Tag Archives: fantasy

Author Interview – Sandra Hurst


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Sandra Hurst

  1. Does writing energize or exhaust you?

That definitely depends on what I’m writing. Some scenes flow so easily onto the paper with very little effort. My imagination sees the pictures, hears the voices, and obeys. Other times it can be emotionally harrowing. It can take me days to get over the death of a beloved character, even though I made the decision to kill her off.

  1. What is your writing Kryptonite?

Handling my own nature is the hard part for me. I tend to be very distractible and moderately obsessive. There is always that one more piece of research, a new book to read, and, Oh Look! I got a facebook mention. My mind will bounce to anything new and shiny and sometimes when it lands on a topic I find it hard to let go and get back to the writing. There is a definite benefit to this type of mind though, once I start writing and the scenes are flying, I will keep going until someone pulls me out.

  1. Did you ever consider writing under a pseudonym?

I actually do write under a synonym. I work in the legal profession and was advised that it might be better not to use my real name for security purposes.

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  1. What other authors are you friends with, and how do they help you become a better writer?

I have been so lucky! Two of the first people I met when I started to write were Rebekah Raymond and J.J. Reichenbach, they, along with several others convinced me that my ‘baboon crap’ was worth the effort and helped me get started learning the craft of writing.

  1. Do you want each book to stand alone, or are you trying to build a body of work with connections between each book?

My original plan was three standalone books in the same world. But the story doesn’t seem to be working out that way.  It looks like being a three-book series.

  1. What was the best money you ever spent as a writer?

In the beginning I’d say joining the Alexandra Writers Centre Society, a local writers group that runs classes on everything from writing technique, to plotting, to poetry. Once my book was underway, I hired a good editor whose knowledge of her craft and determination to present my work at its best is the reason Y’keta is a polished, professional read.

  1. What was an early experience where you learned that language had power?

When I was little, we had a burgundy set of children’s encyclopaedia’s and I would put on performances in the living room and insist that my family listen to the stories and legends that I read. I grew up on the stories of Robin Hood, King Arthur, and the Fae. What else could I ever be?

I love the authors who can make words dance and sentences MEAN things. This has led me to authors like Guy Gavriel Kay, and Don Dellilo. I would give my left ovary (not so dramatic a thing since at 55 those parts are hardly crucial) to sit down with either of these gentlemen, or even better their writing notes, for an afternoon!

  1. What’s your favorite under-appreciated novel?

That’s a hard question, there are so many good novels that go just under the popular radar. For me M.K. Wren’s Sword of the Lamb is a definite favourite. How will a government that has spanned centuries react when faced with political and social unrest? How does this affect the people born to a world that has never changed? If you enjoyed Asimov’s foundation series, you will probably like this one.

  1. As a writer, what would you choose as your mascot/avatar/spirit animal?

Oh fun! I think I would take a raven as my spirit animal. They are known for being wise birds but also for having a sense of fun and mischief.

  1. How many unpublished and half-finished books do you have?

Eeep. Do I have to admit it? At least eight, there is just not enough time!

  1. What does literary success look like to you?

For me its all about the reader’s reaction. Yes, the sales are great (PLEASE – buy the books), but if one person says to me that my words opened their eyes to a bigger world, or that I showed them the power of words and the beauty that they can bring, then I’m a success.

  1. What kind of research do you do, and how long do you spend researching before beginning a book?

I originally didn’t think that I was researching to write a book when I started out to write Y’keta. About five years ago, my husband found out that he was part Cree. At that time, I went back to the indigenous legends I’d learned growing up in Northern Alberta as a way to teach my son the history and culture that my husband never learned.  For more than four years I studied the language and history of several different indigenous cultures.

  1. How many hours a day/week do you write?

When the words are flowing I write two to three hours a day. When things aren’t so easy and I’m struggling with a scene or a plot point it’s harder, but I try to keep to writing something every day. Whether poetry, or as part of my ongoing books.

  1. How do you select the names of your characters?

I try to find names that will work within the cultures of the story taking into consideration the ‘hardness’ or ‘softness’ of certain sounds and whether they match the character. In Y’keta, I borrowed the name of a traveller that my friend met in Ontario (Y’keta) and adjusted the name of my cousin, Sian.

  1. What was your hardest scene to write?

In my work-in-progress, D’vhan, there is a scene where a young child dies. Writing it was emotionally crippling and took me to some very dark areas of my past. It was a necessary part of the story, but very very hard.

  1. Why did you choose to write in your particular field or genre?  If you write more than one, how do you balance them?

I write fantasy because the words are my way of exploring a world I can’t see. I’m a mythmaker, there is nothing that gives me more creative juice than asking a question and then building a world to find the answer. Myths and fantasy give us the opportunity to look at ourselves in new and often unusual ways, to play a huge game of ‘what if’ and see where the answers will fall. I find the basic understanding is the same when I’m working on romance books, except that you are now playing what if with relationships and feelings.

