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Lost Words – Specialists…

April 4, 2016
mandyevebarnett


specialists

agonarch n 1656 -1656
judge of a contest or activity
Our competition will require six agonarchs to ensure fairness.

bumposopher n 1834 -1886
one learned in bumps; a phrenologist
Craniology has progressed greatly since the days of bumposophers.

jobler n 1662 -1662
one who does small jobs
We’ve found a great jobler who takes care of our repairs quickly and cheaply.

lignicide n 1656 -1656
woodcutter
We will not tolerate the lignicides who would despoil our old-growth forests!

oporopolist n 1671 -1725
fruit-seller
Our oporopolist’s oranges often offer odd odours.

orgiophant n 1886 -1886
one who presides over orgies
The orgiophant had dozens of hangers-on who sought to attend his parties.

rhodologist n 1911 -1924
one who studies and classifies roses
Any rhodologist knows that a rose by any other name does not smell as sweet.

seplasiary n 1650 -1658
seller or producer of perfumes and ointments
She had an allergic reaction after the seplasiary sprayed her in the eyes.

snobographer n 1848 -1966
one who describes or writes about snobs
The editors scrapped the society page because it was full of pretentious snobographers.

tragematopolist n 1656 -1658
confectioner; seller of sweets
No tragematopolist can match the appeal of a toy-store for young children.

zygostatical adj 1623 -1656
pertaining to a market official in charge of weights
His zygostatical training allowed him to cheat the scales undetected for decades.

hr-specialist

Remember to stop by this excellent website for more Lost Words – http://phrontistery.info/clw.html

My sentence today took sometime to formulate! Can you do better?

The gentleman’s club divided the members into categories dependent on their respectability and earnings. The oporopolist, rhodologist, seplasiary, bumposopher and tragematopolist were in one group as were the jobler, lignicid, zygostatical and agonarch. However the orgiophant and the snobographer were declined membership.

Lost Words of Medical Terminology (Part Three)…

March 21, 2016
mandyevebarnett


k5888280

There are some rather strange medical conditions in this list!

pilimiction n 1847 -1874
passing of hair-like bodies in the urine
His doctor was particularly concerned about his pilimiction, for obvious reasons.

siagonology n 1895 -1895
study of jaw-bones
Reliance on siagonology alone led to the proliferation of the Piltdown Man hoax.

sireniform adj 1849 -1852
having the lower legs abnormally joined into a single limb
When they learned that their child had a sireniform deformity, they were devastated.

tussicate v 1598 -1890
to cough
He tussicated throughout the opera, annoying nearby audience members.

visotactile adj 1652 -1652
involving both touch and vision
The deaf man learned to make better use of visotactile input in his daily life.

My sentence: As his patient tussicated, the doctor siagonogy for irregular movement. Continuing with visotactile examination he was concerned at his patients admission of pilimiction. To ease his patients worry, the doctor related his investigations into sireniform.

Did you write a sentence with the words?

Doctor_Patient

For more lost words take a look at – http://phrontistery.info/clw4.html

Lost Words of Medical Terminology (Part Two)…

March 14, 2016
mandyevebarnett


bed

ectylotic adj 1736 -1864
removing warts or calluses
Use this ectylotic bandage on your finger and you’ll be cured in a week or two.

jecorary adj 1684 -1684
of or relating to the liver
The alcoholic’s refusal to seek treatment caused him no end of jecorary trouble.

mochlic n 1657 -1753
drastic purgative medicine
This mochlic remedy is worse than the disease, but at least it will be over quickly.

occaecation n 1608 -1691
the act of blinding
After his occaecation, he was unable to enjoy simple pleasures such as reading.

panchymagogue n 1657 -1893
medicine purging all the humours from the body
What you need is a good panchymagogue to get you back on your feet!

My sentence:  The patient had endured the ectylotic treatment without complaint but after the necessary occarcation became depressed. His continued illness required his physicians to prescribe jecorary and panchymagogie at which the patient declined and discharged himself.

How did you use these words?

nu303003

Source of lost words:  http://phrontistery.info/clw4.html

 

 

 

Lost Words – Games & Hobbies…

February 29, 2016
mandyevebarnett


archerypotteryfishing

Today’s words from http://phrontistery.info/clw.html concern games and hobbies. Rather enlightening as to the types of games allowed in times gone by and others that have endured!
Ascoliasm                1706 -1753
boys’ game of beating each other with gloves or leather while hopping
If you think bullies are bad today, look at brutal games of the past like ascoliasm.

Piladex                      1897 -1901
game where an inflated bag is hit with hand to keep aloft across a table
From piladex to hacky-sack, pastimes involving hitting objects are known to all ages.

Riviation                   1676 -1676
fishing
While anglers are the sort who enjoy quiet contemplation, I find riviation to be boring.

Sagittipotent          1656 -1656

having great ability in archeryThe sagittipotent hunter found himself unable to kill the beautiful white stag.

Tornatil                    1661 -1661
made with a wheel; turned on a wheel
The potter was a master of his tornatil work, but many of his pots broke during firing.

My sentence: His over protective mother tried to persuade her son not to indulge in ascoliasm or piladex fearing he may be injured. However, she would encourage riviation, his becoming sagittipotent with a bow or even learn to tornatil in creating pottery.

Can you make a sentence? 

And an extra word because it does celebrate today’s special event – Leap Year.

Bissextus   February 29th: the extra day added to the Julian calendar every fourth year (except those evenly divisible by 400) to compensate for the approximately six hours a year by which the common year of 365 days falls short of the solar year.

Quotes: This odd day was inserted after the sixth day before the kalends of March, i.e., after the 24th of February, and was not counted as an addition to the year, but as a sort of appendix. Hence the sixth of the kalends of March was called bissextus, or double sixth, which root is still retained in our word bissextile, though the day is now added at the end of February. — E. S. Burns, “History of Chronology,” The Popular Science Monthly, April, 1881 Origin Bissextus comes from the Latin term bissextus diēs meaning “intercalary day.” It was so called because the 6th day before the Calends of March (February 24th) appeared twice every leap year.

Lost Words of Displeasure…

February 17, 2016
mandyevebarnett


drunk

Alabandical           1656 -1775
barbarous; stupefied from drink
His behaviour after the party was positively alabandical.

Aretaloger             1623 -1656
braggart; one who boasts about his own accomplishments
While he seemed nice at first, he turned out to be a loudmouthed aretaloger.

Crasial                  1851 -1851
ill-regulated; ill-tempered
The acrasial judge was known for her rants against younger lawyers.

Fallaciloquence      1656 -1761
deceitful speech
Your fallaciloquence, though charming, will not convince the jury to acquit.

Misqueme                    1395 -1658
to displease; to offend
If my actions misqueme you or your friends, you need only leave me alone.

Sevidical                       1656 -1656
speaking cruel and harsh words; threatening
I will not tolerate your sevidical tone and manner, you filthy peasant!

It is my privilege to share these wonderful words with you with the kind approval of Stephen at http://phrontistery.info/clw.html

My sentence: The alabandical man was aretaloger as he shouted crasial and sevidical words in the inn. The landlord admonished his fallaciloquence showing his obvious misqueme.

drunkguy

Let’s see how many of you can make up a sentence!

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