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Lost Words of Medical Terminology (Part Three)…

March 21, 2016
mandyevebarnett


k5888280

There are some rather strange medical conditions in this list!

pilimiction n 1847 -1874
passing of hair-like bodies in the urine
His doctor was particularly concerned about his pilimiction, for obvious reasons.

siagonology n 1895 -1895
study of jaw-bones
Reliance on siagonology alone led to the proliferation of the Piltdown Man hoax.

sireniform adj 1849 -1852
having the lower legs abnormally joined into a single limb
When they learned that their child had a sireniform deformity, they were devastated.

tussicate v 1598 -1890
to cough
He tussicated throughout the opera, annoying nearby audience members.

visotactile adj 1652 -1652
involving both touch and vision
The deaf man learned to make better use of visotactile input in his daily life.

My sentence: As his patient tussicated, the doctor siagonogy for irregular movement. Continuing with visotactile examination he was concerned at his patients admission of pilimiction. To ease his patients worry, the doctor related his investigations into sireniform.

Did you write a sentence with the words?

Doctor_Patient

For more lost words take a look at – http://phrontistery.info/clw4.html

Lost Words of Medical Terminology (Part Two)…

March 14, 2016
mandyevebarnett


bed

ectylotic adj 1736 -1864
removing warts or calluses
Use this ectylotic bandage on your finger and you’ll be cured in a week or two.

jecorary adj 1684 -1684
of or relating to the liver
The alcoholic’s refusal to seek treatment caused him no end of jecorary trouble.

mochlic n 1657 -1753
drastic purgative medicine
This mochlic remedy is worse than the disease, but at least it will be over quickly.

occaecation n 1608 -1691
the act of blinding
After his occaecation, he was unable to enjoy simple pleasures such as reading.

panchymagogue n 1657 -1893
medicine purging all the humours from the body
What you need is a good panchymagogue to get you back on your feet!

My sentence:  The patient had endured the ectylotic treatment without complaint but after the necessary occarcation became depressed. His continued illness required his physicians to prescribe jecorary and panchymagogie at which the patient declined and discharged himself.

How did you use these words?

nu303003

Source of lost words:  http://phrontistery.info/clw4.html

 

 

 

A Superb Complicated Character…

November 24, 2013
mandyevebarnett


Maunder – definition: 1. to talk in a rambling, foolish, or meaningless way; 2. to move, go, or act in an aimless, confused manner

As a long time viewer of Dr. Who, I could not miss the 50 year celebrations of this fantastic time traveler show this weekend. I don’t mind admitting that I have watched every single Doctor from Hartnell to Smith. For any show to last such a long time, is in a large par,t because of the excellent writing. To have a character time traveling is one thing but this one can morph into new forms, ensuring the viewer is continually engaged with their personalities. Each reincarnation has his own character traits and some were more rambling in their diction than others. The story lines and monsters are obviously a major part of the show as well and the writers have managed to keep us guessing what they will create next.

Dr Who

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doctor_(Doctor_Who)

Everyone has their favorite Doctor or Doctors. Some are memories of episodes when they were children and others when as adults they can appreciate the complexity of the time traveling hero and his Tardis.

As a writer, I only think it fair to highlight the writers who have made us scream, hide behind the sofa and puzzle over the complexities of each episode. The attention to detail and back story makes each episode so ‘real’ that we are aware of the monster’s motivation and await the Doctor’s solution with avid anticipation.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Doctor_Who_writers

I salute these writers for their ingenuity and excellent writing. This quote says it all:

Douglas Adams, who was a Doctor Who writer of huge renown, said the show had to be complicated enough for children and simple enough for adults, and that still holds true, I think. The target audience is everybody from 6 to 106,” he continued. “You want it to be exciting and thrilling and have a lot of different takes to it. You want it to be emotional, and have great characters, and you also want it to be self-contained: within 45 minutes, you’re having to land on a planet, or a period of history, meet a whole bunch of people, solve a mystery, have an adventure and get back in the TARDIS — and with jokes, and you can’t afford to do any of it. That’s why it’s one of the hardest shows to write for, but when you even come close to getting it right, it’s the most exciting show in the world to write for.”

Source: http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/heat-vision/writers-explain-why-doctor-who-659103

Dalek

 

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