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Author Interview – Tamara Plant

May 7, 2019
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AuthorInterview

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What inspired your latest novel?

Death has been a part of my life since I can remember but I didn’t realize it until two people I loved died within weeks of each other from completely different causes. To that point in my life, I’d lost countless relatives, a boyfriend, my mom, grandmother, grandfather, and father-in-law. Yet, the two losses I experienced in 2017 forced me to examine why I had been surrounded by death. Ultimately, the book is a series of love letters to people who have come in and out of my life, sharing the lessons I’ve learned and how death, love and soulmates are all connected.

How did you come up with the title?            

Originally, the book was going to be called Love, Me since that’s how I sign most of my letters but after sharing the original cover on my Facebook page, a friend suggested I drop the Me and simply call it Love. I initially shrugged off the suggestion until I played around with it and decided that I loved the title so I went with it.

Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

Death isn’t an easy topic to discuss and it’s definitely not an easy experience to go through. The book touches on the spiritual connection before and after death, and how you grief is experienced through the loss of love even if the relationship doesn’t end because of death. Basically, the book is about healing.

How much of the book is realistic?

All of it.

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Are your characters based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

Everything in the book is non-fiction, the people I write about have lived, and the letters are written by people who knew me at certain points in my life.

Where can readers find you on social media and do you have a blog?

Twitter @soulmemos

Instagram @soulconversationswithtamara

Do you have plans or ideas for your next book? Is it a sequel or a stand alone?

My next book is connected to the teachings of Mother Teresa of all people. Anyone who knows me will find this completely baffling considering I am nothing like her but there’s a story connected to why I’m writing it *shrugs* I think it will be pretty good. Totally a stand alone book.

Do you favor one type of genre or do you dabble in more than one?

I’ve focused on non-fiction because I believe sharing your experiences can help others who might feel alone and if I can help one person get through whatever it is they’re going through, I know I’ve succeeded in my life purpose.

Do you plan your stories, or are you a seat of the pants style writer?

I channel write so basically when I’m writing, I sit down and let the words flow.

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What is your best marketing tip?

Don’t pay for advertising. Building an authentic brand is more important than hitting a million followers with white noise social media ads.

Do you find social media a great tool or a hindrance?

I love social media however I filter through the negativity including anything political or the drama of the day. There’s enough toxic bullshit in the world, I don’t need it permeating my online life.

OPTIONAL QUESTIONS

Who is your best supporter/mentor/encourager?

My teenage son, Oscar, is the one person who reads everything I write and is proud of everything I’ve accomplished. We share a special bond and I love knowing that I can bounce ideas off of him or count on him to be the first person cheering me onto the finish line.

Where is your favorite writing space?

The Fairmont Jasper Park Lodge. I can sit in the Emerald Lounge all day and write.

If you could meet one favorite author, who would it be and why?

S.E. Hinton. She wrote the most iconic YA book of all time and I devoured The Outsiders when I was in Grade 7. I tweeted with her once while I was watching the movie. It was a surreal experience.

 

Bio:

Tamara Plant is the author of Forgiveness and Other Stupid Things and Love (because death doesn’t fuck around). Her story has been shared in the #1 International best selling book, Modern Heroine Soul Stories, and a wide variety of online summits, blog posts and video conferences. October 27, 2014 was proclaimed Tamara Plant Day by the City of Edmonton for her work celebrating 212 men and women across Alberta who made a difference through her annual event, the FIERCE awards. She offers workshops on how to understand grief, forgiveness, and soul connections, and can often be found on social media sharing posts about Eminem, angel messages, and wine. Oh, and once she tweeted with S.E. Hinton while watching The Outsiders. It was as amazing as it sounds.

Author Interview – Murray Fuhrer

March 19, 2019
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AuthorInterview

Murray

 1) What inspired your latest novel?

Though I have written children’s novels in the past, most of the writing I do now is non-fiction with a focus on self-esteem and personal empowerment – understanding the origin of self-defeating beliefs and breaking down self-imposed barriers.

2) How did you come up with the title?       

