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Author Interview – Kathrin Hutson

April 16, 2019
mandyevebarnett


AuthorInterview

Kathrin

What inspired your latest novel?

  • Sleepwater Beat was a combination of so many different things, it’s hard to pinpoint exactly where the inspiration came from. I’ve always loved the Latin idiom Stilus est superior gladio: The pen is mightier than the sword (it’s tattooed in Latin on my arm, after all). Really, Sleepwater Beat arose as the product of my imagination running away with what might happen if that were literally true—where words were literally more powerful than the sword, or bullets, or any modern physical weapon.

How did you come up with the title?

  • Originally, “Sleepwater” was supposed to be the name of a river. I never planned for this to become a novel. Sleepwater Beat was originally written as an experimental short story, where all the scenes were completely out of chronological order and had no rhyme or reason to how I ordered them (I literally made a bulleted outline of scenes, cut each one into a different strip, and basically drew the next one out of a hat). That short story experiment failed; it wasn’t nearly as effective as I’d hoped it would be in just over 30,000 words. But then I realized this thing really needed to be a novel instead. So, in that original short story, Sleepwater was the name of a river where Leo killed a man she was ordered to “dispose of”. As it turns out, that was one of the scenes in the short story that never made it into the novel. So then Sleepwater became the name of the underground organization of people who all have powers like Leo’s.

“Beat” in this title came as a sort of play on words. “Beat” as in “a metrical or rhythmic stress in poetry or music or the rhythmic effect of these stresses” – which refers to the rhythmic and metrical use of language by the main character Leo and the people in Sleepwater, all who can illicit physical responses in people just by using certain types of words. Then there’s “beat” as in “a regularly traversed round” (like a cop patrolling her beat, as the police definitely come into play in this book), and with the definition of “a group of news sources that a reporter covers regularly” (as evidenced in all the news reports peppered throughout Part 1 of the book). There’s a lot of play on words here. I think there has to be, when words become the most powerful weapon in a near-future dystonia not far off from our own future… maybe minus the genetic mutations. Who knows?           

Sleepwater Beat Ebook Cover                                                   

Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

  • I think the main message here is that everybody, no matter who we are or where we came from, is looking for a place to belong. Leo’s had a hard life, and by necessity, she build incredibly high, strong walls around herself as a person. She has to discover the kind of person she wants to be when faced with the opportunity to live and become a part of something bigger instead of merely fighting to survive one day after the next. There’s a more subtle message in here too (though maybe not too subtle, because I think it runs through all of my books) that the poor choices and large mistakes a person may have made in the past doesn’t define who they are, nor does it eradicate any possibility of redemption. We chose who we want to be moving forward, as long as we can forgive ourselves first and foremost.

 How much of the book is realistic?

  • I’d like to think everything in this book is realistic; that’s one of the most important elements of fiction in the first place, right? Really, the only thing that isn’t completely realistic is the superhero-type power found in Leo and the other members of Sleepwater. At least for now. A lot of what these people endure and discover through the story is left up to interpretation—whether or not these abilities stemmed from natural evolution or genetic engineering/experimentation. I like to think even “the beat” is a realistic possibility, as well as the few things that render it ineffective. One of the creepiest things that happened when I was finishing the first draft of this book was brought to my attention by one of my writing friends and alpha readers. He’d found a story of a new “high-intensity focus” drug, reported to do more for “clean energy and focus” than anything else out on the market. I can’t for the life of me remember what that was, probably because it was too close to home and what I was writing about the medication Pointera in Sleepwater Beat at the time. How strange to see the dystopian world I was building so closely reflected in almost real time by our own reality in science and pharmaceuticals right now. I definitely got goosebumps.

 Are your characters based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

  • Sleepwater Beat is actually the closest of all my six books to my own life and my own experiences. I’ve written more of myself into Leo than into any other character I’ve ever created, and it was honesty pretty scary to keep moving forward with it. Some scenes felt like a confession for me. Some of them felt like nostalgic recollection. Some of them were cathartic or merely a walk down memory lane. The really terrifying part was the idea that all of that would have been nauseatingly obvious to the reader. So far, I don’t think that’s the case. So this is a prime example of “writing what you know”, though of course I don’t actually have the ability to make people believe absolutely whatever I tell them. Not yet.

 Where can readers find you on social media and do you have a blog?

