Tag Archives: non-fiction

Genres of Literature – Graphic Novels


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The definition of a graphic novel is a book made up of comics content. However, the term is not strictly defined, though Merriam-Webster’s dictionary definition is “a fictional story that is presented in comic-strip format and published as a book”, while its simplest definition is given as “cartoon drawings that tell a story and are published as a book”

Obviously, some will say these are not ‘novels’ in the traditional sense at all. One such author, Alan Moore believed: “It’s a marketing term…that I never had any sympathy with. The term ‘comic’ does just as well for me…The problem is that ‘graphic novel’ just came to mean ‘expensive comic book’ and so what you’d get is people like DC Comics or Marvel Comics – because ‘graphic novels’ were getting some attention, they’d stick six issues under a glossy cover and called it graphic novel under the action hero’s name.

However, the term ‘graphic novel’ is broadly applied to include non-fiction, anthologized and fiction works and is distinguished from the term ‘comic book’, as this refers to comic periodicals. 

Richard Kyle, a fan historian coined the term ‘graphic novel’ in 1964 and the term gained popularity in the comic community from 1978 and especially with the start of the Marvel graphic novel line in 1982. The book industry began using ‘graphic novel’ as a book shelf category in 2001. Most comics historians agree that the first real ‘graphic novel’ was Will Eisner’s A Contract With God and Other Tenement Stories published in 1978. Decidedly adult in its images, themes, and language, Eisner’s book spoke to the generation that had first grown up with superhero comics in the 1940’s and 1950’s.

I found a fascinating link regarding the history of graphic novels. Take a look: http://libguides.marymede.vic.edu.au/graphic_novels/history

 

Author Interview – Lorna Schultz Nicholson


Author-Interview-Button

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  1. Does writing energize or exhaust you?

In all honesty, it does a bit of both.  I get so energized from the thinking, creating and writing.  But the mind is a funny thing and once I/we (my editor and me) are down to the nitty-gritty edits, it starts shifting towards my next project.  Ideas start popping up and I have to hold them down. This is often the time when I also wake up in the night and think…I made a mistake and then I lose sleep over that one mistake.  Often I get up in the night and make the change, then I can’t go back to sleep.  Does this make any sense?

But writing does give me charge.

2. What is your writing Kryptonite?   I want to say my dog because he is always wanting to go for walks but then when I walk I get energized and my mind frees a bit and thoughts come through.  So that isn’t really true and I don’t want to blame him anyway, he’s too good a dog.  Well sometimes.  I know that coffee and chocolate are my reverse Kryptonite’s.  Maybe being with friends?

3. Did you ever consider writing under a pseudonym?

I haven’t really thought about that.  Right now there is no need for me to do that.

4. What other authors are you friends with, and how do they help you become a better writer?

I have tons of author friends.  I dog walk with Karen Spafford-Fitz and Debby Waldman and I eat dessert or talk about eating dessert with Natasha Deen.  I get together with Sharon Jennings, Karen Bass and so many others when I’m in Toronto.  They all help me because they write such amazing books and reading their books makes me better.  And talking about plot problems, character problems or even publishing problems is really helpful. 

5. Do you want each book to stand alone, or are you trying to build a body of work with connections between each book?

I have done both.  I have written series. In fact the 4th book in my One-2-One series has just been released and all the characters are connected through their high school Best Buddies group.  But I have also written stand-alones and have one pitched as I’m writing this.  No confirmation but it is pitched.  I also take on the odd non-fiction project.  I’m currently writing a 40th anniversary Oilers book which has been a huge project as I interviewed so many people.  Just different work. 

6. What was the best money you ever spent as a writer?

Years ago, I took a trip to the NWT and I paid out of my pocket but it was such a great trip and gave me insight into my characters and their landscape.  I went to Inuvik and Tuktoyaktuk and it has stayed with me.  Years later I went back to the NWT with the TD book tour and loved it all over again.

7. What was an early experience where you learned that language had power?

I loved to read as a child and my mother really encouraged us to read.  I remember reading Anne of Green Gables and I loved Anne so much. The scene with Matthew and the puffed sleeves has stayed with me for years.  I also loved Trixie Beldon and wanted to be in the Bob Whites of the Glen.

8. What’s your favorite under-appreciated novel?

That is a super hard question because I don’t think any novel is under appreciated but I know what you are asking.  You know, I can’t answer this question if I’m honest.  I’m thinking and thinking and to me all the books I’ve read and loved are appreciated by me.  It’s a hard business and sometimes as a writer you wonder why your book doesn’t get this or that, why you don’t get foreign sales or front spots in Chapters, then you get an email from a reader who tells you how much it meant to them.  That means it was appreciated.

