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Genres of Literary – Graphic Novel

August 20, 2018
mandyevebarnett


GraphicNovels

A graphic novel is made up of comic styled content rarely using any words but a lot of pictures. The term “graphic novel” is broadly applied and can include fiction, non-fiction, and anthologized work. This type of novel was originally created in the 1940’s and 50’s. The definition is – a fictional story that is presented in comic-strip format and published as a book.

The Adventures of Obadiah Oldbuck is the oldest recognized American example of a comic subsequently published as a ‘novel’ in 1828. The genre grew in popularity from the 1920’s through to the late 1960’s, when American comic book creators were becoming more adventurous with the form. While, in continental Europe, the tradition of collecting serials of popular strips, such as The Adventures of Tintin became popular.

 Gil Kane and Archie Goodwin’s Blackmark (1971), was a science fiction/sword-and-sorcery paperback published by Bantam Books and described as the very first American graphic novel. It was a 119-page story of comic-book art, with captions and word balloons, published in a traditional book format. 

In response to criticism regarding the content of comic books, and to the establishment of the industry’s self-censorship, Comics Code Authority an underground alternative comix movement was created in the 1970’s.  The term “graphic novel” was intended to distinguish it from the traditional serialized nature of comic books, with which it shared a storytelling medium. One term used was that graphic novels introduced the concept of graphiation, which was a newly coined term used to describe graphic expression or visual enunciation. 

Which graphic novel character is your favorite?

 

Genres of Literature – Fan-fiction

April 2, 2018
mandyevebarnett


 

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The definition of fan fiction or fanfiction is stories created by fans of original works of fiction rather than the original creator. Since the advent of the Internet it has become a popular form of fan labor. It is not commissioned or usually authorized by the original work’s creator or publisher, and is rarely professionally published but rather qualifies under ‘fair use’. Attitudes differ by the original authors and copyright owners of these original works to fan fiction ranging from indifference to encouragement to rejection. Copyright owners have occasionally responded with legal action.The term “fan fiction” came into use in the 20th century. 

Fan fiction is both related to its subject’s canonical fictional universe and simultaneously existing outside it. Most fan fiction writers work is  primarily read by other fans, such as Spockanalia (1967) based on Star Trek, which was mailed to other fans or sold at science fiction conventions. It is interesting to know that women dominated fan fiction initially in 1970 by 83% and increasing to 905 in 1973. Due to the accessibility of the Internet it is estimated fab fiction comprises one third of all content in regards to books. In 1998 the site Fanfiction.Net came online allowing anyone to upload any fandome content onto it’s not-for-profit platform. This practice came to be known as ‘pulling-to-publish’. In 2013 Amazon.com established Kindle Worlds enabling certain licensed media properties to be sold in their kindle store. The terms included 35% of net sales for 10,000 word plus or 20% for short fiction from 5,000 – 10,000 words but with restrictions on content, copyright and poor formatting.

 

Around 1960-1970 in Japan dōjinshi began appearing where independently published manga and novels, (known as dōjinshi), were frequently published by dōjin circles. Many were based on existing manga, anime, and video game franchises. 

Today there are a multitude of fan fiction internet sites for all sorts of genres from comic heroes to romantic couples to TV shows. It is a growing ‘genre’ and a vehicle for many authors to showcase their work.

Have you written fan fiction? 

What or who was your subject?

Why did you decide to write fan fiction?

Childhood Heroes To Be Immortalised in Film…

July 25, 2014
mandyevebarnett


For many of us Enid Blyton will be a reminder of our childhood. Reading the adventures of the Famous Five and imaging ourselves in those situations, caused delight and adventure at bedtime. I read today that there are plans to make a Famous Five movie. See link:

http://www.theguardian.com/books/2014/jul/25/enid-blyton-famous-five-big-screen-adventure

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It is a bold idea when most children nowadays are more interested in technological heroes, machines and violence. It will be interesting to see what sort of adaptation is produced. What are your thoughts on it?

Which childhood book (or books) would you enjoy watching as  a movie?

I love Stig of the Dump, as I can imagine a caveman trying to come to terms with modern day technology and how we ‘buy’ everything instead of making it or fashioning useful articles from whatever we can find.

FunDay

Today’s fun prompt is – How would you adapt your favorite childhood hero into a movie?

Strength In Female Characters & Keeping Their Clothes On…

April 9, 2014
mandyevebarnett


reblogToday’s reblog refers to female lead characters – some awesome advice and views on these blogs.

Have you got a strong female lead in your work?

How do you categorize her?

What traits did you want to show in her character?

Enjoy.

http://corsetsandcutlasses.wordpress.com/2014/03/26/how-to-create-strong-female-characters-in-historical-fiction/

http://corsetsandcutlasses.wordpress.com/2014/04/02/on-writing-strong-female-characters-make-them-human/

 http://ginablaxill.wordpress.com/2014/03/09/what-makes-a-strong-female-character/

Amelia_Earhart,_circa_1928Amelia Earhart – a true hero

Modern day female heroes tend to be portrayed in scantily clad costumes and yearning for a male counterpart – is this really necessary? Can’t women characters be strong, confident and capable without having to be ‘frail’ in some way?

Katniss_EverdeenKatniss Everdeen – make believe hero

What is your view?

 

 

 

Does Your Main Character Reflect a Passing Fancy..?

June 8, 2013
mandyevebarnett


Stalwart – definition: strong and stoutly built

I don’t know about you but this description initially brings to mind a solidly built man. He may be the hero or the villain but his presence can not be ignored either way. My character, Evan in Life in Slake Patch is perfectly formed in my mind. He is about six foot tall, blonde, muscular with blue eyes. Browsing through photos on the internet I found a couple of images that are close to how I see Evan. It was while I was browsing that it struck me that my heart-throb Paul Newman, more thank likely influenced my choice of hero in, this my first, novel. Strange how the mind works sometimes.

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Paul is, (alas I should say was)for me, the perfect human being.

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When characterizing your heroes do you draw from people you know or fancied when you were younger?(or still do!)

I found some great articles regarding hero’s so have linked them here. Enjoy.

http://suite101.com/article/defining-a-literary-hero-a210439

http://thescriptlab.com/screenwriting/character/character-roles/959-your-hero-top-ten-rules-expanded

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