Mandy Eve-Barnett's Official Blog

Inspiration for Writers & Building A Community ©

Lost Words of Medical Terminology (Part Three)…

March 21, 2016
mandyevebarnett


k5888280

There are some rather strange medical conditions in this list!

pilimiction n 1847 -1874
passing of hair-like bodies in the urine
His doctor was particularly concerned about his pilimiction, for obvious reasons.

siagonology n 1895 -1895
study of jaw-bones
Reliance on siagonology alone led to the proliferation of the Piltdown Man hoax.

sireniform adj 1849 -1852
having the lower legs abnormally joined into a single limb
When they learned that their child had a sireniform deformity, they were devastated.

tussicate v 1598 -1890
to cough
He tussicated throughout the opera, annoying nearby audience members.

visotactile adj 1652 -1652
involving both touch and vision
The deaf man learned to make better use of visotactile input in his daily life.

My sentence: As his patient tussicated, the doctor siagonogy for irregular movement. Continuing with visotactile examination he was concerned at his patients admission of pilimiction. To ease his patients worry, the doctor related his investigations into sireniform.

Did you write a sentence with the words?

Doctor_Patient

For more lost words take a look at – http://phrontistery.info/clw4.html

Lost Words of Medical Terminology (Part Two)…

March 14, 2016
mandyevebarnett


bed

ectylotic adj 1736 -1864
removing warts or calluses
Use this ectylotic bandage on your finger and you’ll be cured in a week or two.

jecorary adj 1684 -1684
of or relating to the liver
The alcoholic’s refusal to seek treatment caused him no end of jecorary trouble.

mochlic n 1657 -1753
drastic purgative medicine
This mochlic remedy is worse than the disease, but at least it will be over quickly.

occaecation n 1608 -1691
the act of blinding
After his occaecation, he was unable to enjoy simple pleasures such as reading.

panchymagogue n 1657 -1893
medicine purging all the humours from the body
What you need is a good panchymagogue to get you back on your feet!

My sentence:  The patient had endured the ectylotic treatment without complaint but after the necessary occarcation became depressed. His continued illness required his physicians to prescribe jecorary and panchymagogie at which the patient declined and discharged himself.

How did you use these words?

nu303003

Source of lost words:  http://phrontistery.info/clw4.html

 

 

 

Lost Words of Medical Terminology (Part One)…

March 7, 2016
mandyevebarnett


feeling sick

There are numerous lost words concerning the body, its functions and medical terminology, so I split them into three parts.

Thank you to Steven at http://phrontistery.info/clw4.html

Aporrhoea                                      1646 -1880
a bodily emanation; an effluvium
The evening’s revelries were followed by an unfortunate episode of aporrhoea.

Brochity                                          1623 -1678
projecting or crooked quality of teeth
His parents later regretted that they did not correct his brochity in his youth.

Cagastric                                          1662 -1753
of diseases, originating under an ill star
We no longer believe in cagastric causes for illness and deformity.

Caprizant                                          1730 -1736
of the pulse, uneven or irregular
While he hadn’t had a full-blown heart attack, his pulse was very caprizant.

Dipsopathy                                      1883 -1883
medical treatment involving abstinence from liquids
The new antibiotics he was taking required him to practice strict dipsopathy.

My sentence: The party guests avoided the aporrhoea of the man with the brochity. A doctor aided the man after checking his caprizant, to the washroom. Although the doctor’s advice was dipsopathy the man argued he was cagastric.

Can you write a sentence too?

feeling-ill

 

 

Blog at WordPress.com.