Tag Archives: Online Writing

Excerpt #1 – Willow Tree Tears


As writers we all know the struggle of editing and revision once the first draft is completed. I am continuing to ‘polish’ my western romance, Willow Tree Tears. Today’s excerpt centers around my protagonist, Madison. She is thrilled about seeing the delicious Italian again but also discovers something is wrong with her father. I would welcome comments regarding how this excerpt relates her relationships and if it gives you an idea of her personality.

Madison’s excitement kept her awake. Today, Lucio would be revisiting. She admonished herself, trying to sleep. You will look absolutely awful tomorrow with great big bags under my eyes and sallow skin. Fall asleep, damn it. Eventually, she gave in and took half a sleeping tablet fearing a whole one would have her sleep in. The crash of a pan downstairs frightened her awake at seven o’clock. Was that Pops? She hurriedly grabbed her rope and ran down the stairs into the kitchen. She found her father scooping scrambled eggs off the mat and swearing under his breath.

“Frightened me half to death, Pops. What happened?”

“Damn thing slipped right out of my hand. Darndest thing.”

“Sit down, I’ll clean up the rest, Pops, if there’s anything to clear up Bandit seems to have managed most of it. Are you sure you are okay?”

“No need to fuss, girl. It just slipped.”

Madison bent down to mop up the grease off the tiles. From the corner of her eye she could see her father rub his left arm and then smack it as if it were numb. He’s keeping something from me. Maybe Doc wasn’t out this way for someone else the day I passed him on the road.

             With the floor clean, Madison made a new batch of scrambled eggs while her father began to make a pot of coffee. Bandit slumped down under the kitchen table satisfied with his early morning treat but kept one eye on Madison just in case there was another spill.

“Pops, how about using only two scoops this morning?”

“It’ll have no taste, girl.”

“It certainly will, Pops, and my heart won’t be racing afterwards and neither will yours.”

Her father didn’t argue. There is something wrong. He would have fought for the usual four scoops any other time. I’m going to talk to Doc the first chance I get, patient confidentially or not. I need to know what’s going on. Breakfast was served and eaten almost in silence apart from the scraping of cutlery on plates, as father and daughter were lost in their own thoughts. Madison carefully watched her father ascend the stairs. He’s leaning to his left and favoring his right arm, I hadn’t noticed until now.

             On her way to her room, Madison peered into her father’s room. He was sitting on the bed rubbing his arm again. Does it hurt? Should I say something? I’ll talk to Doc first then I’ll know what I need to do. In the meantime I need to take more notice of what he’s doing.

Copyright 2015 – Mandy Eve-Barnett  – Willow Tree Tears.

Juggling Family and Writing Commitments…


reblog

Many of us have to juggle family commitments while writing. Finding the ‘perfect’ balance between the two is always a challenge. You may be in the depths of a scene when a small hand lands on your lap and pleading eyes look up at you. Can you delay the toddler’s wants for your own? Do you crumble and leave the narrative in the hope you will remember the details later?

No matter what age your children are or how involved your partner, there is always a demand for your attention. There will be times when you just want to immerse yourself in your creativity, undisturbed. These three blog posts cover some of the emotions and stresses felt. As well as tips on how to organize your time productively.

http://thewriteconversation.blogspot.ca/2013/07/prioritiesjuggling-family-commitments.html

http://itsjustalittlething.wordpress.com/2013/10/22/on-fighting-sentiment

http://thewritersalleys.blogspot.ca/2010/06/juggling-summer-days-and-writing.html

Juggling Summer

How do you manage to juggle your family life and writing life?

As your children become older, is it easier?

Can you rely on a partner, friend or family member to entertain while you write?

What tips can you share?

How Do You View Romance..?


rose book

Love makes the world go round – it’s an old adage but is alive and well in romance novels around the globe.

Historically, romance writing has been in existence since classical times. It is thought the 1740 novel, Pamela, or Virtue Rewarded by Samuel Richardson to be one of the earliest true romance novels. The narrative relates a courtship told entirely by the female protagonist. A century later, Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice epitomized the genre and in many ways launched the genre we know so well today.