  1. How long have you been writing?

According to my mum I have always written stories and poems. I wrote my first ‘official’ poem in Grade four and had my first work published in a school magazine in 1977.

  1. What inspires you?  

There are so many people that inspire me, whether they are historical figures or literary ones. I think the common thread in all of them is that they had the opportunity to quit, every reason to say I’m too old, too tired, it’s just easier to let it be someone else’s problem. This kind of hero, unwilling, often flawed, yet willing to step up, gets me every time.

  1. How do you find or make time to write?

Finding time to write is an ongoing issue for me. I have started to take myself on writing dates, the people at the local Starbucks know my name and how I want my coffee, they don’t ask anymore.  I also have a great group of writer friends that hold sleepovers now and then. Much laughter, much wine, and many words have come from these weekends.

  1. What projects are you working on at the present?

I’ve got three projects on the go at the moment, with a never empty folder of ideas on the backburner.

The next book in the Sky Road Trilogy, D’vhan, is in the ‘necklace’ stage of drafting. I’ve got several pearls but I’m missing the chain of story movement that will tie them together.

I am working on a romance that will be part of an upcoming series of novellas with my contribution, Peace Out, slated for May 2018.

There is also a chapbook of poetry in the works, although at the moment the prose has centre stage.

Romance novella, Peace Out releases on May 4th.  Video.  

Peace Out video link. 

  1. What do your plans for future projects include?

I am plotting a YA Fantasy based on a world where the center of the earth is molten magic and drilling is creating imbalance and magic quakes – Geomages! I’ve also got poetry,plans for a darker themed adult fantasy about a dying world that even the gods have abandoned, two other romance novels and a space opera. So much to do! It’s going to be fun.

  1. Share a link to your author website.

Website:       http://www.delusionsof literacy.com

Twitter           _SandraHurst
Facebook:    SandraHurst.Author

Author Interview Konn Lavery


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konn-lavery

  1. Does writing energize or exhaust you?

Depending on the phase that the book is in and what other projects I have going on. Usually writing energizes me, it is often fuel for the soul. The times that it doesn’t are when it is in the heavy editing phase, that uses a very different, critical-thinking part of the brain which can be exhausting.

  1. What is your writing Kryptonite?

Time:)

  1. Did you ever consider writing under a pseudonym?

I initially did  in the past, thinking that it might be good to not share what I do in case it was too graphic for people in my work life. However, I think the benefits of being transparent outweigh risks.

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  1. What other authors are you friends with, and how do they help you become a better writer?

I’m friends with many authors and keep tabs with as many as I can. Most of them are in the local area of Alberta, some are elsewhere, and I have only met them online. Some of the local ones I keep touch with are Matthew Gillies, M M Dos Santos, Adam Dreece and Suzy Vadori. We frequently run into each other at conventions.

  1. Do you want each book to stand alone, or are you trying to build a body of work with connections between each book?

The grand plan is to build a connection for each and every story that I write. Some of the books read as stand alone and others are part of a series. For the diehard fans, they’ll notice small hints that connect the stories together. This opens up many questions to the reader since there are large time period differences in the novels.

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  1. What was the best money you ever spent as a writer?

I’d say getting an editor, it makes a world of difference. A second one was paying for consultation advice from a successful indie author who was able to provide insights into the indie author world.What was an early experience where you learned that language had power?

Most likely when I was reading the Redwall series by Brian Jacques. His work painted detailed imagery in my head and I realized the power of how words could transcend one’s mind into new worlds.

  1. What’s your favorite under-appreciated novel?

That’s a tough one, I think there are a lot of them in the indie author world. If I had to pick a personal choice, it’d have to be a non-fiction book. Specifically  Looking In, Seeing Out: Consciousness by Menas Kafatos and Thalia Kafatou. It is a powerful book and offers great insight into science and spirituality.

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  1. As a writer, what would you choose as your mascot/avatar/spirit animal?

Well, my Chinese Zodiac birth sign is a horse. I think that animal best summarizes my creative process – a work horse.

  1. How many unpublished and half-finished books do you have?

I have a lot of book outlines and short stores on the go. Currently no finished manuscripts.

  1. What does literary success look like to you?

To me literary success is being able to make a stable income from your work.

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  1. What kind of research do you do, and how long do you spend researching before beginning a book?

I spend a lot of time researching, before plotting, during writing and during editing. Questions arise that never crossed my mind until I am at that moment in writing the book.

  1. How many hours a day/week do you write?

It is pretty spontaneous. Some months I write every day around 2,000 words and other months I will barely write a total of 5,000. Of course with the blog I do write fairly consistently on a weekly basis.