  • I’m definitely active on social media: facebook.com/kathrinhutsonfiction, Instagram @kathrinhutsonfiction, and Twitter @KLHCreateWorks. As much as I can, I do live Facebook videos every Wednesday morning. And my main newsletter goes out the second Thursday of every month. All my subscribers get some pretty sweet access to behind-the-scenes stuff with my writing and current stories, plus all my huge announcements and good news goes out to my subscribed readers first. I don’t have a consistent blog currently, with all the writing and marketing and everything else I’m doing. But my monthly newsletter (plus all the extra fun tidbits every week) is jam packed with most of what I’d blog about anyway. And anyone can join my newsletter right here: https://klhcreateworks.activehosted.com/f/29

Do you have plans or ideas for your next book? Is it a sequel or a stand alone?

  • Absolutely! Right now, I’m working on my newest Dark Fantasy trilogy, Vessel Broken. Book One, Imlach Fractured, will be out September 2019, and the other two books planned for the series (plus a prequel with the Playing with Fire boxed set in October 2019) will follow in the beginning of 2020. After that, I’ll be returning to the Blue Helix series. Just like Sleepwater Beat, all the other Blue Helix books will also be standalones, set in the same world and following the stories of these characters in Book One. I plan to have at least Book Two of the Blue Helix series out in 2020, if not also Book Three. We’ll just have to see what happens.

Of the characters you have created or envisioned, which is your favorite & why?

  • I’m going to stick with Sleepwater Beat’s characters here, because they’re in a world all their own (and still so much like ours). My favorite character in this book is Karl Daleheart—the first character we see in Chapter 1 and the man who becomes something like both Leo’s mentor and an older brother, in a way. He’s the tall, silent, brooding, totally apathetic and kind of a jerk character, though his stoic awareness both terrifies Leo and convinces her that Karl can actually help her. Then he becomes a good friend, and when we see him “in his element” with the other members of Sleepwater, Karl’s character becomes something else entirely. He’s got a super tragic backstory, and he also seems to be my readers’ favorite as well. I plan to bring him back here and there into the other Blue Helix books, though I can’t exactly say how, because… well, spoilers.

Do you favor one type of genre or do you dabble in more than one?

  • Actually, Sleepwater Beat is my first venture outside of Dark Fantasy—a story that had to be told in our world instead of one pulled purely from my own head. Being Dystopian Sci-Fi and Thriller, this book took a lot more research than anything I’ve ever needed for my Dark Fantasy books, which was quite the challenge for me. I really despise research, but it’s necessary when I’m dragging this cast of characters across the United States. I very much enjoy this genre, though, so of course I’ll continue it with the series as well. Still, my heart has a particular soft spot for Dark Fantasy—mostly just dark fiction in general.

Do you plan your stories, or are you a seat of the pants style writer?

  • I am a pantser all the way! Outlining and plotting tends to get pretty boring for me. All the excitement and the “writer’s zone” of creating these stories and characters comes from having to put the puzzle pieces together as they actually unfold. I never know exactly how a story’s going to end, or where the character’s will end up. It all comes together as part of the process, and I’m not sure I could ever outline something any more than a paragraph or two of summary.

What is your best marketing tip?

  • Well, this is a hard one, seeing as I still feel like marketing is the hardest part of being an author, especially an Indie Author. The best piece of advice I have is to, as an author, put yourself out there for your readers, potential readers, and anyone else happening by in ways that have nothing to do with the actual books you’ve written. My weekly live videos on Facebook rarely mention my own books (unless I’m giving them away as prizes). I talk about books I seriously freak out about as a fan, my favorite TV shows, my hilarious quirks, a few odd strings of random association here and there. But I put myself out there as a real person, passionately interested in real things beyond my books, and doing that has been an incredible piece of marketing. It’s that piece of original, authentic, intentional connection with people that has gotten me more organic readers and fans than I ever thought was possible. Yes, it was terrifying at first, but I’m loving the direction in which it’s taken me so far.

 Do you find social media a great tool or a hindrance?

  • Both! It’s an amazing tool when used the right way (which I can’t rightly say I’ve figured out 100% yet). Most of my marketing is done through social media, but it’s also so incredibly easy to get sucked into doing way more than merely marketing. As I’m sure everyone who has any social media accounts has figured out for themselves. I’d like to officially request an extra 12 hours added to the day so I can get all my social media in amid the writing and… well, the rest of my life. And sleep. It’s already a bit in short supply when I write full-time as a mother to a two-year-old as well.

OPTIONAL QUESTIONS

Do you see writing as a career?

