Tag Archives: literature

Friday Fun for Writers, Authors & Readers…


friday_fun

Readers understand this particular joke!

book pile humor

Sure reading a book under a tree is peaceful but imagine how stressful it is for the tree to see a bunch of it’s dead friends in your hand.
– Kyle Lippert

author humor

One advantage reading books has over TV is you can’t read books and do housework at the same time.
– Melanie White

book pain

Upcoming Writing Events- Add Yours for your Location…


This week is a little less hectic with two events on my schedule. Both are enjoyable in different ways. Firstly I am co-hosting a regular writing group in a local senior’s lodge. These meetings are filled with memoir, wisdom and laughter and I feel honored to be a part of it. The meetings began as part of a program my writing foundation created after creating a guide book of sorts. I also co-wrote the book.

Lifetime

This workbook is based on the presentation, Your Lifetime of Stories ~ Ideas for Writing Memoirs, written and presented by the Writers Foundation of Strathcona County (WFSC). Subsequently the group was asked to present this session at various venues in their community. The positive response received, and the request for more information, prompted members of the WFSC to compile the workshop details and comments into a workable format – so you could begin to collect your memories and share your story. This led to a program for residents in local senior lodges and the creation of regular writing groups.

The practical suggestions included in the pages of this book will suggest to you ways you can identify, record, and organize your collection of memories so you can begin to write your stories. It is not a how to write but a how to begin workbook. http://www.dreamwritepublishing.ca/retail/books/your-lifetime-stories

Contributing authors: Mandy Eve-Barnett, Linda J. Pedley, and Karen Probert

My second event is at my local library with a friend and fellow author, who wants to discuss her manuscripts and which direct/project she should pursue. Our last meeting was over lunch but ended up being four hours long! Such a treat to be totally absorbed in our writing life.

article-new_ehow_images_a00_0h_jc_format-manuscript-submission-800x800

What writing or reading events do you have planned this week?

Other local events:

Stories From the Front Porch: Stories for Adults

Strathcona County Library  Mon Mar 20, 7:00pm – 8:45pm
Join Sylvia Hertling and Friends for a cup of tea and to honor the age old tradition of the story-sharing circle.
This informal gathering, powered by TALES Strathcona, celebrates World Storytelling Day with historical, family and personal stories amongst friends. Writer in Residence, Richard Van Camp will also contribute a story at the event.

Edmonton Poetry Festivalhttp://www.edmontonpoetryfestival.com/schedule/

MacEwan University – Book of the Year.

Emily St. John Mandel, author of Station Eleven, Book of the Year 2016/17. The free reading is open to the public on Thursday, March 23 at 7:30 p.m. Emily will be answering questions on-stage and signing books as part of the evening. http://www.macewan.ca/wcm/MacEwanEvents/AnnualEvents/MacEwanBookoftheYear/ThisYear%E2%80%99sBook/index.htm

Thienandbookjacketforeventbrite

Author Madeleine Thien – Arden Theatre – Mar 29, 2017 @ 7:00 PM

St. Albert Public Library presents a STARFest author: Madeleine Thien. The 2016 book from this award-winning novelist and short story writer, Do Not Say We Have Nothing, tells one family’s tale within the unfolding of recent Chinese history. It won the Governor General’s Literary Award for Fiction, and Scotiabank Giller Prize. It was also shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize….
Ottawa’s Versefest runs March 21–26, and it features writers from all around the world.

LitFest NewWest celebrates readers, writers, and community March 31–April 2 in New Westminster, BC.

Add your local events here too

Last Lost Words of This Series…


Today is the last day for my lost words feature – I would like to thank Stephen at http://phrontistery.info/index.html for allowing me to utilize his wonderful site. It has been a learning curve and intriguing to see how many words are no longer used. Some you can understand have lost their relevance but others I think should come back!

I hope you enjoyed the lost words feature and that you will continue to enjoy the subjects for the remainder of the year.

My Monday features from now on will be random – unless someone has a particular topic that they wish me to cover for the remainder of 2016.

Twesome Loop 002

Wednesday‘s will cover reincarnation, life after death and other phenomena and possibly a dash of romance!-  As I will be editing and revising my time-slip romance, The Twesome Loop, which centers on several characters finding their reincarnated soul mates.

Saturday‘s will continue for the prompt contest’s – remember to post your response and then vote for your favorite – chances to win a prize every quarter.