  1. How do you select the names of your characters?

The process varies based on the genre I am writing. Fantasy names are often combinations of a couple words or have some sort of historical background to them. Other names are based on age, ethnicity and time period. Basically something that will make them believable to be in their world.

  1. What was your hardest scene to write?

I’d say the battle scene in my upcoming fantasy novel, Mental Damnation III. It contains a pretty lengthy fight between some powerful characters. It had to elaborate on what magic they had while remaining fast paced.

  1. Why did you choose to write in your particular field or genre?  If you write more than one, how do you balance them?

Genre often becomes a second thought for me. I have an idea book filled with concepts for stories. Once I find one that I have a hunch on where it can go I start jumping into the plot outlines and then the genre becomes clearer. Usually my work fits within the horror or fantasy realms.

  1. How long have you been writing?

I’ve been writing all my life, professionally I haven’t really started until 2012 with the first release of Mental Damnation Reality.

  1. What inspires you?

Movies inspire me, books, video games and my own life. It’s like being a sponge and absorbing as much around you as you possibly can.

  1. How do you find or make time to write?

I don’t know! Ultimately though you just have to make time for it. You either have to cancel on some previous plans or power through being tired or push through a creative block.

  1. What projects are you working on at the present?

Currently I have a slasher in the works. I have notes for a number of short stories and the fourth Mental Damnation installment. Not 100% sure what order these will come out in though.

  1. What do your plans for future projects include?

For immediate release, YEGman is coming out along with Mental Damnation III later this year.

  1. Share a link to your author website.

http://www.konnlavery.com

Bio:

Konn Lavery is a Canadian horror and dark fantasy writer who is known for his Mental Damnation series. The second book, Dream, reached the Edmonton Journal’s top five selling fictional books list. He started writing fantasy stories at a very young age while being home schooled. It wasn’t until graduating college that he began professionally pursuing his work with his first release, Reality. Since then he has continued to write works of fiction ranging from fantasy to horror.

His literary work is done in the long hours of the night. By day, Konn runs his own graphic design and website development business under the title Reveal Design (www.revealdesign.ca). These skills have been transcribed into the formatting and artwork found within his publications supporting his fascination of transmedia storytelling.

Links:

http://konnlavery.com

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Facebook

Instagram

Goodreads

Amazon

YEGman

 

Author Interview – Richard Paolinelli


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  1. Does writing energize or exhaust you?

Both at times, as strange as that may sound. When the words are flowing I seem to gain energy as I go along. But there are times, usually when I am pushing to make a hard deadline, when I feel like I’m dragging about five tons of brick around on my shoulders and it is difficult to write the next sentence.

  1. What is your writing Kryptonite?

The Internet. It is just too easy to hop on to check my email “really quick” and get distracted by something and three hours later suddenly remember I was supposed to be writing. The house hound also tries his best to distract, usually when I am really on a roll.

  1. Did you ever consider writing under a pseudonym?

Briefly. But I was writing for newspapers for so long that it just seemed natural to continue to do so when I transitioned to fiction writing. Plus, I really dislike posting in online forums under fake screen names as I feel that leads to bad behavior by folks who feel they can get away with anything without any accountability. So I have always made it a point to put my real name behind everything I write, online or off.

  1. What other authors are you friends with, and how do they help you become a better writer?

I know so many of them that if I tried to list them all here we’d break the internet. Not to mention I’d probably forget some of them and then have to spend the rest of the year apologizing. But in their own ways they have all helped me become a better writer. Sometimes it is from just reading their work and seeing how they develop a character or lay out a scene. Sometimes it comes from the way they market their books or deal with unfair criticism.

 

 

  1. Do you want each book to stand alone, or are you trying to build a body of work with connections between each book?

Almost all of them are stand alone, although I have readers asking me when the sequel to Escaping Infinity is coming out. I do have one trilogy though, the Jack Del Rio political thriller series. Writing in so many different genres as I do I very much doubt there a way for me ever to be able to connect them. All I really hope for is that they are all enjoyable stories that readers continue to want to read.

  1. What was the best money you ever spent as a writer?

The $20 that I spent on three Himekami CDs many years ago (pre-MP3 era). Listening to the beautifully enchanting synthesized music produced by this group from Japan seems to put me into the perfect state of mind to write.

  1. What was an early experience where you learned that language had power?

When I sat down one day at the age of 4 and heard a man say that he hoped for a world where his children would be judged by the content of their character and not by the color of their skin. It took a few more years for me to fully understand the concept, but those words made perfect sense to 4-year-old me. It wasn’t what a person looked like that mattered, it is what they said and did that was all that counted. I’ve always strived to keep that lesson in my heart in the half-century that has passed since I first heard them and am reminded of that day every time I read those words again.

 

 

  1. What’s your favorite under-appreciated novel?

Time Traveller’s Never Die by Jack McDevitt. I loved the way Jack (I get to call him that because we’ve worked together on a Sherlock Holmes anthology and corresponded a few times since) dealt with the paradox of time travelling and it was this book, and discovering Jack’s path to becoming a writer at a later age, that inspired me to try to give fiction writing another try at the age of 46. 

