Tag Archives: poems

Writing Prompt Wednesday


9781608636921

Tell a story of when you broke something…

This is my story.

baubles

I was sure the glass bauble was secured on the tree. I’d made a point to check the wire. As a family heirloom it was important to me to keep the shiny ornament high enough on the Christmas tree so little fingers and large paws did not dislodge it. As I turned to retrieve another bauble I hear a crash – my heart sank. There on the tiled floor was my great-great grandmother’s bauble in a thousand pieces. I fell to my knees, tears brimming over my cheeks. Shock held me still for several moments. With great care I gathered the glass shards, tiny pinpricks cutting my fingertips as I did so. The light glanced off the opalescent pieces. My heart ached, how could I ever replace it. With the last few pieces held in my hand, I began to get up, but a small piece of paper tied with a silk thread caught my eye. Placing the shards on the tiles, I picked up the small paper bundle and unwrapped it. Inside was a beautifully written note in cursive writing.

                To whoever finds this note, may your wish come true, Celia

That was my great-great grandmother’s name. Why had she hidden such a note in the bauble? I turned around at footsteps – there in front of me was my daughter. What a wonderful surprise and one I’d wished for. Her global travels had taken her away for so long and she had once again said she could not make it home for Christmas.

                “You’re here, oh my love it is wonderful to have you home.”

                “I was given a free ticket from a friend, who had other commitments. It was so unexpected. I wanted to surprise you.”

My wish had come true, had the bauble made it so?

Why not write one and share it?

Interview Brian Hayden – An Experience of Holding onto Life…


Brian Hayden

What inspired you to write your first book?

My first Book, “Understanding Strategic And Tactical Planning” was a surprise. I was the Chief Operating Officer for Specialty, 24 hour and Emergency Animal Hospitals for a national Animal hospital company. I wrote some notes, intended to help our hospital managers understand the process of operating animal hospitals. The American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA) saw it. They asked me to expand it into a book.

1583260196 VET

The next two books dealt with my death. “Death: Living To Talk About It” started out as a blog. I had just come out of hospice, where I was supposed to have died. I began a blog – the sole purpose was try to understand the ordeal I went through.

Tell us a little about yourself before your experience.

I am happily married, with two grown children. I have six grandsons. Before the problems began, I was an Air Force Master Sargent, stationed in England. I was 35 years old when I first died.

What were your ‘belief’s on life after death at that time (if any)?

I hadn’t really thought about life after death. Just the usual passing thought now and then. That changed when I was in hospice, waiting to die.

I was visited by both of my grandmothers. They had passed many years before.  Though I was drugged and dying, years of reflection bring me to one conclusion. My grandmothers were with me – watching and waiting. I talk about this in detail, in am upcoming book.

book cover

How did you come up with the title?

The title of my first post death experience book came easily. “Death: Living To Talk About It”. Having died  (actually died) 5 times and had “should have died” moments more than 200 times – well, the title just presented itself.

Is this your first book?

This was not my first book. The management book I mentioned earlier was my first book. During that period, I had written several scripts for education videos.

Why did you decide to write about your experience?

At first, I wanted to write about my experiences to help me understand what had happened to me. Later, the motivation shifted. As the blog was progressing, I received feedback from many people. They appreciated me sharing my story. It was informational, and it let people know that they are not alone. Lots of people struggle with serious health issues. They were comforted knowing others were experiencing the same things they were.

What message do you want to send to your readers?

Hope. It’s a powerful word. When you read my books, you understand the adversity and struggles I had for many years. Never give up. Think to yourself: If he can still be skulking about after all that he has gone through, maybe then I can too.

Road to Transplant

How many books have you written (published or unpublished)?

“Road To Transplant” is the sequel to the “Death” book. It is an international bestselling book that chronicles my journey for life. Great information. It examines family dynamics during family crisis, looks into the process of getting a heart transplant, and follows me through the process of dying – not knowing if a heart would become available.

I’ve also written a book. “Five Short Stories and Twelve Poems”. I desperately needed a diversion from talking about illness. It is a fun book. The stories will make you laugh, cry, be happy and sad.

Poems.jpg

What book are you reading now?