9. As a writer, what would you choose as your mascot/avatar/spirit animal?

Wow, you ask really amazing questions.   But they are hard.  I’ve never thought about this but once I went to a shaman and he said perhaps I was a deer in a past life.  So maybe a deer.  Because sometimes I need to slow my work down, and fill the holes.  I’m a fast worker and I like to get to the end so it would be helpful to slow down every now and again BUT deer can get moving too when they have to and can they jump! 

10. How many unpublished and half-finished books do you have?

Tons.  I have a few adult mysteries, an early reader, a middle grade reader and a couple of teen novels.  Boo hoo.  No one wanted them.  Oh, and I have a one-act play and a screenplay.

11. What does literary success look like to you?

This is something that keeps changing as I raise the bar for myself.  At first it was to get published. Then it was to get a second book published.  Then it was to try a non-fiction and a teen novel.  Now I want to maybe do a teen thriller, something completely different.  I would also love some foreign sales.  BUT…all that aside, what is important to literary success is the reader telling you they read your book and got something from your story.  I think in the end that will be my definition of literary success. 

12. What kind of research do you do, and how long do you spend researching before beginning a book?

I do a lot of research.  How long I spend depends on the book and what I know or don’t know about the subject matter.  I can research for months before starting a novel. 

13. How many hours a day/week do you write?

This really depends on my travel schedule.  I travel a lot, and do a lot of author visits to schools and sometimes this disrupts the writing.  When I’m home, at my desk, I can work 4-5 hours on a new project before I have to answer emails and questions like I’m doing now.  Lol. 

14. How do you select the names of your characters?

Names just come to me.  Although once I wrote an entire novel knowing I didn’t like the one character’s name and when I finished it and was doing my second draft I changed it.  And the name worked. 

15. What was your hardest scene to write?

I wrote a bullying scene in a novel titled Born With (One-2-One series) and it was hard to write because I know that it was mimicking reality and that made me sad.  My character getting bullied was gay.

16. Why did you choose to write in your particular field or genre?  If you write more than one, how do you balance them?

I write in many different genres because I’m always trying to improve my writing and challenge myself.  For instance, I’m writing this Oilers project which is non-fiction and I’m almost nearing the end – woo hoo- and I can’t wait to write a middle grade novel I signed a contract with Orca.  Did I tell you I can’t wait to go back to fiction???  So exciting. 

17. How long have you been writing?

Since I was little.  I took a break in high school to play sports and be a jock and in university to get a science degree.  But I did write a lot when I was young.

18. What inspires you?  

Everything and anything.  My mother wrote poetry and loved books so she is a huge inspiration to me.

19. How do you find or make time to write?

I don’t believe in writer’s block.  I call it procrastination.  I just make time to write because I can’t not write.  Even when I wasn’t published and was getting rejected and wanted to quit.  I just couldn’t not write.

20. What projects are you working on at the present?

I have my non-fiction Oilers book which will come out in the fall, and I’m currently doing photo captions for.  I will go back to my work as soon as I finish this questionnaire.  (Nice break.)  And I just had a teen novel A Time To Run: Stuart and Sam be launched, so I should do some media stuff and get my website updated.  I have a middle grade I’m going to write for Orca Currents in the spring and another hockey book in my Amazing Hockey Series.  

21. What do your plans for future projects include?

Not sure.  I’ve pitched a couple of teen novels and I’m playing around with a teen thriller.  Not sure where it will go.  It’s fun sometimes to play around. 

22. Share a link to your author website.

www.lornaschultznicholson.com  

lornasn on Instagram

Lorna Schultz Nicholson on facebook

Lornasn on twitter

Bio:  

 

Lorna Schultz Nicholson has published over thirty-six books, including picture books, middle grade fiction and non-fiction, adult non-fiction and YA fiction. (She is currently working on a 40th Anniversary Edmonton Oilers book.)  Many of her books have made the CCBC Best Books list, been Resource Links picks and been nominated for awards.  Her children’s books are about kids and their diversities and friendships and school and family life and emotions and feelings and… the ups and downs in life.  We all have those ups and downs, and we’re all different, which makes us all special.  Lorna lives in Edmonton with her hubbie and two dogs, a whiny Bichon Shih Tzu, and a naughty, hyper puppy she rescued from Mexico.   Well, he’s not a puppy anymore but she treats him like he is.  Over the years she has been a television co-host and reporter, radio host and reporter, theatre and murder mystery actor, fitness coordinator and rowing coach.  Now she is full-time writer. She travels to schools all across Canada to inspire children about her love of reading and writing, and she loves talking to adults about writing, and leading writing workshops.  She remembers her before-published days and wants to encourage writers to keep pursuing their dreams.  Being an author is a dream come true. 

 

Interview Brian Hayden – An Experience of Holding onto Life…


Brian Hayden

What inspired you to write your first book?