  1. As a writer, what would you choose as your mascot/avatar/spirit animal?

Polar Bear. Because they are patiently relentless in their pursuit of their goal. For them it is their next meal but for me it is getting the current novel finished so I can begin working on the next one.

  1. How many unpublished and half-finished books do you have?

About 30 in various states of started but not finished to just outline-only.

  1. What does literary success look like to you?

When I have finished a book and it is available to be purchased on Amazon or in a bookstore. That means another story of mine – another world or universe of my creation – is available to be read and, hopefully, enjoyed.

 

 

  1. What kind of research do you do, and how long do you spend researching before beginning a book?

With my two non-fiction books I spent years going through newspaper microfilms, online searching and interviews before I sat down and started writing them. It probably worked out to two years each from starting research to writing completed and the book released.

With my fiction works I’d say I research for about a week before I start writing. Even then I find I will pause writing at points to do additional research when something does not sound right or if I make a change in the original outline along the way.

  1. How many hours a day/week do you write?

At least 30 hours a week and sometimes as many as 60 depending on other things going on in my life.

  1. How do you select the names of your characters?

I have a couple of ways. Usually the names seem to come to me and I go with them if they “feel” right. But I discovered a website that generates first and last names based on several factors of race, ethnicity, gender and genre. I’ll scroll through a few randomly generated names until I find a combination I like.

  1. What was your hardest scene to write?

In Reservations which was the first Jack Del Rio novel. I had decided to kill off one of the major characters and when I got to the chapter when the death was to occur I found it harder to write with each passing word. I kept going back and forth on whether or not to kill the character or not. It took me 14 hours to write that chapter and I recall finishing it, saving it and then walking away from my desk in tears when I finished writing the death scene that ended the chapter. It felt like I had murdered a loved one. But the response I have received from readers has convinced me that I made the correct decision.

 

 

  1. Why did you choose to write in your particular field or genre?  If you write more than one, how do you balance them?

My early books were sports non-fiction, which were easy to do coming off 20 years as a sportswriter, and then my initial fiction works were political mystery-thrillers. But my first love as a young reader was science fiction and that is the genre I will be doing most of my writing in for the foreseeable future.

  1. How long have you been writing?

Since 1983 when I started as a freelance writer. Aside from being the lead writer for two issues of a comic book series in 1986, I started as a full-time novelist in 2011 after I retired as a newspaper writer/editor in 2010.

  1. What inspires you? 

 My family. I want to leave a legacy in my writings that my children and grandchildren and their grandchildren can be proud of long after I am gone.

  1. How do you find or make time to write?

I am fortunate in that this is my full-time job so I have a nice routine that allows me to write on a regular schedule. Having worked for 20 years in newspapers where I was expected to write 2-3,000 words a day has made it something of a habit now, one that seems as natural to me as breathing.

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  1. What projects are you working on at the present?

Many. I am helping finish the final book written by my friend Gibson Michaels, who passed away last year before he could finish it. It would have been his fourth book and we want to make sure his readers get to read it. I am co-writing a western novel with Jim Christina, with whom I co-host an online show about writers and the craft of writing – The Writer’s Block on LA Talk Radio. I’m editing one of the 11 books in the Planetary Anthology series (and have stories in several of the others) and I am helping start up a new organization for professional creators in science fiction and fantasy, the Science Fiction & Fantasy Creators Guild ( www.sffcguild.com)  .

  1. What do your plans for future projects include?

I have three science-fiction/fantasy projects lined up I want to finish by the end of 2018 – When the Gods Fell, Cursed Firstborn and Seadragon.

  1. Share a link to your author website.

https://scifiscribe.com/

 

Author Interview – A.L. Butcher


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Please be aware some of Alex’s novels are 18+ rated.

  1. Does writing energize or exhaust you?

Both! I have fibromyalgia so some days I don’t have the energy to do much of any use. I try and write everyday (and don’t always succeed), but some days, if I feel OK I get a total buzz from the writing. It’s satisfying to create something, and the feel-good is worth a lot. On the other hand the non-writing days make me feel a bit rubbish. It does depend on what else I have done that day. I work full time, so writing is usually limited to the evenings, weekends and holidays. I enjoy it though. When it becomes a burden I will stop.

  1. What is your writing Kryptonite?

Gaming and the internet. I am easily distracted. I’ll just go online for half an hour before I write… just 30 minutes…. Who am I kidding?

  1. Did you ever consider writing under a pseudonym?

I have and I do. I have an erotic romance written under the name Alexa Lynsey (which incidentally just won an award from Princess of the Light blog for best Erotic Romance in 2017).  The downside is the promotional aspect. It takes ages to build a following and to start over is hard. That said it has benefits as well – especially for the ‘adult’ genres.