I am re-reading “A Movable Feast” by Hemmingway. His words stir the creative juices in my mind. I always read him, and the Russian writers of the 18th and 19th century as I write my own stories.

Can you tell us about your upcoming book?

I have a second book of short stories and poems in the works. Also a historical fiction is almost completed. Both books should be available in about a year.

How do we find your books, blog and bio?

Everything you never knew you wanted to know about me is on my web page. Along with excerpts from my books, reviews and links to purchase them. Also, you will find a great blog that nearly a half million people have read.

Go to Brianhayden.net for all stuff ME!

Thanks for taking a moment out of your day to know more about me, and my work.

Brian has also made videos on the dangers of smoking. See below.

 

 

Emotional Turmoil Enhances Your Writing…


emotions

In my previous post, I discussed how various weather conditions affect our writing and its schedule, however, our emotions and physical condition also influence our moods and in turn our writing. Strong emotions, such as anger or depression subdue our creativity while feelings of love and happiness enhance it. If we are suffering an illness, our mind is filled with pain, discomfort or tiredness. Our concentration is in short supply or our focus limited. To pour out these feelings in words can dispel some of them.

Poetry is one of the forms of expression that lends itself to most emotional dispositions. Such as Edgar Allen Poe’s poem, Alone, digs into deep and dark emotions.

alone

While Lord Bryon’s, She Walks in Beauty is the exact opposite.Happy, light and free.

walks

As writers, we learn to use these emotional insights to the benefit of our craft. It gives us an idea how our characters may react to a certain situation and thus breathes life into our stories. Of course when we are in the midst of these feelings they are possibly too raw to even contemplate using but as with all things time heals. Jot down how it felt to be angry, shocked, sad, joyful or happy. Did your body feel different? Was your mind erratic or focused? When the feeling passed, what changes did you notice?

When you can look back at that emotion and look deeply into it, it is there we find inspiration – it will strengthen our writing – and also (hopefully) help you resolve barriers in character development.

How do you find your emotional state affects your writing?

Have you used a personal emotion to good effect in your writing?

Did an emotion inspire a story?

Mournful Feelings…


Mournful – definition: feeling or showing sadness

I will share  poems by a couple classic authors today, as my grief is far too new to write anything.  Sorry.

statue

I Measure Every Grief I Meet by Emily Dickinson

I measure every Grief I meet
With narrow, probing, eyes – 
I wonder if It weighs like Mine – 
Or has an Easier size.

I wonder if They bore it long – 
Or did it just begin – 
I could not tell the Date of Mine – 
It feels so old a pain – 

I wonder if it hurts to live – 
And if They have to try – 
And whether – could They choose between – 
It would not be – to die – 

I note that Some – gone patient long – 
At length, renew their smile –  
An imitation of a Light
That has so little Oil – 

I wonder if when Years have piled –  
Some Thousands – on the Harm –  
That hurt them early – such a lapse
Could give them any Balm –  

Or would they go on aching still
Through Centuries of Nerve – 
Enlightened to a larger Pain –  
In Contrast with the Love –  

The Grieved – are many – I am told –  
There is the various Cause –  
Death – is but one – and comes but once –  
And only nails the eyes –  

There's Grief of Want – and grief of Cold –  
A sort they call "Despair" –  
There's Banishment from native Eyes – 
In sight of Native Air –  

And though I may not guess the kind –  
Correctly – yet to me
A piercing Comfort it affords
In passing Calvary –  To note the fashions – of the Cross –  
And how they're mostly worn –  
Still fascinated to presume
That Some – are like my own –

mournful_moon

SONNET 64 – William Shakespeare

When I have seen by Time’s fell hand defaced
The rich proud cost of outworn buried age;
When sometime lofty towers I see down-razed
And brass eternal slave to mortal rage;
When I have seen the hungry ocean gain
Advantage on the kingdom of the shore,
And the firm soil win of the watery main,
Increasing store with loss and loss with store;
When I have seen such interchange of state,
Or state itself confounded to decay;
Ruin hath taught me thus to ruminate,
That Time will come and take my love away.
This thought is as a death, which cannot choose
But weep to have that which it fears to lose.