The title Extreme Esteem came from the name of a self-esteem and personal empowerment workshop I had been conducting at the time. My editor, Carl and I came up with the name and after a Google search (with no hits), registered it as the official name for my workshop series. Over the years, the title has become popular and you’ll now see it everywhere. I think I can confidently say that Carl and I were the originators of the term.

3) Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

In my book Extreme Esteem – the Four Factors, I want my readers to understand the origins of dysfunctional thinking and disempowering belief systems, how those systems are reinforced, how they can be broken down and ultimately, replaced with more positive, heart-centred ways of thinking and being.

4) How much of the book is realistic?

Much of the book is realistic. Most of the lessons start with real-life experiences. Some are from my history, but many have been shared with me by workshop participants and clients over the years. I am also an intuitive hypnotherapist and life coach, so I’ve heard many fascinating tales. I should mention, I have always asked permission before sharing an anecdote in my writing.

5) Are your characters based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

Characters are almost always based on people I’ve known or are an amalgam of various people I have met (or heard about) over the years. Sometimes, a character in a story is actually me reacting the way I would to a particular setting or situation.

6) Where can readers find you on social media and do you have a blog?

My readers can find me on Facebook under Extreme Esteem Workshops. They can also read my work on http://www.channillo.com/ and coming soon, http://www.extremeesteem.ca (New website is in the works and will feature blog posts).

7)Do you have plans or ideas for your next book? Is it a sequel or a stand alone?

I am working on a sequel to Extreme Esteem – The Four Factors simply called Extreme Esteem – The Four Factors 2. (Pretty creative, eh?) And I’m working on a time-travel novel titled The Fence Post Philosopher combining down-home philosophy (and self-esteem building) with a science fiction premise.

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8) Of the characters you have created or envisioned, which is your favorite & why?

The favourite character that I created was from a young adult novel I wrote years ago called Power Glide. The character’s name is Verity Lambert. After the death of his father in a vehicle accident, Verity and his mother struggle to make ends meet. Following a brush with the law, Verity is sent to stay with his gentle, long-suffering grandmother and curmudgeonly grandfather for the summer. The two immediately dislike each other, and after a few days on the farm, Verity decides to run away. I won’t give the story away, but it’s a tale of a son who lost his father and a father who lost his son.

9) Do you favor one type of genre or do you dabble in more than one?

I enjoy writing stories that contain a life-lesson and speak to the heart — stories about loss and redemption, forgiveness, the healing journey and achievement despite enormous odds and obstacles. I love people stories – people are fascinating.

10) Do you plan your stories, or are you a seat of the pants style writer? 

It’s weird, I have an idea and will plant a mental “seed” in the fertile soil of my mind. Then I forget about it until I start getting those intuitive nudges that tell me the idea, the seed has germinated, and then I begin to capture everything that comes to mind in a notebook I always carry with me. I try to capture every idea no matter how crazy or absurd because who knows where it might lead or what it might produce.

11) What is your best marketing tip?

As far as a marketing tip, get out there and be seen – be noticed. I used to do a tremendous amount of speaking on the topic of self-esteem and personal empowerment for businesses, schools, colleges and universities and ultimately became known to many as The Self-Esteem Guy. Of course, I would always have my books for sale at every event. For me, it was important to become known for something significant. I once encountered a lady while leaving a restaurant with my family. She recognized me, so approached me and made a life-affirming comment, “You have no idea the difference you’re making in the world and how many lives you’ve touched.”

12) Do you find social media a great tool or a hindrance?

Social media well executed can be tremendously powerful. Poorly executed, it can be a hindrance and even discredit your work. Have a plan and follow it, allowing room for flexibility, innovation and of course, creativity.

OPTIONAL QUESTIONS
What do you enjoy most about writing?
I love words and the endless combination of ways you can put them together to inform, delight, encourage and inspire. I think I realized the power of words years ago when I wrote a story about my grandfather – the first story I sold. I read it to my writers’ group, and a couple of members were crying at the end. Even though they had never met my grandfather, they were moved by his simple, down-home wisdom and saddened by his passing. I feel that writing is my gift, my purpose. When I’m writing, I feel powerful, competent and capable. I feel good.