My first Book, “Understanding Strategic And Tactical Planning” was a surprise. I was the Chief Operating Officer for Specialty, 24 hour and Emergency Animal Hospitals for a national Animal hospital company. I wrote some notes, intended to help our hospital managers understand the process of operating animal hospitals. The American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA) saw it. They asked me to expand it into a book.

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The next two books dealt with my death. “Death: Living To Talk About It” started out as a blog. I had just come out of hospice, where I was supposed to have died. I began a blog – the sole purpose was try to understand the ordeal I went through.

Tell us a little about yourself before your experience.

I am happily married, with two grown children. I have six grandsons. Before the problems began, I was an Air Force Master Sargent, stationed in England. I was 35 years old when I first died.

What were your ‘belief’s on life after death at that time (if any)?

I hadn’t really thought about life after death. Just the usual passing thought now and then. That changed when I was in hospice, waiting to die.

I was visited by both of my grandmothers. They had passed many years before.  Though I was drugged and dying, years of reflection bring me to one conclusion. My grandmothers were with me – watching and waiting. I talk about this in detail, in am upcoming book.

book cover

How did you come up with the title?

The title of my first post death experience book came easily. “Death: Living To Talk About It”. Having died  (actually died) 5 times and had “should have died” moments more than 200 times – well, the title just presented itself.

Is this your first book?

This was not my first book. The management book I mentioned earlier was my first book. During that period, I had written several scripts for education videos.

Why did you decide to write about your experience?

At first, I wanted to write about my experiences to help me understand what had happened to me. Later, the motivation shifted. As the blog was progressing, I received feedback from many people. They appreciated me sharing my story. It was informational, and it let people know that they are not alone. Lots of people struggle with serious health issues. They were comforted knowing others were experiencing the same things they were.

What message do you want to send to your readers?

Hope. It’s a powerful word. When you read my books, you understand the adversity and struggles I had for many years. Never give up. Think to yourself: If he can still be skulking about after all that he has gone through, maybe then I can too.

Road to Transplant

How many books have you written (published or unpublished)?

“Road To Transplant” is the sequel to the “Death” book. It is an international bestselling book that chronicles my journey for life. Great information. It examines family dynamics during family crisis, looks into the process of getting a heart transplant, and follows me through the process of dying – not knowing if a heart would become available.

I’ve also written a book. “Five Short Stories and Twelve Poems”. I desperately needed a diversion from talking about illness. It is a fun book. The stories will make you laugh, cry, be happy and sad.

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What book are you reading now?

I am re-reading “A Movable Feast” by Hemmingway. His words stir the creative juices in my mind. I always read him, and the Russian writers of the 18th and 19th century as I write my own stories.

Can you tell us about your upcoming book?

I have a second book of short stories and poems in the works. Also a historical fiction is almost completed. Both books should be available in about a year.

How do we find your books, blog and bio?

Everything you never knew you wanted to know about me is on my web page. Along with excerpts from my books, reviews and links to purchase them. Also, you will find a great blog that nearly a half million people have read.

Go to Brianhayden.net for all stuff ME!

Thanks for taking a moment out of your day to know more about me, and my work.

Brian has also made videos on the dangers of smoking. See below.

 

 

Welcome back Paul W Papa – A Second Interview…


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What inspired you to write your first book?

I have always been fascinated with history and with Las Vegas, combining the two seemed like the natural thing to do with It Happened in Las Vegas.

IHI LV HIRES

How did you come up with the title?

The publisher came up with the title actually. My first book is part of a series called “It Happened In…”

Is this your first book? How many books have you written (published or unpublished)?

My latest book Discovering Vintage Las Vegas is my fourth book, all of which have been published by Globe Pequot Press. This was by far my favorite one to write as it celebrates all those great places that have been in Las Vegas for 20, 30, 40, and even 50 years—quite an accomplishment for a town that blows up its past like most people change their shoes. This book tells their stories and invites the reader to visit each place on their own. Additionally, there are shout outs of vintage spots that each contains a short but interesting tidbit.

DiscoverVintageLasVegas

Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

Yes. It’s important to treasure the past as you move forward.

How much of the book is realistic?

It’s non-fiction, so all of it. One of my favorite places is a gorgeous chapel right on the Las Vegas strip that got its funding from a notorious mobster.

Are your characters based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

There are no characters in this book. However, there are plenty of people and they are all very real.

If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

Yes. I would’ve liked to include a story on Ralph Jones Display. It’s a great spot where Christmas is celebrated all year round. I didn’t think of it until after I already wrote the book, but I did manage to give the place a vintage spot shout out.

Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

I want them to understand that history doesn’t have to be boring. We all remember sitting around the campfire enthralled by some great storyteller. That’s what I want history to be—a great tale that you can’t break yourself away from.

What is your favorite part/chapter of your book/project?

I don’t really have a favorite chapter. Each story was a little adventure on its own and I enjoyed following each one to its conclusion—receiving a unique reward each time.