And so to the last lost words:

essomenic adj 1771 -1771
showing things as they will be in the future
The essomenic properties of crystal balls are very much in dispute.

patration n 1656 -1656
perfection or completion of something
The patration of my dissertation will be an occasion for great merriment.

prebition n 1656 -1656
act of offering, showing or setting before
The prebition of his treasure-find to the king earned him great honour and esteem.

My sentence: With the patration of this topic, I offer a essomenic and prebition for the remainder of the year.

Writing Prompt Contest – Ghost Village…


abandoned village in Scotland

The village is abandoned, your footsteps echo in the stillness. Where have the villagers gone? What do you discover?

Have fun with this prompt and leave your response in the comments. 1000 words maximum for a short story. Poems can be any length.

 

Lost Words – Specialists…


specialists

agonarch n 1656 -1656
judge of a contest or activity
Our competition will require six agonarchs to ensure fairness.

bumposopher n 1834 -1886
one learned in bumps; a phrenologist
Craniology has progressed greatly since the days of bumposophers.

jobler n 1662 -1662
one who does small jobs
We’ve found a great jobler who takes care of our repairs quickly and cheaply.

lignicide n 1656 -1656
woodcutter
We will not tolerate the lignicides who would despoil our old-growth forests!

oporopolist n 1671 -1725
fruit-seller
Our oporopolist’s oranges often offer odd odours.

orgiophant n 1886 -1886
one who presides over orgies
The orgiophant had dozens of hangers-on who sought to attend his parties.

rhodologist n 1911 -1924
one who studies and classifies roses
Any rhodologist knows that a rose by any other name does not smell as sweet.

seplasiary n 1650 -1658
seller or producer of perfumes and ointments
She had an allergic reaction after the seplasiary sprayed her in the eyes.

snobographer n 1848 -1966
one who describes or writes about snobs
The editors scrapped the society page because it was full of pretentious snobographers.

tragematopolist n 1656 -1658
confectioner; seller of sweets
No tragematopolist can match the appeal of a toy-store for young children.

zygostatical adj 1623 -1656
pertaining to a market official in charge of weights
His zygostatical training allowed him to cheat the scales undetected for decades.

hr-specialist

Remember to stop by this excellent website for more Lost Words – http://phrontistery.info/clw.html

My sentence today took sometime to formulate! Can you do better?

The gentleman’s club divided the members into categories dependent on their respectability and earnings. The oporopolist, rhodologist, seplasiary, bumposopher and tragematopolist were in one group as were the jobler, lignicid, zygostatical and agonarch. However the orgiophant and the snobographer were declined membership.

Writing Prompt -Sudden Departure…


56e68a761bcd9_sheldonsfans

Like a time capsule the bedroom told a story of its old inhabitants. It is up to you to tell that story.

Join in and enter for the quarterly prize for the top voted response to these weekly prompts – so make sure you comment below to enter the contest. 1000 word maximum.

Lost Words – Describing My Easter Mountain Escape…


Jasper Mountains_n

Jasper National Park

apanthropinization                      1880 -1880
withdrawal from human concerns or the human world
His life as a hermit in the woods was characterized by apanthropinization.

desarcinate                                     1656 -1736
to unload; to unburden
She haughtily ordered her butler to desarcinate her baggage from the car.

locupletative                                 1802 -1812
tending to enrich
Your locupletative contributions have helped furnish the new stadium lavishly.

montivagant                                1656 -1658
wandering over hills and mountains
The montivagant hiker crossed the Alps with ease but was stymied by the Andes.

patration                                       1656 -1656
perfection or completion of something
The patration of my dissertation will be an occasion for great merriment.

stagma                                            1681 -1820
any distilled liquor
I will touch neither wine nor stagma, though I do occasionally partake of ale.

More lost words here:
http://phrontistery.info/clw.html

My good friend Linda and I escaped to the mountains for a long weekend over Easter. These words describe our experience to some extent.

We relished the apanthropinization from daily stresses to the Rocky Mountains. The glorious scenery, good company and a splash of stagma enabled us to desarcinate our troubles for a brief respite. Our montivagant and immersion into nature really locupletative our souls. In addition we were able to patration writing projects too. A recharging for our souls and sustenance for our mind and body.

