Mandy Eve-Barnett's Blog for Readers & Writers

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Creative Edge – Author Interview – Tricia Silverman

December 31, 2020
mandyevebarnett


  1. What motivated you to write this book?

I wrote this book as a way to help people beyond what I share in a one-hour seminar or coaching session. The book takes a deeper dive into so many areas of nutrition and wellness. I have been a dietitian for over 24 years, and have a lot of nutrition tips and stories to share. Other books have motivated me to write my own. The Blue Zones books by Dan Buettner give wellness tips, along with vivid stories of his visits to some of the oldest and healthiest people in the world. I am fascinated by longevity, and when I read my first Blue Zones book, I loved that the book wasn’t just telling you what to do. The helpful wellness tips were woven into the stories that were shared. In my book, I wrote about a 102 year old man who is still driving and enjoying life. Another story is about a man I met who is now 98 and is still cooking for his daughter. When I first met him after a seminar I presented at a senior center, he appeared to be in his low 80’s, if not younger. I found out he was 95 at the time, and it was a surreal moment. I was just finishing up doing a presentation on the Mediterranean diet, and here in front of me was a living example of how this way of eating and living surely does lend itself to longevity. We have become friends. I’ve called him periodically during the Covid shutdowns to make sure he is okay, and we have exchanged fun gifts for holidays and birthdays. His friendship is the best gift of all. My mission is to learn and then share what I’ve learned in fun and meaningful ways to help others improve their lives. My book is one way to do this.

  • Is there a specific age group the book is geared towards?

I had adults in mind when I wrote the book. I have noticed that the book especially resonates for those 50 and up.

  • Do you feel nutrition should be taught in all grades of schools?

The first review of my book that came in mentioned how the information should be shared in schools. I wholeheartedly agree that nutrition should be taught in schools and for all grades. When I worked in school food service, I applied for grants that provided nutrition education in creative ways. One way was that I arranged for an entire elementary school grade to go on a hike, with healthy lunch provided, plus a nutrition talk for the kids during the day. Another way was to have a chef join the school food service staff to promote healthy meals to teenagers. I think that nutrition can be fun and taught in creative ways that appeal to all ages. I always liked show-and-tell as a kid, and my model of teaching for adults is show-and-tell model. I use lots of props and fun demonstrations. My virtual seminars have been a hit, as I have shown a lot of shocking things that make people think about their food consumption, such as all the sugar in one seasonal frozen coffee drink. It has more sugar than an entire container of ice cream!

  • Can you share a tip on how to eat a balanced diet?

I developed a plate to emphasize balance. It’s based on studying what people eat across the world to stay healthy. I call it the NuTricia’s Plate. See the graphic below. Half of the plate is vegetables. A great way to mimic this plate is to make sure that you vegetables cover half of your plate at lunch and dinner, and hopefully some vegetables during snacks, and maybe even breakfast, too. A quarter of your plate should be a small portion of healthy starchy carbohydrates such as whole grains (for example, brown rice, quinoa, and whole wheat pasta), or potatoes, or corn. A quarter of the plate should be a protein rich food such as beans, fish, chicken, or turkey. People should consider having at least 3 small servings of fruit a day, and healthy fats such as nuts, seeds, avocados, and extra virgin olive oil as parts of meals and snacks. Water should be consumed throughout the day.

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  1. How can someone with physical restrictions improve their movement?

If you have physical restrictions, then focus on what you can do. Ask your doctor for guidance, and see a physical therapist. Physical therapists can help solve or lessen many pain problems. They are such a great resource. I have gone through many rounds of physical therapy over the years for different injuries and conditions, and some of the results have been pretty miraculous! Focusing on what you can do can have huge positive mental and physical benefits. Many fantastic exercises stretching and strengthening exercises can be done from a chair.

6.     Did your parents encourage your healthy lifestyle? Somewhat. There was the good the bad, and the downright ugly. The good was that there were lots of health books and magazines around the house, and my mom made very balanced dinners. The bad was that the lunches I brought to school were often cold cut sandwiches on white rolls with no veggies or fruit. The ugly was that my family would have weekend “pig-outs” (junk food binges) that I think was at the root of my overweight status as a kid.

7.     Who are your health gurus? I have several. Deepak Chopra kicked off my love of meditation. He periodically offers free 21-day meditation programs that are a fantastic way to implement or sustain a meditation habit. Dr. Andrew Weil’s book 8 Weeks to Optimum Health was very eye-opening to me. Elian Haan is a mind/body/trauma coach who teaches yoga and tai-chi at an addiction facility. I met her at an SCW Fitness Conference and have learned so much from her about the healing effects of mindfulness and mindful movement. Dr. Walt Willet is one of my favorite nutritionists. I love what I learned in the books, Healthy at 100 by John Robbins, and the China Study by T. Colin Campbell. These books have become guiding lights for me.

8.     What part of your background do you feel had the biggest impact on your life? My dad’s work ethic and the Mediterranean way of living that my grandparents role modeled. My dad is an entrepreneur and a serial hard worker. My dad has been working long hours each day, mostly 7 days a week for over 50 years. Through his example, I learned that hard work pays off. I also learned key business skills that have helped me in my own entrepreneurial journey. My grandparents grew fruit in their yard, and went shopping almost daily for fresh vegetables. There were salads and raw veggies on the table at the beginning of the meal followed by tasty meals that included greens such as spinach and broccoli rabe sautéed in garlic and extra virgin olive oil.

9.     Is there an age limit to creating a healthy lifestyle?

Never. it’s never too late to change your habits. Life is one long learning opportunity. There’s always room for learning and change.

