Mandy Eve-Barnett's Blog for Readers & Writers

My Book News & Advocate for the Writing Community ©

Wordsmith’s Collective Thursday – What Motivates You To Write?

August 6, 2020
mandyevebarnett


What is your motivation for writing? There are as many reasons to write as there are genres. We may want to persuade, catalog or inform on ‘real’ events or topics but many of us (fiction authors) want to entertain. It is an author’s purpose, to bring to life a concept.

So let’s look at each scenario for motivation:

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a) Money – we would all love to be a best seller and have fame and fortune like the ‘big’ names, such as Stephen King, J.K. Rowling and the like. However, we need to be realistic – firstly can we manage to get a publishing contract with a big publishing house? How many years are you willing to wait for that? If you use the self-publishing route how much of your time (unpaid) can you sacrifice for promotion? Should you give your work away? Is the income enough to live on? Could your writing supplement your lifestyle?

If you determine that the net income (we all need to report it in tax season!) is a nice bonus for a treat here and there, rather than your sole income – it will take the stress out of the equation.
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b) Success – once again we should temper our expectations. Global sales are a dream we want to make real but maybe measure our success on more of a local level. Do you have your books in local bookstores, the library, offered at local events? The more you attend and promote within your own locality the more your ‘success’ becomes tangible. Articles in the local newspaper could have people approach or question you in regard to your being an author. Social media allows us to expand our locality, of course, but starting small will give you a firm basis from which to start. Never under estimate the power of word of mouth for promotion.

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c) Satisfaction – Although this is third on the list, I feel it is the most important of all, as having your words, ideas and stories readily available for people to read now and for future generations, is the penultimate success. Our narratives will be enjoyed and relayed long after we are gone. It is our legacy.

Obviously, in an ideal world, a mixture of all three of the above would be the perfect scenario.

What is your motivation?

What do you consider the most satisfying part of being a writer/author?

Wordsmiths Collective Thursday – #AuthorToolboxBlogHop – Hashtags for Writers, Authors & the Writing Community

April 16, 2020
mandyevebarnett


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Today’s #AuthorToolboxBlogHop

We are all vying for attention on social media and one of the ways we can get more exposure is to use hashtags.

Put simply a hashtag is a label for content. It helps followers, who are interested in a certain topic, quickly find content on that same topic. Once someone clicks on that hashtag, they’ll be brought to a page that aggregates all of the posts with the same hashtags, in real-time. It is also a great way to discover other authors, writers and books in your genre(s).

Hashtags can be used on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. There is a plethora of them specific for writers, authors, readers, the writing community and books. Here are a few but I’m sure you can list more!

Hashtags for writers.

#amwriting #amediting #writingtip or #writetip #writingprompt
#book #novel #nonfiction #fiction #paperbacks #short or #short #story or #shortstories or #shortreads #litfic #histfic and #histnovel #womensfiction
#scifi or #science #fiction #romance #paranormal #crime #suspense #kidlit #Writing #AmWriting #Creativity #Editing #WordCount #WriteChat #WriteGoal #WritingPrompt #WIP #StoryStarter #Creativity #MustRead #Novelines #FridayReads #TeaserTues #WriteTip #WritersLife #WritersLifeChat #5amwritersclub #WritingCommunity #readercommunity

Now over to you – how many more can you list?

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More Toolbox Blogs here: https://raimeygallant.com/

 

Wordsmith’s Collective Thursday – Author Platform

January 9, 2020
mandyevebarnett


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As published authors, we soon realize that writing the book is only half the story – literally! Now we have to promote it in order to sell it. When I published my first children’s picture book, Rumble’s First Scare this became clear quite quickly, when I was asked where my author platform was. As a new author, I had not heard of or experienced an author platform, never mind created one.

It was a steep learning curve for sure and I began this blog, with a lot of trepidation as I did not have a clue what I was doing. It has, over the past ten years, morphed into a site for support, sharing and encouragement for the writing community and I am proud to be a writing community advocate. However, I am refocusing in 2020 to get back to posting about my writing life as well. So back to the point in hand.

An author platform can range from a just a website or blog highlighting your books to being present on a multitude of social media sites and promoting your novels but also your writing life.

I am sharing a really good definition of an author platform, written by Jane Friedman. It certainly gives us a guide as to what to include and not. https://www.janefriedman.com/author-platform-definition/

So what are the first steps to creating a platform?

1. Put up a website and/or blog and purchase a domain name for it.

2. Write articles and publish them online, utilizing your ‘expertise’ on whatever topic you know. It can be parenting, traveling, baking etc.

3. For fiction writers find literary magazines where you can publish short stories then share the links.

4. If you have a book ready for publication, there are numerous ways to gather interest. Post excerpts, the new cover, a character interview, events you are attending etc.

6. Start webinars and/or interviews online. And organize a blog book tour.

7. BLOG!! Make your posts interesting and make sure you edit! It also allows you to acquire an email list.

8. You do not need to be on every social media site – apart from anything else it is a lot of work! Decide which ones you are comfortable maintaining and how your theme/topic/message can be related on them.

9. Create a newsletter to send to your email list – giving glimpses into the narrative, special offers etc.

What author platform tips can you share?

What has your experience been creating your platform?

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Marketing Tips from Authors

May 28, 2019
mandyevebarnett


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As we are nearly at the halfway point for this year’s author interviews, I thought it would be interesting to review the answers I received to the question: What is your best marketing tip?

The answers are varied and, I think reflect how comfortable (or not!) writers are when it comes to promoting ourselves.

These are not on any specific order.

1) Be consistent on social media and within your local community

2) To have a blog

3) Build an authentic brand

4) Connect with other authors in the same genre and be a presence in specific social groups relating to it.

5) Word-of-mouth promotion

6) Promotional items sold separately reflecting the book/genre i.e. toys, necklaces, headbands etc. Also hand-out bookmarks everywhere you can.

7) Live videos/podcasts either on Facebook or YouTube – this can be book specific or about you as a person and your writing/genre.

8) Be original, authentic, and make intentional connections

9) Utilize your readers/tribe to help promote through social media and local connections.

10) Use your connections that are involved in newspapers/magazines etc.

11) Talk to your local library and bookstores. Offer your time to do signings/readings.

12) Use Canvas to create your own ads for Twitter and Facebook.

13)  Youtube book trailers.

14) Market yourself as an author before you market your books.

15) Take part in interviews, whether online or face-to-face.

What have you found works best for your book promotion?

 

 

Ask A Question Thursday

March 14, 2019
mandyevebarnett


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Today’s question is:

How did publishing your first book change your process of writing?

Did you feel more pressure to improve from your last book? Were you writing a series or a standalone?

How did you balance writing with promotion for your last book?

published

Last week’s conversation: Have you ever changed the ending of a book based off the reaction of editors or beta-readers?

Only have one book out and actually thought the ending might need to be embellished more. However, all 4 Betas found it satisfying…so it stayed. Saved me a ton of revision.

Mandy Eve-Barnett

I only changed one ending because it was thought a cliff hanger to a standalone would not be favored by readers. I added another chapter due to the feedback I received for Life in Slake Patch.

Click the post and comment below. Join the conversation.

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