What age did you start writing stories/poems?
My mother loved to read and shared that love with me. I started dictating stories to her (which she hand wrote in a notebook for me – she had beautiful handwriting) before I could write. I think I must have been four or five years old at the time. I would dictate them; then she would read them back to me so I could make the necessary edits and corrections.

What is your favourite writing space?
I love spending time in my home office surrounded by all my books and childhood chotskies – old toys, old farm signs, plenty of Elvis paraphernalia and old mantle clocks. I collect and repair old clocks, so they’re all over the house, much to the chagrin of my poor wife.

If you could meet one favourite author, who would it be and why?
My favourite author is Rod Serling, creator of The Twilight Zone. I love the way he put thoughts and ideas together in ways (at the time) no-one had considered. Incredibly wise and intelligent, I can read Serling’s stories and words over and over again. I have had the good fortune of getting to know Rod’s daughter, Anne Serling who is an excellent writer.

Bio:

Murray Fuhrer is a professional freelance writer and marketing consultant. Murray spent over 30 years in the broadcast industry, crafting award-winning advertising campaigns for a variety of businesses, large and small. He is a syndicated columnist and author of the popular self-help book Extreme Esteem – The Four Factors.
Murray has written over a million words of advertising copy and sold more than 1000 works to publications across the country. Over the past few years, his focus has broadened to include online advertising, social media marketing, graphic design and video production.

Author Interview – Ellen Notbohm

February 19, 2019
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AuthorInterview

Ellen Notbohm 12 2017

What inspired your latest novel?

Through many years of genealogy work, I’ve learned that every family has that one person—the one nobody will talk about, the one with the aura of taboo around him or her. Three generations back, Analiese Rushton (not her real name) was that person in our family tree.

It took a lot of digging and a grain of luck to find out why—she faced recurring perinatal and postpartum psychosis at a time when neither medicine or society understood it. Given the intense social stigma of mental illness in Annie’s day, aggravated by stark gender bias in both courts of law and courts of public opinion, what we now know to be a bona fide and treatable medical condition threatened to cost Annie nearly everything that matters to most of us—family, home, health, safety, the right to self-determination. I also learned that maternal mental health was the rarest of subjects in historical fiction; it almost felt like publishing too was infected with that zipped-lips taboo. I wanted to tell Annie’s story in a way that would heal ills and injustices, and topple that taboo.

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How did you come up with the title?

That’s a fun chicken-egg question I can’t fully answer. When I started writing, I had a working title that I knew wouldn’t be the final title. One of the things I love about novels is that Aha! moment when you’re reading along and come upon the title of the book. To Kill a Mockingbird and The Color Purple are a couple of potent examples. So as I was writing, I had my “third ear” open, listening for possible titles. I considered several that didn’t feel quite right. Then up popped “The River by Starlight” and there it was. Readers will know from the first page of the book that it’s from a journal entry by Henry David Thoreau. But they have to read some chapters in to find out how it impacts the story and why it’s a thread that carries throughout the book.                                                                         

Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

Although The River by Starlight confronts loss and grief in many shape-shifting forms, it’s not a tale of depth-less terror and tragedy. I would not and could not have written a book like that. Edmonton historian Tony Cashman is a dear friend of mine, and in his testimonial, he described the book as “a story told with deep understanding of the human heart, which won’t abandon hope.” That refusal to abandon hope—Annie’s astonishing resilience and tenacity in the face of devastating events, is a tribute to the luminescence of the human spirit that lives in all of us. That’s why I wrote the book. I didn’t think she should be the one nobody talks about. I wanted her to be the one everybody talks about. 

How much of the book is realistic?

100%. I put in over a decade of research, including six trips to Montana, Edmonton, and North Dakota. Much of the book describes events that did take place, and most of what I made up was also based on that research. I consulted more than 40 libraries and archives, read more than 1,000 homestead accounts, close to 100 books, and several miles of microfilmed newspapers.

Where can readers find you on social media and do you have a blog?

