Mandy Eve-Barnett's Official Blog

Inspiration for Writers & Building A Community ©

My Homage to a Favorite Author…

December 13, 2013
mandyevebarnett


Homage – definition: something that shows respect or attests to the worth or influence of another

stephen_king

Most of you know I am a great Stephen King fan. Even though, to date, I have not written a horror novel, Stephen’s skillful writing has inspired me. Although, at the time I had no idea who had written the story, I went to view Carrie (the original) with teen friends one evening. I was so captivated by the movie I went back to the cinema the next afternoon alone to watch it again. That is powerful. Decades later shortly before boarding a plane for a nine hour flight, I browsed through the airport terminal’s book store and picked up the thickest book I could find. The blurb was intriguing. The book was The Stand. Not only did I read this book on the flight but for most of my vacation. I found it almost impossible to put down. Since then, I have re-read The Stand several times. Once I found Stephen’s work, I bought every single issue and impatiently awaited a new book. He could not write and publish fast enough (poor man!) Then I found Richard Bachman was a pen name and this gave me more books to purchase and read veraciously.

I think Stephen’s skill is taking a basic fear and developing it into a realistic story of human emotions and courage. If you have not read The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon, I encourage you to. This novel is basically one character and superbly written. To be able to master writing Stephen has quoted:  “Read and write four to six hours a day. If you cannot find the time for that, you can’t expect to become a good writer.” He sets out each day with a quota of 2000 words and will not stop writing until it is met. He also has a simple definition for talent in writing: “If you wrote something for which someone sent you a check, if you cashed the check and it didn’t bounce, and if you then paid the light bill with the money, I consider you talented.”

Stephen’s fifty novels (and counting) have sold over 350 million copies…I would be happy with a fraction of that figure. For those interested : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stephen_King

I do read other authors and genres, which include James Long and Kate Morton. Every author who resonates with me are skillful with their characters, locations and plot.

Who are your inspirations?

Do you write the same genre or others?

This house is part of a series of drawings on Stephen’s headed notepaper. My letter from Stephen is my most prized possession.

English: Stephen King's House in Bangor, Maine

English: Stephen King’s House in Bangor, Maine (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Is a Pseudonym a Good Thing or Not..?

May 5, 2013
mandyevebarnett


Pseudonym – definition: a fictitious name used by a writer to conceal his or her identity : a pen name

What do you think? Is this a good idea or not? My own pen name is actually a combination of my given names so not really a pseudonym in the true sense of the word. Many ‘famous’ authors have used pen names, some to experiment with another genre or to avoid a misconception by their readers. Using initials can ‘hide’ the true gender of a writer – well for a time anyway. But is it really a practice required in this day and age?

stephen-king

Let’s look at Stephen King (yes I know – but he’s my hero!) King used the pen name Richard Bachman for seven short novels in the late 1970’s, early 1980’s. There are two trains of thought about why he did this. 1) He wanted to find out if he could replicate his success to ensure it was not an accident or 2) the publishing standards only allowed a single book per year. As a prolific writer the restriction must have been very frustrating. (If only we could be so lucky)

English: Portrait of Charlotte Bronte by J. H....

English: Portrait of Charlotte Bronte by J. H. Thompson Русский: Портрет Шарлотты Бронте работы Дж. Х. Томпсона (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

A pseudonym was also used to hide gender when society dictated a woman’s role, such as Charlotte Bronte, writing under Currer Bell while Emily Bronte used Ellis Bell. Another surprise pen name is George Orwell, whose Nineteen Eighty-Four and Animal Farm caused such a sensation in the 1940’s. He was actually named Eric Arthur Blair. More recently Joanne Rowling used J.K. Rowling in an attempt to attract boy readers. It was thought if they perceived the author to be male they would be more likely to read the books about the young wizard.Is this really the case? Do you have a pen name? What were your reasons for using one?
Related articles

P.S. No Sunday Snippets today from me but please pop over to:

http://mermaidssinging.wordpress.com/

http://caitlinsternwrites.wordpress.com/

http://ileandrayoung.com

http://jennykellerford.wordpress.com

http://jennifermeaton.com/

http://richardleonard.wordpress.com

http://jordannaeast.com

http://letscutthecrap.wordpress.com

http://itsjennythewren.wordpress.com/

http://wehrismypen.wordpress.com

http://jlroeder.wordpress.com

https://mandyevebarnett.com/

http://www.michellezieglerauthor.com

http://joeowensblog.wordpress.com/

Blog at WordPress.com.