  1. What other authors are you friends with, and how do they help you become a better writer?

Tori Zigler, Barbara Tarn, Joe Bonadonna, Janet Morris, Nickie Storey-Bailey, Diana L Wicker and several others. The indie author scene tends to be supportive. We share networking ideas, we offer advice on books, and promotion. We grumble to each other, and enjoy one anothers successes.

  1. Do you want each book to stand alone, or are you trying to build a body of work with connections between each book?

The Light Beyond the Storm Chronicles series is just that – a series – but each book can be read alone to a degree. It helps to know the world and the past events but the books are still enjoyable as stand alones. The Tales of Erana series are set in the same world but stand alone – there are two novellas and a short story collection. These are the myths and legends, the old tales and the ‘side’ tales.

The Light Beyond the Storm Chronicles Banner

The Kitchen Imps – short stories in one collection so that can be read alone.

The two Legacy of the Mask novellas share a link but can be read alone and in any order.

The Watcher- A Jack the Ripper Story is a standalone.

Outside the Walls is a standalone

  1. What was the best money you ever spent as a writer?

Editing! Various courses to hone the craft.

  1. What was an early experience where you learned that language had power?

That’s hard! I think it was probably the first time I can remember going to the theatre. It was a production of Voyage of the Dawn Treader by CS Lewis. I was spellbound. That inspired a love of theatre, fantasy and storytelling. The tale and its production were amazing and I came out feeling elated. Narnia was a whole new world, in the back of a wardrobe, with the great aspects of appealing characters, a brilliant story and worldbuilding.

  1. What’s your favorite under-appreciated novel?

I’d say either I, the Sun or The Reader of Acheron.

9. As a writer, what would you choose as your mascot/avatar/spirit animal?

A monkey, or a squirrel. I love both animals. Both are crafty, intelligent, and twist themselves in circles.

10. How many unpublished and half-finished books do you have?

Lots! Currently six or seven works in progress and a few other things that may one day be adapted into stories.

11. What does literary success look like to you?

Readers telling me they like the books, asking when the next book is, and making people happy with the stories.

12. What kind of research do you do, and how long do you spend researching before beginning a book?

That depends. I have researched such things as whether a salamander is edible (it is but you probably wouldn’t want to eat it); swamp terrain; poisons; field surgery; the airspeed velocity of a dragon, and what could make it fly. It really depends on what is needed for the work in questions. I do think research is important. Readers aren’t stupid – they will notice if something doesn’t work or is awry. There’s nothing like a screaming great plot or research hole to drop a reader right out of a book. That said it can’t be assumed that readers have the same knowledge of the world (especially a made up world) the author does.

13. How many hours a day/week do you write?

Well… I would like to say I write every single day but it’s not true. I work full time and I have a few health issues which means some days I can’t think straight, let alone string a coherent sentence together. I write several times a week, be it story, review, blog post, interview or poetry. My New Year’s resolution is to write for at least an hour a day – after all I can always delete it.

14. How do you select the names of your characters?

Baby names book, names I like the sound of or fit the characters and misspelled human names.

15. What was your hardest scene to write?

Pretty much any battle scene! Although there were some scenes in book III where a character dies and I blubbed a bit. Oddly sex scenes are much easier. I guess as usually battles contain more people doing complicated things…

16. Why did you choose to write in your particular field or genre?  If you write more than one, how do you balance them?

Mostly I write fantasy, both short stories and novels, but I also write poetry and in fact have done for far longer than I’ve been writing fiction. I also dabble with horror, and erotica (although not usually at the same time!) I write what appeals to me at any given time, what I am in the mood to write. Obviously a novel takes longer than a short story, and there are different audiences, and different skills involved with both. Each have their merits.

17. How long have you been writing?

I assume you mean how long have I been writing to publish? Book I was published in 2012. If you’re asking how long have I been writing stories ans poems I was probably about 7 when I started….

18. What inspires you?  

Everything.

19. How do you find or make time to write?

Hiding from the internet😉. I don’t go out much, I don’t have kids and so I have free time. In between gaming, reading, spending time with my partner and my doggy, and gardening, writing is what I do.

20. What projects are you working on at the present?

Book IV, a couple of short stories, a novella, a fantasy recipe book and a few other bits and pieces.

21. What do your plans for future projects include?

Possibly a roleplay game based on the world of Erana, a fantasy recipe book, at least two more novels, a Roman fantasy book and more anthologies.

Author Bio:

British-born Alexandra Butcher (a/k/a  A. L. Butcher) is an avid reader and creator of worlds, a poet, and a dreamer, a lover of science, natural history, history, and monkeys. Her prose has been described as ‘dark and gritty’ and her poetry as evocative.  She writes with a sure and sometimes erotic sensibility of things that might have been, never were, but could be.

