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Happily Ever After – Maybe Not…! Reblog

July 17, 2014
mandyevebarnett


reblogApologies for missing this re-blog yesterday – crisis required attention!

Please see the attached link for the original

http://thewritelife.com/cliches-avoid-4-story-endings-readers-will-hate/

I have placed the post here:

Writing a book is difficult, but crafting an ending that is both impactful and wraps the plot up beautifully is even more so.

You worked hard to create a beginning that grabbed your readers, so make sure to write an ending that lives up to the rest of your story. Relying on clichés will only leave your readers feeling disappointed and dissatisfied.

Stay away from these four cliché endings:

1. The happily ever after

What it is: All of the characters in your book live happily ever, with no hardships to bear. The hero defeats his foes and all of the plot twists are nicely tied up – perhaps a little unrealistically.

Why to avoid it: Life doesn’t necessarily end happily ever after, which makes this type of ending feel disingenuous. You want your readers to feel enthralled with your book so that they’ll want to share it with friends, read more of your work or even re-read your story. Real life isn’t perfect, so make sure that your book stays in the realm of realism.

2. The drawn-out dream

What it is: The drawn-out dream ending involves the main character waking up safe and sound in their bed, realizing that the entire plot has just been a dream.

Why to avoid it: This type of ending typically annoys readers, who feel that the author has copped out. A book should be emotional to everyone involved, and an author who uses this ending seems to betray readers’ trust and cheapen the emotions they’ve felt throughout the book.

3. The guilty hero’s monologue

What it is: When the hero finally defeats the bad guy or force, the reader is privy to her internal thoughts of regret or remorse. The monologue is supposed to show the character’s guilt at what she’s had to do and how it’s eating away at her. Even though the ending is happy, our hero must now live with the blood on her hands.

Why to avoid it: In general, writers should strive to show, not tell, readers what is happening in the book. By strongarming readers into feeling specific, manufactured emotions, you are taking away their freedom to experience the story in a way that is reflective of their background and experiences. Readers may feel they are being led to specific conclusions, and few enjoy the feeling of an author holding their hand throughout a book — especially the ending.

4. The lover’s life

What it is: This is a special twist on the happily ever after ending, in which the main character falls in love, sometimes for an unexplained or random reason. It shows that true love makes the world go ‘round and that all that happened in the course of the story was worth it.

Why to avoid it: Unrealistic endings tend to annoy readers. If a love interest is too sudden, it isn’t all that real. If it is unexplained, it leaves your characters lacking depth. The truth is that not everyone falls in love and lives happily ever after. The best endings are unique, somewhat realistic, and really make your readers think.

Thank you to Allison VanNest for allowing me to share this insightful post with you all.

Have you ever rewrote a novel’s ending? Care to share?

My alternate ending to Life in Slake Patch was due to persuasion from my writing group members. The original left my protagonist awaiting a trial’s outcome. The revision gave my readers a verdict.

 

Keeping On Track – A Writer’s Checklist…

May 21, 2014
mandyevebarnett


reblogToday’s re-blog is from Alec Nevala-Lee. Organzing our plot, character development, writing schedules and a myriad of other creative life demands, this list is well worth keeping.

http://nevalalee.wordpress.com/2014/05/20/a-writers-checklist/

How do you structure your writing time?

Do you have a checklist? Care to share?

Other checklist links:

http://www.be-a-better-writer.com/creative-writing-tips.html

http://www.writingforward.com/writing-tips/the-22-best-writing-tips-ever

 

 top-10-list

 

Freelance Fright ~ Part I

April 30, 2014
mandyevebarnett


reblog

As a newbie to the freelance world, I so understand this…
Let you experiences in the comments. The more we share the more we learn and grow.

RiterRick

Before I get started, I’d like to answer an email received, the answer provided is a bit in depth, so bear with me as I take care of this:

Q:What do you do when you feel not so free when you’re freelancing writing?

A: I read

Thank you for your patience…


I freelance write when I have time. It’s not difficult and it brings in extra cash whenever I want. There’s always an array of topics available online. Something is bound to capture your interest. I can understand your hesitation. I hope this blog reaches out and calms those fears of freelancing.

Freelance writing is a versatile and competitive field. There are many subjects and just as many so called experts on the subjects. I compare freelancing to an auction. You spend hours placing bids on various ads. From there it’s the proverbial wait game. You click on your email…

View original post 483 more words

Strength In Female Characters & Keeping Their Clothes On…

April 9, 2014
mandyevebarnett


reblogToday’s reblog refers to female lead characters – some awesome advice and views on these blogs.

Have you got a strong female lead in your work?