  • Writing is my career, 100%. I work from home about 50 hours a week, and because of that ever-looming necessity for marketing and branding, scheduling, and everything else, I write about 40-45 hours a week. But it’s paying the bills, and I wouldn’t have it any other way! It’s been my dream since I first started writing when I was ten, and I’m so fortunate to have turned my love for the craft into a way of life, a career, and the means by which I support my family.

What reward do you give yourself for making a deadline?

  • The best reward ever? I give myself a day off to recharge and pretty much do nothing but read for fun, which is hard enough to fit in as it is when I’m writing full-time. The occasional glass of whiskey never hurt as a celebratory cheer, either.

Bio:
Kathrin Hutson has been writing Fantasy and Sci-Fi since 2000. She can’t get enough of tainted heroes, excruciating circumstances, impossible decisions, and Happy Never After. In addition to writing dark and enchanting fiction, Kathrin spends the other half of her time as a fiction ghostwriter of almost every genre, as an Independent Editor through her company KLH CreateWorks, and as Fiction Co-Editor for Burlington’s Mud
Season Review. She finds just as much joy and enthusiasm in working closely with other fiction authors on their incredible novels as she does in writing her own. Kathrin lives in Vermont with her husband, their young daughter, and their two dogs, Sadie and
Brucewillis, and is constantly on the lookout for other upcoming authors, great new books, and more people with whom to share her love of words.

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Author Interview – Kathie Sutherland

April 9, 2019
mandyevebarnett


AuthorInterview

Author for Fairy Tales Dec 2018.JPG

What inspired your latest novel? A few years ago, I worked with a personal growth mentor on a workbook for telling life story as a myth. I gathered the stories I wrote and from them created The Storyteller: Tales of Enchantment which was recently published by Dream Write Publishing. My weary Gypsy traveller is an elder who shares tales of magic and wonder while passing on wisdom in these short, fanciful pieces. I am currently at work on an autobiographical novel.

Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp? Maturity and aging are ripe with gifts. Elder tales are to be respected as much as traditional fairy tales, which focus on the courage to venture out into the world and seek their fortunes. Instead, my Gypsy Storyteller elder tales touch on the archetypes common to all of us as we age. I hope readers will grasp the deeper message of the stories, seeing in them the courage to confront the challenges of growing old. Our culture is youth-oriented and so I want the reader to appreciate that elders are heroes too.

How much of the book is realistic? These tales are symbolic of the lessons I’ve learned in life. In that respect, they are realistic. The themes are my own observations of loss, self-confrontation, masks, transcendence and seeing wonder in the world, all timeless insights learned by growing old.

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Are your characters based on someone you know, or events in your own life? Each story is a fanciful description of values and strengths I’ve come to accept in myself, and a way to reflect using active imagination and reflection.

Where can readers find you on social media and do you have a blog? I have an author page and a story page on Facebook, and a website with a blog at www.kathiesutherland.com. My blogs are few and far between lately as other writing projects have taken up space in my mind.

Do you have plans or ideas for your next book? Is it a sequel or a stand alone? Most of my writing is “life writing” in one form or another. My work is Self-centered, soulful and focused on wholeness although some think it is self-centered and ego driven.

Of the characters you have created or envisioned, which is your favorite & why? I believe each of us has a story in which we are the protagonist. My Gypsy Storyteller has created these tales to affirm my favorite voices. The Blind Gardener, The Good Wife, Grandmother Spider are all wise characters from my inner world.

Do you favor one type of genre or do you dabble in more than one? I’ve tried many writing genres, all of them focused on life story. Even as a child, my favourite books were fables, songs, fairy tales and classic stories, such as Heidi and Little Women. As an adult, I’ve embraced journaling for personal growth, become a certified journaling facilitator, written poetry and published it in chapbooks and bound books, gathered personal essays into a memoir collection, submitted articles to magazines, had my short stories published in anthologies; all of these works based on life events and family history. I’m currently working on an autobiographic narrative and two novels. I have recently been assisting elders and others at the end of life to identify the values of a lifetime and leave these insightful stories as a “Letter of the Heart” legacy for family and friends.

Do you plan your stories, or are you a seat of the pants style writer? Definitely seat of the pants but the stories are usually based on true events. Having a structure into which the story falls helps me plan.

What is your best marketing tip? This is not a question I feel comfortable with because I quickly lose interest after completing books and hurry off into new projects without marketing the published ones. Its the writing I love. I could use the help of a marketing assistant!