Alex is the author of the Light Beyond the Storm Chronicles and the Tales of Erana lyrical fantasy series. She also has several short stories in the fantasy, fantasy romance genres with occasional forays into gothic style horror. With a background in politics, classical studies, ancient history and myth, her affinities bring an eclectic and unique flavor in her work, mixing reality and dream in alchemical proportions that bring her characters and worlds to life.

Outside the Walls by Diana L Wicker

Her short novella Outside the Walls, co-written with Diana :L Wicker received a Chill With a Book Reader’s Award in 2017.

Social Media links

Amazon Author page http://amzn.to/2hK33OM

Facebook Author Page http://bit.ly/FB2j0bbdZ

Twitter http://bit.ly/Twi2hJZ3h9

Goodreads http://bit.ly/GR2iqokvK

Library of Erana Blog http://bit.ly/Blog2iAWL3o

Linked In https://www.linkedin.com/in/alex-butcher-8342ab13b/

Tumblr https://libraryoferana.tumblr.com

Pinterest https://www.pinterest.co.uk/abmonkey/

Books

The Light Beyond the Storm Chronicles series – an adult fantasy/fantasy romance series, with a touch of erotica.

The Light Beyond the Storm Chronicles – Book I

In a dark world where magic is illegal and elves are enslaved a young elven sorceress runs for her life from the house of her evil Keeper. Pursued by his men and the corrupt Order of Witch-Hunters she must find sanctuary. As the slavers roll across the lands stealing elves from what remains of their ancestral home the Witch-Hunters turn a blind eye to the tragedy and a story of power, love and a terrible revenge unfolds.

(18 rated.)

Audio editions narrated by Rob Goll

Amazon.com http://amzn.to/2bPpspP

Amazon.com audio http://amzn.to/2iBgmQV

Amazon UK http://amzn.to/2i2KJfE

Amazon UK audio http://amzn.to/2iXfIdc

Barnes and Noble http://bit.ly/2iB9PWl

I-books http://apple.co/2j0pYW2

Audible UK http://adbl.co/2bGqZvO

Audible http://adbl.co/2hHT8El

Bundle Rabbit https://bundlerabbit.com/members/ebook/overview/XDOAydON

The Shining Citadel – The Light Beyond the Storm Chronicles – Book II

Who rules in this game of intrigue where magic is forbidden and elves enslaved? Journey where beliefs shatter like glass, truth is unwelcome and monsters from ancient times abound: share the romance and revenge, magic and passion, and the wages of greed in a world of darkest fantasy.

(18 rated)

Now in audio narrated by Shakespearean actor Rob Goll.

Amazon.com http://amzn.to/2c5LghC

Amazon UK http://amzn.to/2iqOXkr

Barnes and Noble http://bit.ly/2hHRv9K

I-books http://apple.co/2j0B4u8

Amazon UK http://amzn.to/2iOOWoB

Audible UK http://adbl.co/2iSW5GF

Amazon.com http://amzn.to/2j1DSnF

Audible.com http://adbl.co/2i3tf5t

https://bundlerabbit.com/members/ebook/overview/1wz3Jw2N

The Stolen Tower – the Light Beyond the Storm Chronicles – Book III

What stalks the land cannot be, but is.

Where magic is outlawed a troll Shaman calls from her deathbed to her heiress, Mirandra Var, daughter of the storm. Mirandra vows to find her missing kin, sort friend from for, and claim the dangerous secrets guarded by unthinkable creatures. If she succeeds she will become the leader of her tribe. If she fails there will be no tribe to lead.

Amazon.com http://amzn.to/2ivJjeL

Amazon UK http://amzn.to/2hKF4Ns

Barnes and Noble http://bit.ly/2hKOZTv

I-books http://apple.co/2iBiA2E

Bundle Rabbit https://bundlerabbit.com/products/detail/stolen-tower

Tales of Erana series

Erana

In a world where magic is illegal, and elves enslaved dare you hear the tales of old? Five tales of myth, magic, and monsters from the world of the Light Beyond the Storm Chronicles.

Audio editions narrated by Michael Legate

Amazon.com http://amzn.to/2j0yyEh

Amazon audio http://amzn.to/2hKoUoZ

Audible.com http://adbl.co/2hKOKHP

Amazon UK http://amzn.to/2j0DJnK

Amazon UK audio http://amzn.to/2iBbmM8

Audible UK http://adbl.co/2bxgVrw

Barnes and Noble http://bit.ly/2i31N56

I -books http://apple.co/2hKO19z

Kobo http://bit.ly/2i2W0MR

Tales of Erana: The Warrior’s Curse.

The Warrior

He who bargains with monsters beware! A hero forges an unholy bargain with a witch and learns magic never forgets.