How do you categorize her?

What traits did you want to show in her character?

Enjoy.

http://corsetsandcutlasses.wordpress.com/2014/03/26/how-to-create-strong-female-characters-in-historical-fiction/

http://corsetsandcutlasses.wordpress.com/2014/04/02/on-writing-strong-female-characters-make-them-human/

 http://ginablaxill.wordpress.com/2014/03/09/what-makes-a-strong-female-character/

Amelia_Earhart,_circa_1928Amelia Earhart – a true hero

Modern day female heroes tend to be portrayed in scantily clad costumes and yearning for a male counterpart – is this really necessary? Can’t women characters be strong, confident and capable without having to be ‘frail’ in some way?

Katniss_EverdeenKatniss Everdeen – make believe hero

What is your view?

 

 

 

Re-Blog Wednesday – Attracting Blog Traffic…

January 15, 2014
mandyevebarnett


reblog

http://dailypost.wordpress.com/2014/01/09/writing-great-post-titles/

Attracting Traffic: Tips for Writing Great Blog Post Titles

by Krista on January 9, 2014

You’ve been working hard on your blog: you put thought and effort into your About page, your site title and tagline, and you’ve even picked a funky blog name. You sweat your photography. You read and re-read your drafts to make sure they’re just so.

With over 1.4 million posts published on WordPress.com every day, how do you make sure your work stands out in the crowd? Crafting strong post titles is one way to snag reader attention, pique interest, attract followers, and earn repeat visits. Here’s a few ideas to think about as your write titles for your posts.

Photo by ullrich.c  (CC BY-SA 2.0)

Photo by ullrich.c (CC BY-SA 2.0)

GET ORIGINAL

There are plenty of posts like What Game of Thrones Taught me About Modern Society or Everything I know about Marriage, I Learned from Homer Simpson in the world today.

How many listicles have you seen recently? You know what I’m talking about: 10 Signs Millennials Will Ruin the World, or 15 Ways to Tell if You Really Are a Hipster. Sure, these types of headlines have become commonplace on the web and we too enjoy a funny listicle now and again. If you want your work to stand out from the crowd, you might want to rethink these types of constructions, unless you feel you’ve got a piece that transcends the genre. And in that case, we can’t wait to read it.

STUDY THE MASTERS

Chances are, there’s title inspiration and guidance in the blogs and magazine articles you’re already reading. Are there a few sites or magazines that you really like? Study their titles. Consider what it is about these titles that draws you in.

What captured your attention? What tickled your curiosity? Try emulating your favorite authors when you write post titles. Me? I admire Maria Popova‘s title writing style over at Brain Pickings. Never trite, always enticing, Maria’s posts always end up in my Instapaper account for later brain feeding. Here’s a few Brain Pickings post titles that caught my attention:

LEAD WITH THE END IN MIND

If you’re writing to educate, be it to share a personal anecdote or offer hard-won advice, it’s good to ask yourself: What’s the most important thing I want my reader to remember from reading this post? Crafting the answer into a post title automatically reinforces your most important point for the reader, making sure your message not only gets heard, but remembered.

Try creating intrigue or using the element of surprise with titles by alluding to something readers can only see or learn by reading the post. Consider Maria Popova’s headline above, J.R.R. Tolkien’s Little-Known, Gorgeous Art. Right away, I’m surprised — One of my favorite authors — Bilbo Baggins‘ daddy no less — was not only a writer, but also an artist? This piece of new information makes me want to follow that link and find out about Tolkien’s works of art.

BONUS: HOW DO GOOGLE, TWITTER, AND FACEBOOK SEE IT?

Your post’s title automatically becomes your post’s slug, which is part of the permanent link or URL to your post.

If your post title is fairly long, (over six or seven words) consider editing your slug to remove words such as “to,” “from,” “our,” “this,” “that,” etc., that don’t specifically relate to the post’s topic, for speedier search engine parsing. For example, this post’s slug would have been:

/attracting-traffic-tips-for-writing-great-blog-post-titles

I shortened the slug to the following to put the emphasis on the main idea: writing great post titles.

/writing-great-post-titles

If you’ve got your blog automatically connected to push and tweet posts to Facebook and Twitter, post titles are what gets sent out as a default via Publicize, so it’s important to consider how your post’s title might be perceived when it appears on your social networks.

As you write your piece, you may also want to think about the words readers will use to search for your post and ensure those words get a place in the title.

AND NOW, OVER TO YOU

Writing enticing titles is not only an art form, it takes a bit of practice. In your blogging experience, what have you found most effective when it comes to blog post titles? Share your tips with the class in the comments.

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