You can find me on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Pinterest, and Instagram. I have two blogs on my website, for fiction and nonfiction. My Facebook page is a very interactive community of readers from more than 40 countries.

Do you have plans or ideas for your next book? Is it a sequel or a stand alone?

I’m percolating an idea based on another long-ago real person, whose early life was a dramatic brew of siblings lost to an epidemic, the Civil War, and historic upheaval within her faith community. She eventually landed in Dayton, Ohio, in the same neighborhood as an interesting pair of brothers who claimed to be building a flying machine. Once I start writing a bit, I’ll know if she wants to tell me her story.

Of the characters you have created or envisioned, which is your favorite & why?

Like the children’s book, I Love You the Purplest, my mother impressed upon me that her children were so different from each other, it meant that each was her favorite in their own way. It’s just that way for my characters in The River by Starlight, many of whom I love, but in ways that defy comparison. Nor do I have a favorite villain, and at least one reader agreed, in what is a favorite comment: “The characters are real and pop off the page. I have empathy, sorrow, joy, and want to choke a number of them!”

Do you favor one type of genre or do you dabble in more than one?

As writers, we’re often told to write what we know, but also told to write what scares us, or write what we want to know. I’d written four nonfiction books and countless essays and advice columns when I decided to write a historical novel. I can’t say enough about how expansive it’s been, in every way, to stretch myself into uncharted territory as a writer. I’m eager to both continue on with what I’m good at, and to push my pencil into forms and genres I haven’t before considered.

Do you plan your stories, or are you a seat of the pants style writer?

Pantser! I’ll start with a spark of an idea and see where the research takes me. When I start writing, the story will either bloom or fall flat. If it blooms, I go on, listening with my “third ear” and following the arc of the story as my research expands. It’s almost like a game where I’m given facts or leads or provocative questions, I work them into the story, then listen for how the characters are going to respond. I’m constantly judging the messages I’m portraying, whether I’m getting it right, and also gauging when it’s necessary for me to take literary license and depart from that.

What is your best marketing tip?

Find what you’re best at and focus on that. It’s good and appropriate to stretch yourself to do things that may be a bit beyond your comfort zone but none of us can be good at everything, let alone have the time or money to do it all. If you really hate, say, a particular social media platform or blogging or podcasts or live events or whatever, be unapologetic about saying no to it. I believe readers pick up on insincerity, so connect them with your best self.

Do you find social media a great tool or a hindrance?

In all things, balance. It’s every author’s choice whether to invest time and effort in a social media presence, but to forego it entirely is to greatly limit your ability to connect with readers and potential readers. Readers expect an internet presence, and other less immediate sources may not come to mind. At the same time, neither is an author obligated to spend untold hours on social media. How much presence, how much effort an author wants to devote to her digital platform is entirely individual, and there’s no “right” amount. I know authors who are only on Facebook, or only on Twitter, and post only when they feel they have something to say. Writers have to prioritize the writing, ruminating, and revising that make us writers in the first place.

What do you enjoy most about writing?

The magic of it. Watching words flow out of a pencil tip, watching words form sentences, sentences form paragraphs, paragraphs form whole stories. Sometimes it’s almost like I’m an observer.

Has your genre changed or stayed the same?

Genre is such a fluid thing to me. Though the writing of my fiction and nonfiction were vastly different experiences, there was enough crossover for me to loosen the boundaries in my mind of what “genre” means. My novel has been recognized with awards for historical fiction, regional fiction, literary fiction. My nonfiction books and historical articles have a strong storytelling element to them. I hope to cross a few more genre thresholds before I’m done.

What genre are you currently reading?

I’m usually reading several books at any given time; right now I’m reading a historical novel, a memoir, a creative nonfiction, and a classic.

Do you read for pleasure or research or both?

They’re inseparable, because research is one of my greatest pleasures. It’s entertaining, informational, emotionally and intellectually challenging. In a way, everything I read is research. It all lodges in my conscious or subconscious and finds its way into my writing in one way or another, either by what I include or what I choose not to include.

 

Where is your favorite writing space?

In my head, of course!