10.  What do you do to relax?

During the times of the Covid shutdowns, meditation has helped me tremendously. My favorite meditation app is Insight Timer. I use it a lot. It has helped me gain focus and improve my productivity, as well as helped me enhance my mood, and deal with stress. I have been working on earning my yoga certification over the last year, and learning new-to-me yoga poses has been invaluable. Two of my favorite poses are corpse pose (also known as shavasana—it’s when you are lying down at the end of a yoga session) or legs up the wall. Legs up the wall is what is sounds like. You are lying down on the floor, and your legs are resting up against a wall. I feel especially relaxed after doing this pose, and that effect lasts for hours.

11.  Are you planning on writing anther book?

Yes, I have a lot of books in me, and will be focusing on the creative process over the next few weeks to get the next book moving along. It’s important to schedule creative days in your calendar. I have a few coming up, and am looking forward to it.

12.  Is there a message you would like to send to your readers? Put the past behind you and make healthy choices going forward. Ruminating about the past can get in your way. Dream about your future, and create a vision of where you want to be, then live in the NOW. Make good choices in the NOW, to achieve your vision of the future

13.  Where can readers find your book? My book, Healthy Dividends: Investments in Nutrition, Movement, and Healthy Habits that Pay Off can be found on Amazon.

14.  Do you have a blog? Yes, my blog can be found at www.triciasilverman.com/blog

Additionally, people can find me on social media at:

www.triciasilverman.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tricia.silverman

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/triciasilverman/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/TriciaSilverman?lang=en

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/tricia-silverman-rd-ldn-mba-b8757811

Bio:

Tricia has been a fitness and nutrition enthusiast, since she was a child. She is a registered and licensed dietitian, certified wellness coach, fitness instructor (certified as a personal trainer and group fitness instructor), and smoking cessation facilitator.She graduated with Summa Cum Laude honors with a Bachelor of Science Degree in Dietetics from the State University of New York and completed her dietetic internship at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. She graduated with honors from the Babson College MBA program.

She has extensive nutrition education experience including time spent as the director of nutrition for the prestigious Canyon Ranch Health Resort in the Berkshires. During her employment at Boston Public Schools, she taught nutrition and was responsible for the operations of over 20 school nutrition meal sites which employed over 100 people. Her vast school nutrition experience also includes three years as the director of food services at Watertown Public Schools where she was responsible for operations and developed and implemented innovative nutrition education opportunities for the students. She has been educating clients and groups through her business for many years.

Lost Words – Describing My Easter Mountain Escape…

March 28, 2016
mandyevebarnett


Jasper Mountains_n

Jasper National Park

apanthropinization                      1880 -1880
withdrawal from human concerns or the human world
His life as a hermit in the woods was characterized by apanthropinization.

desarcinate                                     1656 -1736
to unload; to unburden
She haughtily ordered her butler to desarcinate her baggage from the car.

locupletative                                 1802 -1812
tending to enrich
Your locupletative contributions have helped furnish the new stadium lavishly.

montivagant                                1656 -1658
wandering over hills and mountains
The montivagant hiker crossed the Alps with ease but was stymied by the Andes.

patration                                       1656 -1656
perfection or completion of something
The patration of my dissertation will be an occasion for great merriment.

stagma                                            1681 -1820
any distilled liquor
I will touch neither wine nor stagma, though I do occasionally partake of ale.

More lost words here:
http://phrontistery.info/clw.html

My good friend Linda and I escaped to the mountains for a long weekend over Easter. These words describe our experience to some extent.

We relished the apanthropinization from daily stresses to the Rocky Mountains. The glorious scenery, good company and a splash of stagma enabled us to desarcinate our troubles for a brief respite. Our montivagant and immersion into nature really locupletative our souls. In addition we were able to patration writing projects too. A recharging for our souls and sustenance for our mind and body.

Mediation Circle, Grande Cache

Meditation Circle_n

Finding stillness…

February 14, 2013
mandyevebarnett


 Pandemonium – definition: a wild uproar commotion.

Many of us reside in the pandemonium of work, home and play. Finding stillness amongst this chaos is essential for the  work life balance (might as well use the buzz words here!)  but also so we can connect with our creativity. I have several friends who use meditation and yoga to center themselves, while others use other forms of exercise to clear away the ‘junk’ of every day life. My particular escape is walking, although since my darling canine companion, Twinkle passed away in November, I found it too difficult until very recently.

Twinkle

My walks are not the same without her but time will heal the hurt – hopefully. The few walks I have been on, alone and with my daughter, have been difficult. In the words of said daughter – “This doesn’t feel right.” However, as we walked and talked, remembered and reflected we both felt refreshed to be outside in reasonable temperatures. Alberta is cold in the winter, very cold. We noticed small birds flitting through the bare branches and followed animal footprints in the snow. The only sounds were the breeze, bird song and an occasional sentence. Under a blue sky and slight warmth of the sun we engaged with nature. Life is full of changes we either accept them or engineer a way to alter them so they are easier to manage.

The connection with nature is not just a physically pleasing experience but also an emotional and spiritual one. No matter if you have a particular faith or not – the wonder of the natural world is humbling. Even opening a window can bring you new scents, sounds and sensations – all of them calm your mind and body letting you relax and be open to your spirit.

Palm Springs 068

This is the moment your muse will whisper, a subconscious thought will reveal itself and your ideas will solidify. Take the time to be still – even for a few moments in the pandemonium of your day. Its good for you.

Blackbird (Turdus merula), singing male. Bogen...

Blackbird (Turdus merula), singing male. Bogense havn, Funen, Denmark. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

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