Do you find social media a great tool or a hindrance? I like social media as a way to reach out to others but I have to limit my time with it. My favourite self-expression methods are stories and poems in book form. I love using the computer to write and edit.

OPTIONAL QUESTIONS

What do you enjoy most about writing? Writing is “the way to me.” Every time I write, I learn something about my values, beliefs and strengths. This lifelong learning is very important to me.

What age did you start writing stories/poems? My mother brought our faraway relatives to life with family stories. As a child, I took on the role of correspondent and wrote letters to friends and family. I surprised myself when I wrote a good short story in 10th grade and later, found poetry could express my feelings as an adult in my early 30s. I became serious about life story writing in 2000 after attending a seminar focused on the lives of girls and women. Once I realized I had a story to tell, I embraced life writing.

What genre are you currently reading? Memoir and autobiography mostly. I love a good novel and love to encourage other writers in their efforts to create with words and enjoy acting as first reader for them.

Do you read for pleasure or research or both? Both. I love to learn more about my current interests, and this strength serves me well in my research. For example, I am reading books about building on my innate strengths, accepting my dark side, aging with wisdom and dying with dignity.

Who is your best supporter/mentor/encourager? Other writers and writing groups. My mother is my biggest fan and has read all my books. I have worked with personal coaches and other “balcony” people, including my psychologist.

Where is your favorite writing space? In my office/sanctuary. One of my favourite activities is taking a writers’ retreat whether with others or alone. Solitary time is essential to my writing.

Do you belong to a writing group? If so which one? Two, one in Sherwood Park and one in Fort Saskatchewan. I like to feel I belong, and writers groups are definitely the place I find community.

If you could meet one favorite author, who would it be and why? I am in awe of all writing efforts, because as I said earlier, we all have a story of some sort within us and I’m interested in how we express them.

Do you see writing as a career? I believe my life purpose is to grow into myself. Writing is a way to give my life meaning. Success in a career is simply loving what I do.

Do you nibble as you write? If so what’s your favorite snack food? When I write, my tea gets cold, and the ice in my drink melts. I’m not a snacker at any time!

What reward do you give yourself for making a deadline? I am working on giving myself credit for completing projects and enjoying the fruits of my labour because I don’t do that often enough. I’m usually off on the next bit of writing. My greatest reward is hearing someone say, “I can relate to this character and your writing.”

Other books by Kathie:

 

Bio:

Kathie Sutherland has recently published a collection of Elder Tales “The Storyteller: True Tales of Enchantment.” She is also the author of Things We Keep: A Memoir, and poetry books balancing Act; Shadow Girls in the Spotlight; Wind in the Trees; and Seeking Asylum. She has several large writing projects in the works including three novels.

Kathie is a well-travelled and observant student of life with 30 years of writing experience. In the past, she has facilitated journal writing workshops and is active in her local writing group. Currently, she encourages others as a story listener and writing companion to elders and those at the end of life as they articulate their values stories to share as a legacy in “Letters of the Heart.”

The Storyteller book icon

Ask A Question Thursday

March 7, 2019
mandyevebarnett


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Today’s question is:

Have you ever changed the ending of a book based off the reaction of editors or beta-readers?

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Comments from last week’s question:

What do you think is the most unethical practice in the writing community? Is it plagiarism, ‘vanity’ publishing companies, copyright violations or something else?

I think plagiarism and copyright violations go hand-in-hand. As an artist who has found my work for sale on pirate websites, I can tell you that it really sucks when someone steals your work. Am I flattered that they find my work worthy of copying? No!

Gerri Bowen Piracy.
Ashley Cockerill I agree. Piracy.

Author Interview – Ellen Notbohm

February 19, 2019
mandyevebarnett


AuthorInterview

Ellen Notbohm 12 2017

What inspired your latest novel?

Through many years of genealogy work, I’ve learned that every family has that one person—the one nobody will talk about, the one with the aura of taboo around him or her. Three generations back, Analiese Rushton (not her real name) was that person in our family tree.

It took a lot of digging and a grain of luck to find out why—she faced recurring perinatal and postpartum psychosis at a time when neither medicine or society understood it. Given the intense social stigma of mental illness in Annie’s day, aggravated by stark gender bias in both courts of law and courts of public opinion, what we now know to be a bona fide and treatable medical condition threatened to cost Annie nearly everything that matters to most of us—family, home, health, safety, the right to self-determination. I also learned that maternal mental health was the rarest of subjects in historical fiction; it almost felt like publishing too was infected with that zipped-lips taboo. I wanted to tell Annie’s story in a way that would heal ills and injustices, and topple that taboo.