Do you see writing as a career?

Sure, because the definition of “career” is as broad as a writer’s mind allows it to be. I just internet-searched the definition, and the first one that came up was, “an occupation undertaken for a significant period of a person’s life and with opportunities for progress.” Notice it doesn’t mention earning money? I’ve been blessed to have been able to earn a living as a writer, but I know countless writers who’ve been writing and publishing gloriously for years without earning a living. Their work is no less worthy than mine of being called a career. If we read only “career writers” as defined in the conventional sense (money-makers), the breadth and depth of what we read would be far poorer indeed.

Do you nibble as you write? If so what’s your favorite snack food?

When I’m “in the zone,” I have to remember to breathe, let alone eat. Although for a few blissful weeks in the summer, no day is complete until I’ve eaten my weight in blueberries.

What reward do you give yourself for making a deadline?

Making a deadline is its own reward. I’ve high-fived the wall more than a few times in my career.

BIO

An award-winning author in both nonfiction and fiction, Ellen Notbohm’s work has informed, inspired, and guided millions of readers in more than twenty languages. In addition to her acclaimed historical novel The River by Starlight and her globally renowned books on autism and, her articles and columns on such diverse subjects as history, genealogy, baseball, writing and community affairs have appeared in major publications and captured audiences on every continent.

The River by Starlight has been recognized with awards for historical, regional, and literary fiction. Its focus on maternal mental health and gender bias in the early 20th century explores a history rarely addressed in fiction.

Explore Ellen’s work and subscribe to her blogs and newsletter at http://www.ellennotbohm.com.

Connect through social media:

Facebook – Ellen Notbohm, Author

Twitter: @EllenNotbohm

Instagram: Ellen Notbohm

 

Author Interview – Alison Neuman

November 23, 2018
mandyevebarnett


Author-Interview-Button

Alison Neuman Picture

  1. Does writing energize or exhaust you?

Writing is one activity which energizes me. The process of creating characters and the stories in which they interact is an exercise for my imagination.

  1. What is your writing Kryptonite?

Editing is my Kryptonite because as much as I want to start reviewing the characters motivations and the grammar, giving in to the urge in the early stages of my writing process stifles the creativity and overall potential of the final product.

  1. Did you ever consider writing under a pseudonym?

Yes I have considered writing under a pseudonym but as I write in the YA and nonfiction genres,  I didn’t feel a need to have distance or different identity, or anonymity associated between myself and my work.

Ice Rose Cover

  1. Do you want each book to stand alone, or are you trying to build a body of work with connections between each book?

As I experience a disability, it was important that my books always have a character experiencing a disability in them. The disabled characters can be secondary characters but must not represent incorrect disability beliefs and stereotypes.

  1. What was the best money you ever spent as a writer?

The best money I have spent as a writer has been for any books or classes in which have helped me to build my writer’s skill toolkit. There are so many facets to the success of creating and marketing as a writer, that any money spent learning is returned with each completed project.

Searching for Normal A Memoir Cover

  1. How many unpublished and half-finished books do you have?

I currently have one book in which I’m finish the third draft, two which are finished the first draft, one children’s picture book and one YA sequel which are waiting to be written.

Don't Eat Family Front Cover

  1. What does literary success look like to you?

Literary success for myself is when I receive reader feedback about how my books have affected them. While it would be wonderful to be on bestseller lists and be financially sustained from writing only, realistically if I have enough success to continue to write and publish books which find audiences, that is success to me.

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  1. What kind of research do you do, and how long do you spend researching before beginning a book?

Research is a part of the writing process which I complete at the beginning, during and also when my manuscript is completed. In order to build realistic characters and circumstances in which they negotiate, it is important for me to construct a realistic world. That said, I am working on a science fiction book right now and so while the characters are moving around in the real world, human anatomy, ethics, energy and time are areas which need exploring. As much of the one character comes from the future and the mission needed to be completed to save humanity from their own extinction, as much as I can base the fictitious elements from reality should help build legitimacy for my readers.

