Tag Archives: screen writing

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A Superb Complicated Character…


Maunder – definition: 1. to talk in a rambling, foolish, or meaningless way; 2. to move, go, or act in an aimless, confused manner

As a long time viewer of Dr. Who, I could not miss the 50 year celebrations of this fantastic time traveler show this weekend. I don’t mind admitting that I have watched every single Doctor from Hartnell to Smith. For any show to last such a long time, is in a large par,t because of the excellent writing. To have a character time traveling is one thing but this one can morph into new forms, ensuring the viewer is continually engaged with their personalities. Each reincarnation has his own character traits and some were more rambling in their diction than others. The story lines and monsters are obviously a major part of the show as well and the writers have managed to keep us guessing what they will create next.

Dr Who

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doctor_(Doctor_Who)

Everyone has their favorite Doctor or Doctors. Some are memories of episodes when they were children and others when as adults they can appreciate the complexity of the time traveling hero and his Tardis.

As a writer, I only think it fair to highlight the writers who have made us scream, hide behind the sofa and puzzle over the complexities of each episode. The attention to detail and back story makes each episode so ‘real’ that we are aware of the monster’s motivation and await the Doctor’s solution with avid anticipation.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Doctor_Who_writers

I salute these writers for their ingenuity and excellent writing. This quote says it all:

Douglas Adams, who was a Doctor Who writer of huge renown, said the show had to be complicated enough for children and simple enough for adults, and that still holds true, I think. The target audience is everybody from 6 to 106,” he continued. “You want it to be exciting and thrilling and have a lot of different takes to it. You want it to be emotional, and have great characters, and you also want it to be self-contained: within 45 minutes, you’re having to land on a planet, or a period of history, meet a whole bunch of people, solve a mystery, have an adventure and get back in the TARDIS — and with jokes, and you can’t afford to do any of it. That’s why it’s one of the hardest shows to write for, but when you even come close to getting it right, it’s the most exciting show in the world to write for.”

Source: http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/heat-vision/writers-explain-why-doctor-who-659103

Dalek