Audio editions narrated by Rob Goll

Amazon.com http://amzn.to/2hHZKm9

Amazon.com audio http://amzn.to/2hKOk4v

Audible.com http://adbl.co/2buD5qk

Amazon UK http://amzn.to/2j0EZXP

Amazon UK audio http://amzn.to/2i2Woev

Audible UK http://adbl.co/2bGSoi4

Barnes and Noble http://bit.ly/2iBu6er

I-books http://apple.co/2j0GNQz

Kobo http://bit.ly/2ivU4gV

Print

https://www.createspace.com/6358394

https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/1534782052/

Tales of Erana Just one Mistake

Tales of Erana: Just One Mistake

Coel, the bard, thinks his life has taken a turn for the worst, but he hasn’t met the Thiefmaster yet. An ill-conceived notion of earning more money to pay off his debt and escape a dark past leaves the minstrel in a situation he can’t escape and with a deadly bargain. Will he survive his mistake? Who is this mysterious patron?

Amazon.com http://amzn.to/2pQADCj

Amazon.co.uk http://amzn.to/2orn0s9

Smashwords https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/696686

Kobo http://bit.ly/2oMTwdh

Barnes and Noble http://bit.ly/2puZ4WL

Print Editions

Amazon.co.uk https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1546421726/

Amazon.com https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1546421726/

Audio

Amazon audio http://amzn.to/2sp7Hqk

Amazon.co.uk http://amzn.to/2tikBCW

Audible.co.uk http://www.audible.co.uk/pd/Sci-Fi-Fantasy/Tales-of-Erana-Audiobook/B071WXK5D3/

The Fire-Side Tales Collection

KitchenImps cover

The Kitchen Imps and Other Dark Tales – six short tales of mayhem and mischief.

Naughty imps, missing socks, cunning thieves and baffled gods feature in this collection of short fantasy fiction.

Amazon.com http://amzn.to/2l8t7Qq

Amazon.co.uk http://amzn.to/2lSvsn3

Kobo http://bit.ly/2qiJ4tH

Audible.co.uk http://adbl.co/2b8oxRZ

Amazon.com – audio http://amzn.to/2lE6EfM

I-Books http://apple.co/2lihgjs

Audible UK http://adbl.co/2brX3D0

Audible.com http://adbl.co/2mfQPPA

I-tunes http://apple.co/2l8Fg7H

Bundle Rabbit https://bundlerabbit.com/products/detail/kitchen-imps-other-dark-tales

Outside the Walls

Outside the Walls by Diana L Wicker

Co-authored with Diana L. Wicker

(Expanded edition)

When the tide of war flows who will be caught in its wake? A short fantasy tale of a woman’s determination in time of war.

Amazon UK http://amzn.to/2lU4vyN

Amazon.com http://amzn.to/2msdchv

Print edition http://amzn.to/2lUbTKG

Kobo http://bit.ly/2btdiiJ

Smashwords http://bit.ly/2lJwb7p

I books http://apple.co/2lStWRQ

Bundle Rabbit https://bundlerabbit.com/products/detail/outside-walls

Audio – Narrated by Melanie Fraser

Amazon.co.uk audio http://amzn.to/2mtHX53

Amazon.com http://amzn.to/2kUP1vi

Audible.co.uk http://adbl.co/2brX3D0

Audible.com http://adbl.co/2lSzqfn

Of Blood and Scales – in Heroika: Dragon Eaters

The fate of the Kingdom of Ilmar rests on a dying child. Only the truly courageous dare to face the ultimate foe and save the realm.

Amazon.com http://amzn.to/2lRDLPf

Amazon.co.uk http://amzn.to/2lHCrN4

Amazon print UK http://amzn.to/2mpBNnn

Paperback US http://amzn.to/2mwZbhY

Audio – narrated by Rob Goll

Audible UK http://adbl.co/2bnbGu1

Audible.com http://adbl.co/2kXAQp2

Amazon audio http://amzn.to/2mpH6mC

 Shattered Mirror1

Shattered Mirror: A Poetry Collection

Amazon.com http://amzn.to/2mivxAU

Smashwords http://bit.ly/2mpNkmH

https://www.createspace.com/6444126

Bundle Rabbit https://bundlerabbit.com/products/detail/shattered-mirror

Audio

Amazon UK audio  http://amzn.to/2mjUUm1

Amazon.com audio http://amzn.to/2lU6C5u

Audible UK http://adbl.co/2cyCQgQ

Legacy of the Mask Tales

Echoes of a Song

mask in hand.halloween concept

A dozen tumultuous years after the dramatic events at the Paris Opera House Raoul, Comte de Chagny is still haunted by the mysterious Opera Ghost – the creature of legend who held staff at the Opera House under his thrall, kidnapped Raoul’s lover and murdered his brother. In Raoul’s troubled imagination the ghosts of the past are everywhere, and a strange and powerful music still calls in his dreams.