Mediation Circle, Grande Cache

Meditation Circle_n

Writing Prompt – Abandoned Fun…


56e68a70ef65c_sheldonsfans

Tell the story of this abandoned Ferris Wheel. What it saw, felt and misses about its heyday. What is it’s future?

Join in and enter for the quarterly prize for the top voted response to these weekly prompts – so make sure you comment below to enter the contest. 1000 word maximum.

Lost Words – Scribes By Another Name…


Again my thanks to Stephen for allowing me to share his wonderful glossary of lost words. If you are curious why not go and check it out!  http://phrontistery.info/clwdef.html

writer

Today we have many words that mean writer. They are categorized by the genre or type of writing we do.

author. biographer. columnist. correspondent. critic. dramatist. editor. essayist. journalist. novelist.  poet. reporter. screenwriter. contributor. freelancer. ghostwriter. scribbler. scribe. stenographer. stringer. wordsmith. newspaper person. person of letters. scripter.

These lost words should stay within the writing realm, don’t you think?

archigrapher                                                   1656 -1656

principal or head secretary or clerkhttp://phrontistery.info/index.html

The archigrapher efficiently designated transcription duties to her underlings.

 

artigrapher                                           1753-1753

writer or composer of a grammar; a grammarian artigrapher

Today’s prescriptivists are no better than the artigraphers of the Renaissance.

kalotypography                                                         1834 -1834

beautiful printing

 

Medieval manuscripts are attractive, but modern kalotypography surely surpasses them

script

 

 

Interview with Claire Luana…


Headshot Claire
What inspired you to write your first book?
My husband and I were on our honeymoon and talking a lot about life. He asked me what I would do if I could do anything. I realized the answer was to write a novel. So I figured I should just go ahead and do it!

Tell us about your book!
In the country of Kita, the sentence for being a female sorceress—a moonburner—is death. So when the main character, Kai, is exposed as a moonburner, she is forced to escape to neighboring Miina, where moonburners are revered and trained as warriors. But the moonburner citadel is not the place of refuge and learning that Kai imagined. The ongoing war against the male sorcerers, or sunburners, has led the citadel leadership down a dark path that could spell the end of all burners. After uncovering an unexpected secret in her own heritage, Kai realizes that she may be the one person able to bring peace to the two warring countries.

How did you come up with the title?
I worked for several months outlining a trilogy of novels. But every time I started writing, I got stuck. I had another idea hanging around in the back of my mind and I decided to give into it. Within about 10 minutes I had a one-page outline of the plot and the title for Moonburner, my first novel. I think it’s really true what they say about the muse striking you!

Of the characters you have created or envisioned, which is your favorite & why?
Quitsu! My protagonist, Kai, has an animal companion, a magical talking fox named Quitsu. He was definitely the comic relief, and I had a lot of fun writing his snarky comments.

Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?
That the world isn’t black or white, but shades of grey. All the “good guys” aren’t good in the book, and all the “bad guys” aren’t bad. If Kai gave in to stereotypes and prejudices, she would have missed out on some of her greatest friends and allies. You have to gauge each person individually based on their character and actions, not because they belong in a particular gender, race, or political group.

What makes Moonburner different?
I think Moonburner is unique because the moral of the story isn’t good triumphing over evil. It’s about mutually assured destruction…if you can’t find a way to work together and coexist, you will both perish.

What do you enjoy most about writing?
I love the creativity of it. I’m a practicing lawyer for my full time job, and so I spend a lot of time being analytical and precise. I love the freedom to let my mind take me where it takes me with writing. I thought because I am such a type–A planner that I would be a “plotter,” making detailed outlines of every part of my book before I wrote a word. I found that in fact, I do much better when I let my creativity take the wheel. That has been a very refreshing discovery.

What is your favorite theme/genre to write?
I have always loved to read and write fantasy. There is something about being taken away to another magical world that provides just the right escape I am looking for with a novel. My goal with Moonburner was to write a novel that I would enjoy reading.

What is the current status of Moonburner?
I am seeking a publisher for Moonburner currently, so you can’t read it quite yet! But it will either be picked up for publication or I will self-publish in 2016. I am also about 90% done with the first draft of Sunburner, the sequel.
How do we find your books, blog and bio?
Come see me at claireluana.com. That’s where you’ll find my blog, as well as updates about Moonburner and Sunburner.

Twitter @clairedeluana