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Author Interview – P.D. Workman

April 2, 2019
mandyevebarnett


AuthorInterview

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What inspired your latest novel?

The first book in this new series, What the Cat Knew was actually inspired by a dream my husband had! I hadn’t written any paranormal before this, haven’t written any kind of fantasy for decades, and I decided to give it a try.

How did you come up with the title?

I brainstormed a number of ideas, checked to see how many were already in use, and tried them out on the cover to see how they looked. The “cat” themed title has carried through the first three books, I’m not sure whether it will carry through the rest of the series.

Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

There are a number of messages in What the Cat Knew; that people should be what they are and pursue their natural talents; that things are not always as they appear; not to judge a book by its cover; that there are many different kinds of talents; and one that is fleshed out more in the next two books… the issue of consent.

cat knew new copy

How much of the book is realistic?

These books are paranormal mystery, so there are witches, spiritual messages, other psychic phenomena and magical races. But it is a balancing act between the concrete, “real” world that Reg has always tried to survive in, and the new magical world she is just getting to know.

Are your characters based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

In some of my books, yes. In What the Cat Knew, there is not much that is pulled from my own experience.

Where can readers find you on social media and do you have a blog?

You can find me on most social media with the name pdworkmanauthor.

https://www.facebook.com/pdworkmanauthor

https://www.instagram.com/pdworkmanauthor/

My website and blog is at pdworkman.com.

Do you have plans or ideas for your next book? Is it a sequel or a stand alone?

I have three books written in the Reg Rawlins, Psychic Detective series so far, and you can expect more after that. You can find out my plans for the rest of the year at https://pdworkman.com/upcoming-in-2019

Of the characters you have created or envisioned, which is your favorite & why?

I created this spin-off series from the Auntie Clem’s Bakery series because I liked Reg Rawlins so much and saw that she had a lot of potential as a character, so she is at the top of the list. But I also really enjoyed the psychic cat, Starlight, and Sarah, the feisty old witch. The villainous Corvin is a lot of fun to write and really rounds out the story and adds intrigue. In books two and three, I started to explore some other magical races and have had a lot of fun with Callie and Ruan.

Of all of the stories/series that I am working on right now, the character I think I am enjoying the most is Zachary Goldman.

Do you favor one type of genre or do you dabble in more than one?

I write crime fiction, but that has turned out to be quite a wide umbrella, ranging from suspense/thriller to P.I. mystery, to cozy mystery, and now paranormal cozy mystery. I have both young adult and adult books and series. They all tend to focus on outcasts, underdogs, and social issues.

mockup-books 1-3

Do you plan your stories, or are you a seat of the pants style writer?

For thirty years I only wrote seat-of-the-pants. I have been writing using mind-maps and outlines the last few years, but I still occasionally pants a novel here and there. Because I am writing a lot in series right now, the books tend to develop a general shape that is reflected in each book in the series, so there is less planning to do in the later books, and I am settling into a sort of minimalist outline plan right now.

What is your best marketing tip?

I struggle with marketing. It doesn’t come nearly as naturally as the writing itself. Learn from others, try new things, and be willing to stick with what works.

Do you find social media a great tool or a hindrance?

While I am in a number of writing groups, I tend to answer other people’s questions more than to write mine. It can be good entertainment, but I find it best not to spend too much time on social media.

OPTIONAL QUESTIONS

What do you enjoy most about writing?

I like to work out the emotions I am feeling and get my thoughts down on paper, to produce something that both entertains and makes people think. I love the creative process and sitting down and rereading my characters’ stories again and again.

What age did you start writing stories/poems?

I wrote my first novel-length fiction at age 12. I have always loved writing and making books and have some of the little construction-paper books that I stapled together written in scribbles before I could even read or write.

What genre are you currently reading?

I am reading a murder mystery right now. I read a lot of crime, with some YA, literary, and nonfiction thrown in.

Do you read for pleasure or research or both?

I read mostly for pleasure. I do a lot of research, but generally rely on articles and short non-fiction rather than novels. I don’t generally analyze the writing of the fiction books I am reading, though I do take note if there are things I particularly like or don’t like.