Madness, obsession and the legacy of the past weave their spell in this short, tragic tale based on the Phantom of the Opera.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01M1P25XF

https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B01M1P25XF

Madam Giry finds herself embroiled in the tragedy unfolding at the Opera house; mystery and murder stalk the corridors and, it is said, a ghost haunts the place. Giry knows the truth, for she recalls the caged man she met so many years ago. This is her story, their story.

When murder and mystery begin at the Opera House one woman knows who is behind it, and what really lies beneath the mask. Secrets, lies and tragedy sing a powerful song in this ‘might have been’ tale.

A short, tragic tale based on characters from Phantom of the Opera.

tears-of-crimson-velvet

A Legacy of the Mask Tale.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B073TMFF9M

https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B073TMFF9M

The Watcher – A Jack the Ripper Story

watcher-cover-1

The year is 1888, and the place is Whitechapel, in the very heart of London. But the heart is bleeding. A mysterious killer is stalking women of the streets – his true name is unknown but his legend will go down in history. This is a short tale of Jack the Ripper.

18 rated for scenes of violence.

Amazon UK http://amzn.to/2xdkprc

Amazon.com  http://amzn.to/2v6EUsb

Smashwords  http://bit.ly/2xtps6k

Barnes and Noble http://bit.ly/2v6xDZs

Kobo http://bit.ly/2v6zoG6

https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/the-watcher-a-jack-the-ripper-story/id1273647143?mt=11

Bundle Rabbit https://bundlerabbit.com/products/detail/the-watcher

For anthology pieces please check the author profiles

Writing as Alexa Lynsey

Tales of the Golden Mask – An Initiate’s Tale

Golden Mask

Sultry and sensual adventures to warm your cold winter nights or steam up your long summer days. Set in a fantasy world where nothing is quite what it appears, an old book and a strange golden mask bring power and pleasure.

The first installment in the Tales of the Golden Mask

Adult rated. 18+

Amazon.com http://amzn.to/2jTx530

Amazon.co.uk http://amzn.to/2oKfMRx

Smashwords http://bit.ly/2pwYGti

Barnes and Noble http://bit.ly/2kSCtAK

Kobo http://bit.ly/2oJ0pdG

Print edition – Amazon UK http://amzn.to/2okGYFt

Print edition – Amazon.com http://amzn.to/2pexUGn

Bundle Rabbit https://bundlerabbit.com/products/detail/tales-golden-mask

Goodreads https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/33977537-tales-of-the-golden-mask?from_search=true

Alexa Lynsey walks the paths of fantasy regularly; she enjoys writing sultry fiction and ‘sex and sorcery’ stories and reading a wide variety of fiction and fact. A passionate historian and nature lover she sees beauty and knowledge everywhere. When not writing saucy tales her other self is a poet, fantasy writer and blogger.

Contact email GoldenmaskALBD@gmail.com

Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/Alexalynseyauthor/?ref=bookmarks

Twitter: https://twitter.com/GoldenMask17

I hope you enjoyed getting to know Alex. As you can see she is a prolific author and she has lots of stories to share now and in the future.

 

 

 

Genres of Literature – Speculative Fiction


spec fiction

Speculative fiction

Speculative fiction is included in a broad category, which includes science fiction, fantasy, alternate histories (which may have no particular scientific or futuristic component), and even literary stories that contain fantastic elements. It can also be categorized, in some instances with magic realism. In truth speculative fiction is an umbrella genre encompassing narrative fiction with supernatural or futuristic elements.

The genre ranges from ancient works to paradigm-changing and neotraditional works of the 21st century. It is recognized in the author’s intentions or social contexts within the story versions commonly known. The genre was previously termed historical invention (I personally like this term) as characters from various time periods were within the same narrative. And other terms used were mythopoesis or mythopoeia, meaning fictional speculation.

In general it is the creation of a hypothetical history, explanation or ahistorical storytelling. It is not a ‘new’ genre by any means with the genre being used by ancient Greek writers through to the mid 20th century. In its broadest sense the genre captures both conscious and unconscious aspects of human psychology in making sense of the world, and responding to it by creating imaginative, inventive, and artistic expressions.

Interestingly according to publisher statistics, men outnumber women about two to one among English-language speculative fiction writers aiming for professional publication. However, the percentages vary considerably by genre, with women outnumbering men in the fields of urban fantasy, paranormal romance and young adult fiction.

My current work in progress manuscript is a speculative fiction. Life in Slake Patch is set in an alternative future, where the devastation of a World War resulted in the majority of the male population perishing. This created a world-wide matriarchal society.

LifeinSlakePatch 001

Have you written a speculative fiction story/novel?

Care to share the details below in the comments?

And one last note as I found this delightful snippet of information after I had posted on science fiction on 15th January.

26993663_148742022494041_8405279496534370096_n

The story was “True History” by Lucian.