  1. How many hours a day/week do you write?

The time I spend greatly varies but I am for an hour and a half a week editing and three hours writing or working on activities to grow the manuscript content.

  1. How do you select the names of your characters?

Sometimes I will hear a name that I really like but usually I look on baby name websites for the names and origins to see if they fit with my characters.

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  1. Why did you choose to write in your particular field or genre? If you write more than one, how do you balance them?

The genres in which I write are Young Adult, Memoir, and Plays. Usually my writing projects become the one in which draws me to write. I chose YA because I wanted to write the books I was searching for when I was the age of the audience. Memoir was because I had read several and found I had something I wanted to share that was the truth as I remember it. Plays are because I love theatre and found limited opportunities for persons experiencing a disability to act or have a voice in the theatre community. When in the creation process, the genre in which the story can best be told balances which area I write and work in. As for balance, the project which I am most eager and energized to write is the one I select.

  1. How long have you been writing?

I started writing poetry, lyrics and screen plays when I was in my teens. Writing manuscripts with the intention of publishing has been only in the past few years. I still consider myself as an emerging writer as I fell there is so much for me learning to be a lifelong experience.

  1. What inspires you?

Life is my inspiration. Sounds weird but being in the world and interacting with people provides me sparks of interest which act as a jumping board for creation of my stories and characters.

  1. How do you find or make time to write?
    Just like with most activities, I have to schedule in the time to write to ensure that there is a  space and time where I’m able to do so.

 

  1. What projects are you working on at the present?

In the draft stages of my sci-fi book.

  1. What do your plans for future projects include?

My future plans include brainstorming and writing the next children’s picture book in my friends and family series.

  1. Share a link to your author website.

www.alisonneuman.ca

Facebook

https://www.facebook.com/alisonneuman.ca/

Twitter

https://twitter.com/crossingts

Bio

Alison Neuman lives in Alberta, Canada, where she works as a freelance writer. Her debut novel Ice Rose: A Young Adult Spy Novel, a YA book integrating her love of gadgetry with the broad imaginative license afforded by the secret agent genre, features a female protagonist in a wheelchair and was published in 2010 by Fireside Publications.

Alison’s work has appeared in MacEwan Today, Westword, and the Edmonton Journal, and on three tracks of the CD release, Outside the Window.

Alison was honoured in 2011 for her human rights work in advocating for the rights of persons experiencing disabilities and in 2013 she won the Glenrose Courage Award. One of her greatest achievements was the founding of Camp Mission Access, an integrative camp for children from all walks of life—both with and without disabilities. Her memoir, Searching for Normal, was released in 2013, and a musical of the same debuted in the Edmonton International Fringe Theatre Festival in 2014. Don’t Eat Family and Help From Friends, in her children’s Friends and Family series were published through Dream Write Publications.

Her play, The Sunset Syndrome was selected for Walterdale Theatre’s 2016 “From Cradle to Stage New Works Festival” and produced in the Edmonton International Fringe Theatre Festival in 2017. Don’t Eat Family and Help From Friends, in her children’s Friends and Family series were published through Dream Write Publishing.

Alison is currently working towards her Master of Arts in Integrated Studies through Athabasca University.

 

 

Author Interview – Phyllis H Moore

August 24, 2018
mandyevebarnett


Author-Interview-Button

Phyllis Moore

Please welcome Phyllis – as you can see she is a prolific author!

  1. Does writing energize or exhaust you?

Writing energizes me. It’s all I really want to do. Once I sit down and start, I don’t want to stop. It’s what I think about when I’m doing other things. Characters talk to me while I’m moving the clothes from the washer to the dryer or unloading the dishwasher.

  1. What is your writing Kryptonite?

My characters drive me. Once I have their name down on paper, these people and animals lead the way. Sometimes they do things I didn’t anticipate, and they are always right.

  1. Did you ever consider writing under a pseudonym?

I briefly considered a pseudonym, but decided against it. My thoughts were, I wanted readers to know me personally and I didn’t think that would be possible if I didn’t use my name.

  1. What other authors are you friends with, and how do they help you become a better writer?

I have virtual writer friends and a few mentors. Social media groups are the place I get the most assistance. I have found other writers to be a generous lot, willing to share their failures and expertise.

