Mandy Eve-Barnett's Blog for Readers & Writers

My Book News & Advocate for the Writing Community ©

Author Tool Box Blog Hop – Tips on Promoting Your Book

October 17, 2019
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 #AuthorToolBoxBlogHop 

As writers and authors, we are formidable in our ability to create narratives but we also have to learn how to market the ‘end product’ of those many months or even years of creativity. We become a book business.

  1. The first avenue many authors take is social media, which can be seen as a ‘soft’ option. After all we are not up close and personal with the public but at arm’s length. However, due to the countless sites available just choosing the ‘right’ one or two can be overwhelming. Then there is the matter of maintaining our ‘presence’ on each platform. We need to research which avenues of promotion will work best not just for our genres but also our ability to sustain them. Do your research on similar authors in your genre and see what they use (and of course ‘follow’ them).

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     2. Following selected authors, genre based bloggers, book reviewers, and writing        groups allows you to gain followers but also to learn about your particular genre   and gain a reader base. When someone is interested in your genre they ‘search’ for more posts, articles, links and books within that specific field. While you are doing that follow 10 ‘friends’ of friends on Facebook and 100 people on Twitter – this can gain a wider audience. However, in light of these two platforms losing participants also follow people on Instagram. (We have to keep up with the ‘in’ thing!)

3. Improve your author bio on all platforms to entice and inform as many followers as possible on all sales sites, your blog and social media platforms. Ask yourself – does it reflect you as a writer as well as a person.

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4. Use hashtags specific to writing, authors, books, genre and associated links – look at what other authors use.

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5. Then there is the personal touch, which means organizing or being involved in author readings, attending book events and participating in Q&A panels. Search your local area for book related events, get to know your local bookstores, inquire at your library, join a local writing group, the wider your reach the easier it will be to find avenues of sale for your book.

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6. Merchandise is another way of promoting your book. It can be as simple as custom bookmarks to T-shirts with the book cover/main character on the front. Make up a prize basket for a contest to be collected at an event (good photo opportunity to use on social media) or create an online contest for a free autographed copy of your book.

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7. An easy promotion is to leave five of your author business cards in local businesses, at the doctor’s or dentist’s office, or anywhere you visit on a regular basis. Many places have community boards too so pin some cards or a poster of an event you are attending there too.

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Do you have any promotion tips you would like to share?

Nano Blog and Social Media Hop2

 

Invitation to a Writing Conference…

February 12, 2014
mandyevebarnett


If you can make it, my writing foundation is hosting a conference. All welcome. There are plenty of nice hotels for those traveling to Sherwood Park, Alberta. Details here and Early ird Prize draw deadline looming…get in quick!

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My 555 blog post – just saying!

Have a great week…

 

We got a mention on Danyelle’s Links – grateful for that –  http://paper.li/DanyelleLeafty

Register for a Writing Conference Here:

January 17, 2014
mandyevebarnett


Registration is open – Early Bird prize option.

If you enjoy the written word and want to increase your skill set you should attend.

http://wfscsherwoodpark.com/event/nine-ninety-nine-writing-all-ages-conference

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Annual Writers Conference…

April 5, 2013
mandyevebarnett


Peruse – definition: 1) a. to examine or consider with attention and in detail ; study; b. to look over or through in a casual manner 2) read; especially : to read carefully or thoroughly.

Over the last several months I have been working on the Conference Planning Committee of my writing group, the Writers Foundation of Strathcona County. This is our fourth conference and it is always well received. Here are the details – just in case you are planning on coming.

http://www.wfscsherwoodpark.com/fp/chapter-8-discover-your-next-chapter

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Tips for choosing a conference:

A writer‘s conference gives you the opportunity to learn and network both of which are valuable to the novice and experienced writer. You should consider –

* does the content fit your needs at this stage of your writing? * do the benefits outweigh any costs that might be paid? * what do you hope to gain from your attendance / participation? * does it offer more than bragging rights – are you going just to say you’ve been to a conference or rub elbows with so-and-so? * does it offer a range of opportunities?

When deciding if a conference is worth the time and effort, a writer must look at, not only the cost of going but the benefits gleaned from the experience. Writing is a lonely activity, for the most part, and a chance to make a connection with others who share your passion is a great opportunity but also a big investment. By investment we are not only referring to the fees accompanying conference registration but also the time it takes to attend a conference. Both must be considered thoroughly – would your money be spent wiser elsewhere, or would it be time better spent, say, writing?

The content offered by a conference will either meet your needs or it won’t, depending upon the stage of your writing and the expectations you have for your writing future. “Never stop learning” should be a component of every writer’s life and it drives your decision when you select the workshops you might attend and the value they have to you. Consider if they are introductory, mid-level, or advanced – or are they general enough / specific enough to offer you something to ‘take home.’

The whole purpose in attending a conference should be to further your writing journey. If you are going, just to say you’ve been, or perhaps a chance to slip your unsolicited manuscript into the hands of an unsuspecting editor, think again and reconsider your actions and your reasons for attending. What do you pay? A writer only has to peruse the listing of the many conferences hosted throughout the year and the country to realize that costs vary, with some be out of reach for the emerging writer, or someone on a tight budget. Consider again, the benefits in relation to the cost.

Check out the conference programs and who is hosting the function. A conference about speculative fiction or sci-fi fantasy may intrigue some writers but not everyone writes in this genre and although the fundamentals of writing and character development or plotting apply to any genre, a whole conference geared toward this particular style of work, might not benefit all writers.

If you have to make choices, it might be more appropriate to find a conference geared directly to the type of writing you do or one that offers a range of events, displays, and workshop choices. Most include a trade area with vendors who sell their products and services. Don’t look at this as just an opportunity to spend your money. Consider the value in the research and network aspects of it – meet new people, explore ideas, invest in your experience – it might open up doors to the future of your own writing career.

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