Tag Archives: literary news

Upcoming Writing Events- Add Yours for your Location…


events

This week is Board meeting week – my first meeting is tomorrow for the Writers Foundation of Strathcona County – we will be planning our annual conference, which will be held on 22nd April as well as numerous other agenda items. On Wednesday it is the Arts & Culture Council meeting, where once again planning will be in full swing for our AGM on 12th April and our heritage day event in June. So all in all a busy time for the next few months.

I find that involvement in these boards can be time consuming at times but it brings so many benefits. To be involved with these art organizations gives me the chance to meet new people, experience new art forms and have fun planning events!

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I did manage to attend the open mic event last Wednesday evening and read to a full house! I did worry I would begin coughing but manage to read all of my excerpt from The Twesome Loop without coughing once, although my mouth was arid. There were so many wonderful people to connect with and the readings were excellent. One woman read for the very first time in public while others were old hands. We heard poetry, rants, manuscript excerpts and one young poet (14 years old) read an exceptional piece called Beautiful for Women’s Day. She was amazing.

Do you have any writing or reading events this week? Care to share?

Other events:

wordsthaw

In Victoria, BC, WordsThaw returns to warm the University of Victoria from March 16–20.

A Literary Year in View…


literary news

A New Year brings anticipation of our goals and the fascinating reveals of new books and movies for the year ahead. This literary calendar will keep you informed as well as marking important dates to remember.

http://www.theguardian.com/books/2015/jan/02/books-2015-calendar-year-kazuo-ishiguro-jonathan-franzen-toni-morrison

Are there any that you are excited to see?

Unfortunately I could not find an equivalent for Canada or America so if you do find one please share it.

A Blurring of Genres, Literary News and a Prompt…


FunDayThere is a blending/blurring of genres taking place almost constantly. The latest is crime and fantasy – which by all accounts is not a new genre at all. See this link: http://www.theguardian.com/books/2014/may/15/crime-fantasy-literature-crimefest-bristol-literary-genres

Have you blended genres within your novels? Which ones?

Send your congratulations to the women who have been recognised in the Miles Franklin Prize – http://www.theguardian.com/books/australia-culture-blog/2014/may/15/women-dominate-shortlist-miles-franklin-prize

Quotes:

There is good and mediocre writing within every genre. Margaret Attwood

Genre might certainly increase some of your narrative freedoms, but it also diminishes others. That;s the nature of genre. Junot Diaz

Literary fiction, as a strict genre, is all but dead. Meanwhile, most genres flourish. Dean Koontz

Prompt:

Use opposing genres in a short story or poem to reflect how they can be blurred. Have fun with it. Romance and graphic novel, crime and sci-fi, horror and YA…find one to experiment with.

genre

Author Recognition and Some Fun…


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Yesterday Google celebrated John Steinbeck’s birthday with a doodle. You can view it through this link – http://newsfeed.time.com/2014/02/27/john-steinbeck-google-doodle/?iid=nf-article-mostpop1

Literary heroes are celebrated and rightly so, but shouldn’t they have as much postive fanfare when they are alive? When we list literary greats, many had conflict and dire circumstances in their lives. Would optimistic recognition have helped them or made their particular troubles worse? Some obviously did become the target of media frenzies in modern times but what of earlier authors? Just to take one female author – Charlotte Bronte. She had to write under a man’s name in order to be published and ‘recognized’. In this digital age recognition, whether good or bad is immediate but for these authors they never knew their fame. http://www.policymic.com/articles/62651/9-incredible-writers-who-only-became-famous-after-death

FunDayOn the subject of fame I cannot omit this quote, which in itself is famous!

In the future, everyone will be famous for fifteen minutes. ANDY WARHOL

Fame or infamy, either one is preferable to being forgotten. CHRISTOPHER PAOLINI
And now for your fun prompt – You are a sudden sensation and the media are camped outside your home. How do you handle it?

Save That Bookstore and Write a Story…


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I recently contributed to a fund to help buy a book store. Even though it was thousands of miles away from where I live, I felt it was important to be proactive. Happily, the store was saved from closure by a local person, who has taken over the lease. The lure of ‘one stop’ shopping is hard to resist in a hurried life but once you experience a ‘local’ store and become a regular, you will see the benefits are wide ranging. There is a personal connection, something that is lost in a vast warehouse style mega store. The proprietor will remember you and may put aside books they feel will be of interest to you. There is time to chat and browse without rushing through a shopping list of multiple items.

This week saw a famous author use a large sum to assist small book stores and I think that is not just excellent on his part but also hopefully the spear head for others to follow. Thank you, James Patterson.

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/02/20/business/media/james-patterson-giving-cash-to-bookstores.html?ref=booksandliterature&_r=o

Quotes: 

Nothing leads so straight to futility as literary ambitions without systematic knowledge.  H. G. Wells

To understand a literary style, consider what it omits.   Mason Cooley

FunDay

And now for the fun part: Write a short story about the little bookstore above or your local one.
 
Support your local bookstore. Keep these delightful realms of adventure from closure.