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How did you come up with the title?

That’s a fun chicken-egg question I can’t fully answer. When I started writing, I had a working title that I knew wouldn’t be the final title. One of the things I love about novels is that Aha! moment when you’re reading along and come upon the title of the book. To Kill a Mockingbird and The Color Purple are a couple of potent examples. So as I was writing, I had my “third ear” open, listening for possible titles. I considered several that didn’t feel quite right. Then up popped “The River by Starlight” and there it was. Readers will know from the first page of the book that it’s from a journal entry by Henry David Thoreau. But they have to read some chapters in to find out how it impacts the story and why it’s a thread that carries throughout the book.                                                                         

Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

Although The River by Starlight confronts loss and grief in many shape-shifting forms, it’s not a tale of depth-less terror and tragedy. I would not and could not have written a book like that. Edmonton historian Tony Cashman is a dear friend of mine, and in his testimonial, he described the book as “a story told with deep understanding of the human heart, which won’t abandon hope.” That refusal to abandon hope—Annie’s astonishing resilience and tenacity in the face of devastating events, is a tribute to the luminescence of the human spirit that lives in all of us. That’s why I wrote the book. I didn’t think she should be the one nobody talks about. I wanted her to be the one everybody talks about. 

How much of the book is realistic?

100%. I put in over a decade of research, including six trips to Montana, Edmonton, and North Dakota. Much of the book describes events that did take place, and most of what I made up was also based on that research. I consulted more than 40 libraries and archives, read more than 1,000 homestead accounts, close to 100 books, and several miles of microfilmed newspapers.

Where can readers find you on social media and do you have a blog?

You can find me on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Pinterest, and Instagram. I have two blogs on my website, for fiction and nonfiction. My Facebook page is a very interactive community of readers from more than 40 countries.

Do you have plans or ideas for your next book? Is it a sequel or a stand alone?

I’m percolating an idea based on another long-ago real person, whose early life was a dramatic brew of siblings lost to an epidemic, the Civil War, and historic upheaval within her faith community. She eventually landed in Dayton, Ohio, in the same neighborhood as an interesting pair of brothers who claimed to be building a flying machine. Once I start writing a bit, I’ll know if she wants to tell me her story.

Of the characters you have created or envisioned, which is your favorite & why?

Like the children’s book, I Love You the Purplest, my mother impressed upon me that her children were so different from each other, it meant that each was her favorite in their own way. It’s just that way for my characters in The River by Starlight, many of whom I love, but in ways that defy comparison. Nor do I have a favorite villain, and at least one reader agreed, in what is a favorite comment: “The characters are real and pop off the page. I have empathy, sorrow, joy, and want to choke a number of them!”

Do you favor one type of genre or do you dabble in more than one?

As writers, we’re often told to write what we know, but also told to write what scares us, or write what we want to know. I’d written four nonfiction books and countless essays and advice columns when I decided to write a historical novel. I can’t say enough about how expansive it’s been, in every way, to stretch myself into uncharted territory as a writer. I’m eager to both continue on with what I’m good at, and to push my pencil into forms and genres I haven’t before considered.

Do you plan your stories, or are you a seat of the pants style writer?

Pantser! I’ll start with a spark of an idea and see where the research takes me. When I start writing, the story will either bloom or fall flat. If it blooms, I go on, listening with my “third ear” and following the arc of the story as my research expands. It’s almost like a game where I’m given facts or leads or provocative questions, I work them into the story, then listen for how the characters are going to respond. I’m constantly judging the messages I’m portraying, whether I’m getting it right, and also gauging when it’s necessary for me to take literary license and depart from that.

What is your best marketing tip?

Find what you’re best at and focus on that. It’s good and appropriate to stretch yourself to do things that may be a bit beyond your comfort zone but none of us can be good at everything, let alone have the time or money to do it all. If you really hate, say, a particular social media platform or blogging or podcasts or live events or whatever, be unapologetic about saying no to it. I believe readers pick up on insincerity, so connect them with your best self.

Do you find social media a great tool or a hindrance?