Do you see writing as a career?

I am hoping to make it my full-time career in the next couple of years. I currently work full-time hours at my writing business as well as at my day job.

Bio:

P.D. Workman was born and raised in Alberta, Canada. She writes riveting young adult and mystery/suspense books dealing with mental illness, addiction, abuse, and other social issues. She has won several literary awards from Library Services for Youth in Custody for her young adult fiction. She currently has over 30 published titles and can be found at pdworkman.com. She has been married for 25 years and has one son.

 

 

 

Writing Prompt Wednesday

February 21, 2018
mandyevebarnett


9781608636921

Prompt – Write about a Fairy

To be honest this was an easy prompt for me as the character written about, Petal Soft, is one from my children’s chapter book.

Petal Soft flew in and out of the long grass in the meadow, stopping occasionally to inspect a flower, one here, and one there. Her fairy wings glistened in the sunshine. She was looking for the perfect hat. The snowdrop hat she wore was tattered and worn now and it was time to replace it. With the warmth of spring sunshine and gentle showers the meadow grew lush. The green grass was dotted with all the colours of the rainbow by beautiful flowers opening their petals to the sky.
            Should she choose yellow, which was a bright cheerful colour or red to be more dramatic at the fairy dance? As she flew back and forth, Petal Soft considered each flower and its colour carefully. The dance was a special one not only to celebrate spring but also to mingle with fairies from far and wide. Petal wanted to meet a certain fairy whose magic was said to be more powerful than any other. If Petal could learn just one of those extraordinary spells she would be so happy.
            Along the edge of the meadow grazing contently stood three deer, they glanced up as Petal passed by but were not alarmed. She smiled and flew forward and gasped in surprise when she saw the most beautiful flower. It was a woodland orchid almost hidden in the shade of a birch tree. Its soft cream colour was splashed with bright pink it was perfect.
            Bowing low, Petal asked the flower if she could take it. A whisper of wind was the only answer needed. Plucking the flower from the stem, Petal turned the petals this way and that appreciating their beauty.
            On the night of the dance, Petal Soft adorned her head with the stunning orchid and wore a cream dress so as not to detract from its beauty. When she flew into the gathering place all heads turned to admire her hat.

         She met the elder that night and became her apprentice learning special spells all because her orchid hat was the most beautiful. 

Meet Petal again in Ockleberries to the Rescue. http://www.dreamwritepublishing.ca/products/ockleberries-rescue

Ockleberries cover

She also appears in a story in this newly released anthology.

https://www.amazon.ca/Fireflies-Fairy-Dust-Fantasy-Anthology-ebook/dp/B079KFLXZC

Fireflies & Fairy Dust

Try your hand at writing a story about a fairy. I would love to read it.

 

Imagination – A Writers Tool…

June 9, 2014
mandyevebarnett


articles
As writers we utilize our imaginations to make the unimaginable into reality in our narratives. There are no barriers, no limits to what we can create. Distant worlds, alternative realities and curious creatures are brought to life for our readers.

Our imaginations are a vital tool for our writing and we need to encourage it to flourish. We already ‘see’ things others may not even consider as story potential – such as a unique hairstyle, a particular speech pattern or even an outfit. Being able to incorporate things we see, hear and touch, no matter their original source, is how we create. Let your imagination free and enjoy the process of creation.

How do you ensure your imagination is not stifled? 

type writer imagine

It may seem rather ‘easy’ to create a whole new world, but in actual fact there are numerous hurdles we need to jump, metaphorically speaking. Fantasy readers, in particular, are extremely meticulous in their review and the consistency in fantasy works and the ‘laws’ of the land therein. This fact is obvious when you see the amount of sci-fi conventions and the followers of such programs as Star Trek.

