Tag Archives: Judy Schultz

Hard Work Pays Off…


Inkling – definition: a vague notion : hint.

Conference 2013 LOGO_0 Conference Review.

Yesterday was the culmination of six months of organization and hard work. From an inkling of an idea, we changed the format of our writers conference entirely this year. Holding a two hour session in the morning, followed by a Q&A panel and then two separate presentations in the afternoon.

With a change in venue, we were able to set up a classroom style presentation room, which was conducive not only to the attendees but the presenters as well.

We were once again fortunate in our presenters. Each one not only gave excellent orations but were insightful in the Q&A panel utilizing registrants work as the basis of discussion, after critiquing the submissions. Yes we work them hard! But we are extremely grateful.

IPPY award winning Toronto author, Lisa de Nikolits flew in especially for our conference – quite a coo wouldn’t you say? Lisa is an absolute delight and a good friend of mine. Her presentation was 8 Components of Story Writing and it was incredibly helpful to established and novice writers. With only a short coffee break at midway, Lisa managed to enthuse her audience for the whole two hours.

The session after lunch was held by Judy Schultz, who is a nationally renowned travel and food writer, the author of ten books, and the winner of numerous awards including the Robert Kroetsch Book Prize for her fiction novel, Freddy’s War. She is also a very charming, generous woman and has graced our conference before. Judy’s presentation was Non-Fiction – 8 Guidelines, which was not only helpful for non-fiction but also fiction writers. Techniques of writing are interchangeable through any genre or style.

Our third and last session was held by Natasha Deen, who is currently our Writer in Residence. Natasha is hilariously funny and had the room in fits of laughter while giving great information on 8 Steps to Utilize Your WIR. I know that many of the attendees will be submitting work to Natasha, me included.

The Q&A panel included the presenters above as well as Karen Probert, who is a founding member of the Writers Foundation of Strathcona County and the author of Fragments of Lives. Karen continues to be a vital member of the Foundation as the Past President and the Library Liaison. Her insight into the writing craft is splendid.

Registrants and volunteers also enjoyed a wonderful lunch, browsed trade tables and bid on Silent Auction items. There were also displays celebrating the Writers Foundation’s timeline and another highlighting the members past and present. These exhibits were part of the Strathcona County 120 year anniversary celebrations.

With another successful conference under our belts we can breath a sigh of relief…for a short while anyway!

Thank you to everyone that attended and made it such an inspiring and enjoyable day.

Annual Writers Conference…


Peruse – definition: 1) a. to examine or consider with attention and in detail ; study; b. to look over or through in a casual manner 2) read; especially : to read carefully or thoroughly.

Over the last several months I have been working on the Conference Planning Committee of my writing group, the Writers Foundation of Strathcona County. This is our fourth conference and it is always well received. Here are the details – just in case you are planning on coming.

http://www.wfscsherwoodpark.com/fp/chapter-8-discover-your-next-chapter

Conference 2013 LOGO_0

Tips for choosing a conference:

A writer‘s conference gives you the opportunity to learn and network both of which are valuable to the novice and experienced writer. You should consider –

* does the content fit your needs at this stage of your writing? * do the benefits outweigh any costs that might be paid? * what do you hope to gain from your attendance / participation? * does it offer more than bragging rights – are you going just to say you’ve been to a conference or rub elbows with so-and-so? * does it offer a range of opportunities?

When deciding if a conference is worth the time and effort, a writer must look at, not only the cost of going but the benefits gleaned from the experience. Writing is a lonely activity, for the most part, and a chance to make a connection with others who share your passion is a great opportunity but also a big investment. By investment we are not only referring to the fees accompanying conference registration but also the time it takes to attend a conference. Both must be considered thoroughly – would your money be spent wiser elsewhere, or would it be time better spent, say, writing?

The content offered by a conference will either meet your needs or it won’t, depending upon the stage of your writing and the expectations you have for your writing future. “Never stop learning” should be a component of every writer’s life and it drives your decision when you select the workshops you might attend and the value they have to you. Consider if they are introductory, mid-level, or advanced – or are they general enough / specific enough to offer you something to ‘take home.’

The whole purpose in attending a conference should be to further your writing journey. If you are going, just to say you’ve been, or perhaps a chance to slip your unsolicited manuscript into the hands of an unsuspecting editor, think again and reconsider your actions and your reasons for attending. What do you pay? A writer only has to peruse the listing of the many conferences hosted throughout the year and the country to realize that costs vary, with some be out of reach for the emerging writer, or someone on a tight budget. Consider again, the benefits in relation to the cost.

Check out the conference programs and who is hosting the function. A conference about speculative fiction or sci-fi fantasy may intrigue some writers but not everyone writes in this genre and although the fundamentals of writing and character development or plotting apply to any genre, a whole conference geared toward this particular style of work, might not benefit all writers.

If you have to make choices, it might be more appropriate to find a conference geared directly to the type of writing you do or one that offers a range of events, displays, and workshop choices. Most include a trade area with vendors who sell their products and services. Don’t look at this as just an opportunity to spend your money. Consider the value in the research and network aspects of it – meet new people, explore ideas, invest in your experience – it might open up doors to the future of your own writing career.