  1. Do you want each book to stand alone, or are you trying to build a body of work with connections between each book?

Currently I have a series of books that could stand alone, but they are based on the same coming of age of the main character, Sabine. The four book series follows her from age four, living in severe neglect with her mentally ill, alcoholic mother, to the age of sixteen. These were the first books I wrote. I only intended to write about Sabine as a child, but I couldn’t stop. I have five other stand alone novels, a pair of middle grade books, an anthology of short stories (a little spooky), and a non-fiction book on retirement. I have learned I am a story teller first and my stories are not always related, so I have no desire for my books to be tied to each other.

Sabine

  1. What was the best money you ever spent as a writer?

First, I would say editing is the best money spent and second is the money I’ve spent on BookBub promotional deals. I say this because the BookBub deals have garnered reviews.

  1. What was an early experience where you learned that language had power?

My paternal grandparents used to tell me stories and read to me. I remember picturing images from their words. I could literally see the fairies and beasts in their stories. I think that was my earliest experience, the knowledge I could see what they spoke.

  1. What’s your favorite under-appreciated novel?

I like historical fiction, and I think my favorite was Cleopatra, by Stacy Shiff. I could visualize the palaces, her clothing, the ships, everything described. It takes me back to the time and place.

  1. As a writer, what would you choose as your mascot/avatar/spirit animal?

A dog would be my spirit animal. All of my characters have pets. Many of them communicate with their pets. I think we all do that to a certain extent, but my very first character, Sabine, was psychic. Her dog, Auggie, was her only confidant. When Sabine missed human cues, Auggie could help her. For me, that was a metaphor of what we take for granted with animals every day.

  1. How many unpublished and half-finished books do you have?

One book unfinished. I have a rough draft and a few rereads. I hope to get it to the editor in February to publish in late spring. I have a cover and the title is Birdie & Jude.

  1. What does literary success look like to you?

Success for me would be people reading my books and enjoying the story. I hope readers can take away something they can apply to their own lives. I love it when readers say they feel like they know my characters or can identify with a place. When I hear that I know I did a good job.

  1. What kind of research do you do, and how long do you spend researching before beginning a book?

Characters inspire my stories, so I get to know them first. If they take me to a time I’m not familiar with, I do some research on what appliances, vehicles, clothing, etc. were common. Often, the book is set in a time I’m familiar with. My novel, And the Day Came, was set in the 1930’s, so I read about the history of some of the families in the story. It is historical fiction based on the childhood of my mother-in-law. There were other books written about the family, so I took some time to read those. That was the most time consuming research I’ve done.

And the Day Came

  1. How many hours a day/week do you write?

I write most of the day and sometimes late into the night. I would say I write about 6 to 8 hours/day. Sometimes my time is blurred between writing and promotion. I spend a lot of time on the computer doing blogs, newsletters, submitting short stories, etc.

  1. How do you select the names of your characters?

Selecting names is a challenge. I have to admit I gravitate toward short names, so I don’t have to type so many letters when I’m writing the story. One of my editors criticized a name choice once, but I refused to change it. The young girl’s name was Beatrice. She was a minor character. I live in south Texas. Growing up, I had many Latina friends. Some of my best friends were Veronica, Beatrice, Norma Linda, Mary Helen, etc. The book, The Bright Shawl, begins in San Antonio and ends in Galveston. It would have been perfectly normal for a female to be names Beatrice. However, if she had been the main character, I might have given her the nickname, Bea. I like Pinterest and pin many inspirations there for my books. I have a board for every book. If I’m looking for a name, I do a search on Pinterest. There are wonderful categories, Bohemian, Hollywood, Biblical, etc. Pinterest is a great source for names for humans and animals. I used Pinterest to name the horses in Secrets of Dunn House.

The Bright Shawl

Secrets of Dunn House

  1. What was your hardest scene to write?

I had to think about this one. I think transition scenes where there is not much emotion or description. It’s hard to come up with a new way to describe the mundane. I don’t do romance, so that would probably be hard for me to write.

