draft, I am just writing where the characters take me. Early next year, I will begin revisions and editing and making notes for book two.

I am so pleased my steampunk novel has proven so popular, with online and in person purchases. Thank you all for continuing you enjoy the stories I create. All my books are here: https://amazon.com/-/e/B01MDUAS0V

Please leave a review it would mean the world to me.

Wordsmiths Collective Thursday – Change in Writing Technique

October 8, 2020
mandyevebarnett


When I was struggling to find a concept for NaNoWriMo this year, out of the blue an idea came to mind. Now this, in itself, is not unusual because we all know it happens. However, it was not only the genre that surprised me but the fact the idea formulated as a three book series!

The genre is a detective/crime, something I have not tackled before. Although, I have written in various genres, it is normal for the story to come first and then the genre becomes apparent as I write. This is the complete opposite and makes it an exciting prospect. The idea formulated around three main characters and a common adversary across three books.

The other surprise was that I easily began planning each book – another first for me the self proclaimed free flow writer. I am not sure why this change in technique came about but it will certainly play a big part in this new project.

Whether we plan in detail or go with the flow, there is no right or wrong way to write – we all do it differently, which results in the uniqueness of our narratives.

Has your writing technique changed over time?

Do you plan or free flow your stories?

Photo by Julia M Cameron on Pexels.com

Bibliophile’s Collective Tuesday – Women’s Fiction Day

June 9, 2020
mandyevebarnett


fiction

Yesterday was Women’s Fiction Day. As a woman who reads a wide variety of genres, I hope this ‘day’ is inclusive to all genres not just ‘romance’. It is quite a generalization and one that should be regarded with a pinch of salt.

Of course, we all love to read an idealized narrative with a happy ending but we are more than that. Women have interests that cover a broad spectrum of story lines and types. Gone are the days when the genteel sex was restricted to poetry and light reading. (Thank goodness).

We read thrillers, sci-fi, detective novels and mysteries to name a few. Our reading habits have changed as well as our interests and the scope of our capabilities.

So celebrate our diversity in the written word – no matter the genre.

As you know, I also write in a wide range of genres – so not only do I read what I preach but also write it! https://www.amazon.com/-/e/B01MDUAS0V

What book(s) have you read that expanded your chosen genres to read?

genres

 

 

Genres of Literature – Crime Fiction

May 14, 2018
mandyevebarnett


CFF Logo black no strapline

Crime fiction fictionalizes a multiple of crimes from murder to kidnapping to extortion. The narratives relay how the criminal gets caught, and the repercussions of the crime as well as their detection, the criminals, and their motives. It is usually distinguished from mainstream fiction such as historical fiction or science fiction, however, the boundaries are indistinct. Crime fiction has multiple sub-genres which include detective fiction or whodunits. courtroom dramas, hard-boiled fiction and legal thrillers.  Most crime fiction deals with the crime’s investigation rather than the court room. Suspense and mystery are key elements nearly ubiquitous to the genre. 

Crime Fiction was recognized as a distinct literary genre in the 19th century with specialists writers and a devoted readership. Earlier novels typically did not have the modern systematic attempts at detection: with no detective or indeed police trying to solve the case but rather more mystery in context. Such as a ghost story, a horror story, or a revenge story. The ‘locked room; mystery was a precursor to the detective stories. The most famous of course is Arthur Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes, whose mental deductions and astute observations led him to the culprits. Two other notable authors in this ‘new’ genre were Agatha Christie and Dorothy L Sayers.  

 

  • Detective fiction
  • Cozy Mystery
  • Whodunit
  • Historical whodunit
  • Locked room whodunit
  • Locked room mystery
  • Police procedural
  • Forensic
  • Legal thriller
  • Spy novel
  • Caper story
  • Psychological thriller
  • Parody or spoof

Each one commonly has a lot of suspense, hidden clues, a charismatic detective and an elusive criminal. The genre continues to develop with character analysis, covering specific themes, LGBT crimes and police investigation themes.

Have you written crime fiction? 

Which sub-genre do you write?

Why not share a link?

 

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