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Creative Edge Author Interview – Shane Wilson

April 8, 2021
mandyevebarnett


1. How old were you when you wrote your first writing project? What genre was it?

That’s hard to say. I was writing short stories and designing cover art when I was in second grade. I was writing screenplays and making movies in middle school. I published poetry in college. I started writing my first novel, A Year Since the Rain, when I was in my late twenties, I guess. It was a magical realism novel, and it took a few years for me to finish it.

2. Do you have a favorite genre? What draws you to it?

I like contemporary fantasy/ magical realism because I think these genres allow for an interesting exploration of human experience. I appreciate the ways that realistic characters and settings are allowed to bump up against elements of magic.

3. How does your expression differ from your poetry to short stories to novels?

I look for poetic language in everything, so I try to find something poetic in narrative work as well. Obviously, it’s harder to keep this up for 70,000 words than it is in a page of poetry, but I still look for ways to elevate the diction of my prose with poetic language. With poetry, we’re talking about a stricter economy of language—more limitations based on form and so forth. As a rule, though, my poetry plays with narrative and my prose plays with poetry. I like to explore the marriage of different forms.

4. Magic plays a vital part in your stories – is it a fascination for you?

Like I said before, I think the incorporation of magic in otherwise real settings allows for an interesting exploration of human nature and human experience. If most of the setting and characters feel somewhat familiar, I think readers can buy in a little more. Also, I think the world is full of magic, right? We all experience wonderful and terrible things that we can’t explain. These inexplicable moments are a very human kind of magical experience. That’s how I see it, at any rate.

5. How did you create the characters in your World of Muses Universe?

A lot of my characters are just conflations of real-life people. There are no direct translations of real people, but I definitely mine real life experience for characters.

6.  Are there messages in your stories for your readers? What are they?

Absolutely. These messages vary, but I think that mostly I want readers to consider their relationship with the world, with other people, with creativity, and with their own experience. I’m not prescriptive in my messaging. I just want a reader to think.

7.  You combine music with poetry/stories – how did this idea/collaboration begin?

I wanted to write a story that would explore creativity and the different goals artists might strive toward. I settled on musicians and visual artists (because, again, I don’t want to write things that are too close to home). When I decided to write about musicians, I started teaching myself to play guitar. I wanted to understand what I was writing, and I wanted to be able to describe it in an organic way that would provide the narrative with a realistic texture. In the long run, I fell in love with the guitar and started writing songs. I even wrote some of the songs from that novel. It’s a cool experience to play these songs at live readings. I think it lends an air of legitimacy to the story.

8. Has your teaching influenced your writing?

I’m not sure that teaching has had a direct influence on my writing. I’ve never written about a teacher or even students. I actively try to avoid writing stories that would hit too close to home in that way. So, I guess in my attempts to write stories from outside of my experience as a teacher, teaching has indirectly influenced my writing.

On another level, though, I do teach literature courses. Reading these classics with my students offers me a great refresher in these stories. I think reading and analysis of stories is incredibly important to a writer, so the fact that this is my job gives me ample opportunity to dive back into those stories from time to time.

I think that my writing has probably influenced my teaching, but that feels like a whole other conversation.

9. Has your MFA course in Creative Writing changed how you write?

I think the most important thing I’ve learned from the MFA is how to better discipline my writing. I have a better sense of how planning and outlining can help streamline a project. The MFA program also forced me to read and work in genres I was less comfortable with, and I think all of that experimentation is good for the process. We could all do with a little more of that experience with discomfort.

10.  Do you have a message for your readers?

This is an interesting question. I’m not sure that I’ve ever considered the prospect of speaking directly to the people who read my books. I’ve long considered the writing to be the final word in my part of the conversation. Once a reader has read my book, I’m interested in what that reader has taken from that experience. So, I suppose if I could say anything to the people who read my books it’s this: Thanks! I hope you found something to enjoy.

11.  Where can readers find your books?

My books are available from all major retailers, but the easiest way to find my work is on my website, http://www.shanewilsonauthor.com

12. Do you have a blog? Where are you on social media?

I don’t really have a blog that I keep up with consistently at the moment, but people can always catch up with me on social media. I’m @ThatShaneWilson just about anywhere you might care to look.

Bio

Shane Wilson is an award-winning author of magical realism and low fantasy. His two novels,  A Year Since the Rain and The Smoke in His Eyes are available through all major retailers. He has also published short fiction, creative nonfiction, and poetry. He maintains a blog that focuses on a variety of topics including topics in publication.

Shane has a Master’s degree in English from Valdosta State University and has taught English at community colleges in Georgia and North Carolina. He has been te

 Shane Wilson is a storyteller. No matter the medium, the emphasis of his work is on the magical act of the story, and how the stories we tell immortalize us and give voice to the abstractions of human experience. His first two contemporary fantasy novels as well as a stage play, set in his World of Muses universe, are currently available.

 Born in Alabama and raised in Georgia, Shane is a child of the southeastern United States where he feels simultaneously at-home and out-of-place. He graduated from Valdosta State University in South Georgia with a Masters in English. He taught college English in Georgia for four years before moving to North Carolina in 2013.

 Shane plays guitar and writes songs with his two-man-band, Sequoia Rising. He writes songs as he writes stories–with an emphasis on the magic of human experience. He tends to chase the day with a whiskey (Wild Turkey 101) and a re-run of The Office.

 Shane’s novels are A Year Since the Rain (Snow Leopard Publishing, 2016) and The Smoke in His Eyes (GenZ Publishing, 2018). Shane’s short story, “The Boy Who Kissed the Rain” was the 2017 Rilla Askew Short Fiction Prize winner and was nominated for a 2018 Pushcart Prize. An adaptation of that story for the stage was selected for the Independence Theater Reading Series in Fayetteville, NC. More information about Shane can be found at: Shane Wilson Author

Genres of Literature – Magic Realism

August 27, 2018
mandyevebarnett


Magical

Magical realism, magic realism, or marvelous realism is a genre of narrative fiction that encompasses a range of subtly different concepts. These express a primarily realistic view of the real world, while adding or revealing magical or supernatural elements presented in an otherwise real-world or mundane setting.

Matthew Strecher defined magic realism as “what happens when a highly detailed, realistic setting is invaded by something too strange to believe”. 

The characteristics listed below can be included but not exclusively.

Fantastical elements

Fantasy traits are given to characters, such as levitation, telepathy, and telekinesis, which help to encompass modern political realities that can be phantasmagorical.

Real-world setting

The fantasy elements provides the basis for magical realism in the real world. The author does not invent new worlds but reveals the magical in it. In other words, the supernatural realm blends with the natural, familiar world.

Authorial reticence

This is the deliberate withholding of information and explanations about the disconcerting fictitious world by the author, which proceeds with “logical precision” as if nothing extraordinary took place. Magical events are presented as ordinary occurrences. 

More recent examples are Life of Pi and Big Fish.

Do you write or read magical realism?

What is your favorite book in this genre?

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