  1. Why did you choose to write in your particular field or genre?  If you write more than one, how do you balance them?

My experience, my age, and my characters dictate my genre. I wrote first and then decided on the genre. I lean toward southern gothic, but the more I write, the more I think my books are generally Women’s Fiction. I’m aware I’m not the traditionally branded author where all of my books are linked by an atmosphere, font, cover, etc. They reflect me and the issues that concern me at the time. As I learn more, I try to do a better job of branding those things and one of these days I may have a more professional look. I have done some do-overs to tie things together. It does look better on the shelf. I’m a work in progress.

  1. How long have you been writing?

I have been writing all my life, but not stories or books. I didn’t start trying to market what I wrote until about six years ago.

  1. What inspires you? 

I like to people watch and I always find things to apply to my characters. This past August, we had a hurricane in Texas, Harvey. Some of the situations I watched on television and read about in the newspaper inspired the story in Birdie & Jude. I started thinking about people who get stranded due to unpredictable circumstances and meet other people they become attached to. It’s not a literal story, but a “what if” that I think about in those types of situations. I have been through a few hurricanes, so the details were easy for me to get in touch with. It’s interesting when I look back at other stories to see how much weather inspires me. My short story, Audrey and the Summer of Storms was inspired by spending summers in the Texas panhandle with my grandparents. They had to deal with tornadoes. There was a summer when I returned from several trips to the storm shelter in Quanah to my home near Corpus Christi to face Hurricane Carla. I can find inspiration in most anything. Houses, food, fabrics, animals, travel, illness. It’s never ending.

Audrey

  1. How do you find or make time to write?

I’m lucky because I’m old enough to be retired. Because I’m old, I have many life experiences to draw on and lots of time to think about them. My normal routine is to write most of the day after I’ve finished my few chores. During holidays, I get a little resentful that there are other demands on my time. Writing is my priority and I’m lucky to be able to do it most of the time.

  1. What projects are you working on at the present?

My current project is Birdie & Jude. As I said it was inspired by Hurricane Harvey, but it’s also about the relationship that grows between two women from very different backgrounds. They connect because of their differences, but also because they have the same insecurities and desires. One rejects her family and social status, while the other longs for family and a stable home and friends. One is elderly and healthy as a horse and the other is young a medically fragile. However, as in real life, there is a spirit that unites them and it’s not what they might guess.

  1. What do your plans for future projects include?

I would like to begin writing something to release around the holidays, 2018. I love a good holiday story. Opal’s Story, my best-selling novel. Culminates in a Thanksgiving celebration. Josephine’s Journals takes place during preparations for a holiday open house. I like to decorate using the accoutrements in my imagination. They are free, after all, and I can rummage around in someone else’s attic and polish the silver without getting my hands dirty. I can also order someone else to do it if I’m that character. I can be sweet, or a real “you know what”. It’s the most fun, like playing house and mud pies.

Opal's Story

Josephine

  1. Share a link to your author website. http://www.phyllishmoore.com

https://www.Amazon.com/author/phyllishmoore

Phyllis H. Moore wants to live life experiences more than once: doing it, writing about it and reading about it. She’s had two careers and two retirements. Both careers gave her inspiration for her novels: The Sabine Trilogy, Sabine, Josephine’s Journals and Secrets of Dunn House, Opal’s Story, Tangled, a Southern Gothic Yarn, and The Bright Shawl, Colors of Tender Whispers, and an anthology of spooky short stories inspired by real places and events, The Bridge on Jackson Road. She has authored one nonfiction book, Retirement, Now What? Phyllis has been published by Caffeinated Press in the anthology, Brewed Awakenings 2, Fifteen Tales to Jolt Your Mind Awake. She blogs on her web site http://www.phyllishmoore.com. Follow her on Pinterest and Facebook.

Billy's StoryTangledJackson Roadretirement

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Phyllis is a retired social worker and former owner/operator of a small bed and breakfast. She’s lived in the rural areas and cities of south Texas. She currently lives on Galveston Island with her husband, Richard.

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