What is your favorite theme/genre to write?

History: or more specifically, the story of people. I find people fascinating and I have learned that each and every one of us has our own little story. My goal is to capture as many of those stories as I possibly can.

Is there one subject you would never write about as an author? What is it?

I’m not into satanic things or the occult—though I have written a book about haunting in Las Vegas (Haunted Las Vegas). That’s not a road I feel comfortable walking too far down.

Haunted LV HIRES

What book are you reading now?

I’m always reading books on my craft—learning how to tell stories the best way I can. For relaxing reading I can usually be found with my nose in Lawrence Sanders’ McNally series or following Tom Dorsey’s lovable serial killer (I know—but it’s not what you thing) and Florida historian Serge.

Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?

Yes, Gretchen Archer and LynnDee Walker, both mystery authors. If you have not checked out these two women, you are missing something indeed.

Do you see writing as a career?

Oh yeah, a hard career, but a very enjoyable one. Hard only because what they don’t tell you at author school is that you can write the greatest book ever written, but if you don’t know how to get that book into the hands of readers, you’re wasting your time. Authors need to know not just how to write, but also how to embrace that evil word “marketing.”

Where do you see yourself in ten years?

Key West Florida…oh, you meant as a career didn’t you? I see myself with several books on the bestseller list, doing what I love—capturing people’s tales and ensuring their stories are not forgotten.

Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

Making sure I honor the people I write about. Those people entrust their stories to me and I feel a strong weight on my shoulders to do them justice.

Have you ever hated something you wrote?

Yes, but only after it was published. Okay, here it is…my first book has so many mistakes in it I’m embarrassed to call it mine. I wrote the book too quick and didn’t spend enough time proofreading. When you get dates wrong, you lose your credibility and once that’s gone you can’t get it back. I learned a valuable lesson not to skip the proof-reading step. You can tell a great story, but if you say that story happened in 2003 when it really happened in 1993, you’ve cheated your audience—the people who have trusted you with their time and money.

What book do you wish you had written?

The Art of Driving in the Rain, probably one of the best books I’ve ever read.

What is your best marketing tip?

If you Indie publish, learn as much as you can about key words. Don’t think of it as marketing, put yourself in the role of the reader and think “how would I find this book if I were looking for it,” then make sure you book comes up on those searches.

What genre is your next project? What is it about?

Non-fiction. I’m writing a book about bike trails in and around Las Vegas. I’m an avid bike rider and this is my first guide book. It’s been fun and challenging…and I’m always up for a new challenge.

Can you tell us about your upcoming book?

Sure, it’s a guide to 35 bike trails in and around Las Vegas. Some trails are for mountain bikes, some for road bikes, and some for urban bikes.  The book contains mile-by-mile instructions, as well as maps and cool things to do in the area.

Best Bike Rides of Las Vegas Cover

How do we find your books, blog and bio?

I can be found here:

Amazon Author’s Page: amazon.com/author/paulwpapa.americanstoryteller

Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/PaulWPapa?ref=hl

GoodReads Author Page: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/3172096.Paul_W_Papa

In addition, I have a website: www.paulwpap.com. I have a blog on the site, but it is kind of under construction, but keep checking back, I have a very exciting project in the works and should be revealing it shortly.

Here is a link to Paul’s previous interview in 2013 -https://mandyevebarnett.com/2013/04/07/interview-with-paul-w-papa/

You can see he has been extremely busy writing! Thank you for joining us Paul.

Do You Abide by the Rules..?


Abide – definition: 1) to remain; continue; stay 2) to put up with; tolerate 3) to accept without opposition or question.

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We all know there are ‘rules’ to writing, whether it is fiction, non-fiction or other modes of the written word. I had an interesting conversation last night at my novel workshop regarding how we are taught writing in school. One participant in our group is a teacher and she is in the midst of editing her first manuscript. During the discussions she told us that the writing style taught to students is very different to that of creative writing. She is re-learning how to write!

Unfortunately, there is no distinction made between the different styles of writing in schools. So an essay, an article and a story will all be written in the same way. As we know this isn’t correct and thereby lies the problem. A young writer may happily write story after story thinking they have the correct structure but it isn’t until their work is reviewed, that they learn the error.

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Is this a fault of the system? Or is it a matter of ‘one fits all’? Is it a matter of available classroom time to teach all the styles ? 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I follow Kristin King – http://kristinkingauthor.wordpress.com/ and she has several writing rules posts that I am sharing here:

http://kristinkingauthor.wordpress.com/2013/05/16/writing-rules-we-could-do-without/

http://kristinkingauthor.wordpress.com/2013/05/22/george-orwells-rules-for-writing/

http://kristinkingauthor.wordpress.com/2013/03/27/rules-of-writing-elmore-leonard/