In all things, balance. It’s every author’s choice whether to invest time and effort in a social media presence, but to forego it entirely is to greatly limit your ability to connect with readers and potential readers. Readers expect an internet presence, and other less immediate sources may not come to mind. At the same time, neither is an author obligated to spend untold hours on social media. How much presence, how much effort an author wants to devote to her digital platform is entirely individual, and there’s no “right” amount. I know authors who are only on Facebook, or only on Twitter, and post only when they feel they have something to say. Writers have to prioritize the writing, ruminating, and revising that make us writers in the first place.

What do you enjoy most about writing?

The magic of it. Watching words flow out of a pencil tip, watching words form sentences, sentences form paragraphs, paragraphs form whole stories. Sometimes it’s almost like I’m an observer.

Has your genre changed or stayed the same?

Genre is such a fluid thing to me. Though the writing of my fiction and nonfiction were vastly different experiences, there was enough crossover for me to loosen the boundaries in my mind of what “genre” means. My novel has been recognized with awards for historical fiction, regional fiction, literary fiction. My nonfiction books and historical articles have a strong storytelling element to them. I hope to cross a few more genre thresholds before I’m done.

What genre are you currently reading?

I’m usually reading several books at any given time; right now I’m reading a historical novel, a memoir, a creative nonfiction, and a classic.

Do you read for pleasure or research or both?

They’re inseparable, because research is one of my greatest pleasures. It’s entertaining, informational, emotionally and intellectually challenging. In a way, everything I read is research. It all lodges in my conscious or subconscious and finds its way into my writing in one way or another, either by what I include or what I choose not to include.

 

Where is your favorite writing space?

In my head, of course!

Do you see writing as a career?

Sure, because the definition of “career” is as broad as a writer’s mind allows it to be. I just internet-searched the definition, and the first one that came up was, “an occupation undertaken for a significant period of a person’s life and with opportunities for progress.” Notice it doesn’t mention earning money? I’ve been blessed to have been able to earn a living as a writer, but I know countless writers who’ve been writing and publishing gloriously for years without earning a living. Their work is no less worthy than mine of being called a career. If we read only “career writers” as defined in the conventional sense (money-makers), the breadth and depth of what we read would be far poorer indeed.

Do you nibble as you write? If so what’s your favorite snack food?

When I’m “in the zone,” I have to remember to breathe, let alone eat. Although for a few blissful weeks in the summer, no day is complete until I’ve eaten my weight in blueberries.

What reward do you give yourself for making a deadline?

Making a deadline is its own reward. I’ve high-fived the wall more than a few times in my career.

BIO

An award-winning author in both nonfiction and fiction, Ellen Notbohm’s work has informed, inspired, and guided millions of readers in more than twenty languages. In addition to her acclaimed historical novel The River by Starlight and her globally renowned books on autism and, her articles and columns on such diverse subjects as history, genealogy, baseball, writing and community affairs have appeared in major publications and captured audiences on every continent.

The River by Starlight has been recognized with awards for historical, regional, and literary fiction. Its focus on maternal mental health and gender bias in the early 20th century explores a history rarely addressed in fiction.

Explore Ellen’s work and subscribe to her blogs and newsletter at http://www.ellennotbohm.com.

Connect through social media:

Facebook – Ellen Notbohm, Author

Twitter: @EllenNotbohm

Instagram: Ellen Notbohm

 

Ask A Question Thursday

February 7, 2019
mandyevebarnett


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Today’s question is:

When your narrative is set in a real location do you research it or do you visit it?

What are the pros & cons of utilizing the internet to find out about a location versus actually staying there?

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Feel free to answer the question in the comments.

Last week’s responses to the question:

Have you been asked to ‘explain’ a character trait?

Were you happy to explain it or do/did you feel it took something away from the narrative?

Interesting question. When readers take the time to express loathing for your antagonist, you know that you’ve done your job.

I have an adult thriller/suspense I wrote that focuses on a forensic team trying to bring down a sociopath serial killer. He showed absolutely no remorse for killing his pregnant ex-girlfriend and her new boyfriend. When he was sentenced, he vowed revenge on the entire forensic team. He is a drug abuser and blames everyone from his past, and those currently who are his targets, for the path that he’s on. I wrote this novel from the POV of the Forensic Psychologist then added a short chapter here and there to see the killer from his own view. Although I’ve never been asked to give an empathetic view of this character, my sharing his POV sort of gives a bit of background to answer the ‘why’s’ of his state of mind and his anger. I’m not sure he deserves empathy, but at the very least he shows his own logic for his actions. 😉

If you would like to contribute to last week’s question please reply to that post’s comments. Thank you

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