Modern romance novels are divided into multiple genres :

Contemporary, historical, romantic suspense, paranormal, science fiction, fantasy, time-travel, inspirational, multicultural and erotic.

These in turn are divided into sub-genres:  (and more appear annually)

Adventure, African-American, category, chick-lit, dark fantasy, erotica, futuristic, gothic, interracial, LGBT, mainstream, menage a trois, military, M/M, multi-cultural, mystery/thriller, Regency, rock n’ roll, single title, sweet, traditional, urban fantasy, World War II-era, Yaoi and young adult.

The sheer choice available to authors within this one genre is mind boggling. No matter your preferred genre, you can adapt it to be included into a ‘romance’ genre. Given this free range of setting and era; as long as you have boy meets girl as the theme, your narrative can be included under either one or more sub categories.

There are still the corset rippers, as they used to be called, but now a days reader choice is much wider. For an author, the flexibility in this one genre, allows for a more personal viewpoint through their own favored format and ‘type’ of writing. The idea of romance is a personal one, affected by our own experiences and preference.

In my speculative fiction novel, Life in Slake Patch, my protagonist, Evan, had to abide to laws forbidding daily contact with his loved one, while my novel, The Twesome Loop followed my female protagonists in finding love through reincarnation and my novella, The Rython Kingdom fantasy dealt with a troubadour falling for a good sorceress. When I was investigating branding, it became clear my novels all have a ‘love’ based theme, although not always romantic love.

Have you written romance? 

Which genre or sub-genre did it fall into?

How do you view romance novels?

http://www.worldliteraturetoday.org/2014/january/persistence-romanticism-world-literature-william-black#.UukSsfldXfI

 

LifeinSlakePatch 001

Twesome Loop 002

http://www.amazon.com/The-Rython-Kingdom-Mandy-Eve-Barnett/dp/1927510236

http://www.smashwords.com/books/view/214247
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Too Much Ruminating…


Ruminate – definition: 1) to chew the cud, as a cow does 2) to think over and over again : ponder

editor

Is it counter productive to ruminate over a story idea? Are we in danger of over thinking the story, it’s plot and characters? Out lines are one thing but can we lose the essence of the creative process by pre-planning too much detail?

As you all know I write by the seat of my pants and let my muse have free rein. The idea grows naturally with my characters telling me their story. Once the tale is completed then I go back to edit and revise. This way, I feel I have not lost anything and can be pulled along with my protagonist.

We all have a process unique to our creativity. Recently, I attended an interview with Alistair MacLeod, a Canadian author of short stories. His technique of editing line by line would cancel out my creative process immediately but it is the way he has worked for decades. I can’t fathom how he can retain his idea, if each line has to be perfect before he continues.

These comments show different perspectives:

Ann Beattie

Because I don’t work with an outline, writing a story is like crossing a stream, now I’m on this rock, now I’m on this rock, now I’m on this rock.”

Susan Howe

“I often think of the space of a page as a stage, with words, letters, syllable characters moving across.”

Here are some more: http://www.brainpickings.org/index.php/2012/11/20/daily-routines-writers/

Just had to add: http://azevedosreviews.wordpress.com/2013/05/30/stephen-kings-20-quotes-on-writing/

What is your process like? 

Promises of Things to Come…


Augur – definition: to give promise of something to come later

Publicity techniques are as numerous as there are stories. Whether you are happy to have your tales shared only with family and friends or explode it onto the global community, a little augur goes a long way.

editor

The internet is full of tips, publicity companies and helpful blogs from other authors. These can give you ideas on how to promote your stories to best effect.

The first step is to identify your story’s genre. This may seem easy at first but every story has may elements within them. The trick is to identify the main theme and make it the focus of how you promote your book.

I am not going to list endless examples or sites that can help – each of us has our own view and idea of how we want our story to be perceived. However, giving our potential readership teasers and an insight into the world we have created is a good place to start.

Use genre specific forums and sites as places to enthuse and share your forthcoming story.

genre