 

 

This Q&A page is a great way to find out if your creation will stand up to scrutiny.

http://www.sfwa.org/2009/08/fantasy-worldbuilding-questions/

And a great link for tips on world building here:

http://www.malindalo.com/2012/10/five-foundations-of-world-building/

Of course world building is not restricted to fantasy. If you are setting your narrative in a particular time period you must ensure everything your characters use and interact with, are from that era. A 1940’s housewife will not have the luxury of a microwave oven, for example. However, when you have time travel within your story greater detail is required to ensure each era is true to its original. This not only gives the reader clues as to where and when your characters are but also gives your protagonist obstacles to overcome. Unless of course you have a time traveler visiting!

A friend of mine. J.E. McKnight, is an excellent time travel author and he is meticulous in ensuring the ‘time-line’ is correct as well as ensuring the ‘vehicle’ of travel is believable. You can purchase his book here: https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/264043

With attention to detail and solid back story, every narrative can be believable no matter how fantastical the characters, creatures or situations. Most of us ‘believe’ in Hobbits, Harry Potter and the like because the narratives are so strong in the basics of world building.

I have used reincarnation in my novel,The Twesome Loop, an alternative future  in Life in Slake Patch and magical creatures  in Ockleberries to the Rescue. If you can imagine the inconceivable – you can write it.

What worlds, characters or creatures have you created?

Imagination

 

 

Can You Create Your Own Myth..?

February 17, 2014
mandyevebarnett


In the world of make-believe, writers have the ability to create a believable world of their own making. Research into the ‘known’ myths and legends will assist in the ‘format’ of creating their own tale. From fantastical creatures to other worldly habitats to super powers, everything is possible.mythical-creaturesTaking an idea from conception to fully developed narrative is the path every writer wants.

Whether  utilizing a known god or goddess or a creature, or using your imagination to make one from scratch, compiling a ‘life’ around them is the focus.

Asking questions, being inquisitive and ‘seeing’ alternatives will result in an idea that an author can run with.

The questions need not be deep or difficult. Maybe ask where the consciousness of the Phoenix goes when it is between egg and rising? How a unicorn cleans it horn? Do mermen serve the mermaids?

A childlike curiosity is a writer’s best friend when creating magical elements to a story. Even if the novel will be for adults. We all love to be transported into another world. That is the joy of books.

Maybe you have a favorite mythical creature that sparks your imagination. Why not share?

I coupled my love of wildlife and magical creatures into my children’s chapter book, Ockleberries to the Rescue. The woodland sprites live within their forest home to help the animals that reside there. Research into sprites, pixies, elves and the like was fun and I got to read through my gnome and fairies books too.

Ockleberries

Making the Inconceivable Believable…

December 27, 2013
mandyevebarnett


Inconceivable – definition: not conceivable; unimaginable; unthinkable

Glen

Writers have the ability to make the unimaginable reality in their narratives. There are no barriers, no limits to what a writer can create. Distant worlds, alternative realities and curious creatures are brought to life for the reader.

It may seem rather ‘easy’ to create a whole new world, but in actual fact there are numerous hurdles you have to jump. Fantasy readers, in particular, are extremely meticulous in ensuring consistency in a fantasy work and the ‘laws’ of the land therein.

This Q&A page is a great way to find out if your creation will stand up to their scrutiny.

http://www.sfwa.org/2009/08/fantasy-worldbuilding-questions/

And a great link for tips on world building here:

http://www.malindalo.com/2012/10/five-foundations-of-world-building/

Of course world building is not restricted to fantasy. If you are setting your narrative in a particular time period you must ensure everything your characters use and interact with, are from that era. A 1940’s housewife will not have the luxury of a microwave oven, for example. However, when you have time travel within your story greater detail is required to ensure each era is true to its original. This not only gives the reader clues as to where and when your characters are but also gives your protagonist obstacles to overcome. Unless of course you have a time traveler visiting!

With attention to detail and solid back story, every narrative can be believable no matter how fantastical the characters, creatures or situations. Most of us ‘believe’ in Hobbits, Harry Potter and the like because the narratives are so strong in the basics of world building.

I have used reincarnation (The Twesome Loop), an alternative future (life in Slake Patch) and magical creatures (Ockleberries to the Rescue)  in some of my novels. If you can imagine the inconceivable – you can write it.

What fantastical worlds have you created?

How did you decide on the ‘laws’?

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