Tag Archives: Sherlock Holmes

Genres of Literature – Crime Fiction


CFF Logo black no strapline

Crime fiction fictionalizes a multiple of crimes from murder to kidnapping to extortion. The narratives relay how the criminal gets caught, and the repercussions of the crime as well as their detection, the criminals, and their motives. It is usually distinguished from mainstream fiction such as historical fiction or science fiction, however, the boundaries are indistinct. Crime fiction has multiple sub-genres which include detective fiction or whodunits. courtroom dramas, hard-boiled fiction and legal thrillers.  Most crime fiction deals with the crime’s investigation rather than the court room. Suspense and mystery are key elements nearly ubiquitous to the genre. 

Crime Fiction was recognized as a distinct literary genre in the 19th century with specialists writers and a devoted readership. Earlier novels typically did not have the modern systematic attempts at detection: with no detective or indeed police trying to solve the case but rather more mystery in context. Such as a ghost story, a horror story, or a revenge story. The ‘locked room; mystery was a precursor to the detective stories. The most famous of course is Arthur Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes, whose mental deductions and astute observations led him to the culprits. Two other notable authors in this ‘new’ genre were Agatha Christie and Dorothy L Sayers.  

 

  • Detective fiction
  • Cozy Mystery
  • Whodunit
  • Historical whodunit
  • Locked room whodunit
  • Locked room mystery
  • Police procedural
  • Forensic
  • Legal thriller
  • Spy novel
  • Caper story
  • Psychological thriller
  • Parody or spoof

Each one commonly has a lot of suspense, hidden clues, a charismatic detective and an elusive criminal. The genre continues to develop with character analysis, covering specific themes, LGBT crimes and police investigation themes.

Have you written crime fiction? 

Which sub-genre do you write?

Why not share a link?

 

Genres of Literature – Mystery


Mystery_fiction

 

Mystery literature deals with the solution of a crime or the unraveling of secrets. Any scenario that is kept secret or remains unexplained or unknown.

The most common scenario for this genre usually involves a mysterious death or a crime to be solved. It focuses on a closed circle of suspects, with each suspect having a credible motive and also reasonable opportunity for committing the crime. A detective is the main character, who will eventually solve the mystery by logical deduction from facts fairly presented to the reader. However, sometimes mystery books are non-fictional. “mystery fiction” can be detective stories but the emphasis is on the actual puzzle or suspense element with its logical solution revealed later, such as in whodunit’s.

Due, in part, to the lack of true police forces prior to the 1800’s, mystery fiction was unheard of.  Many towns only had constables or a night watchman at best. As populations grew in towns and cities, police forces were institutionalized, and detectives employed – thus formulating the mystery novel.

The most famous mystery sleuth was of course Sherlock Holmes. The novels and subsequent movies and TV shows have delighted audiences for generations.

Do you write mystery novels?

What or who is your favorite mystery sleuth story?

 

 

 

Meet Sherlock Holmes and Maybe Other Literary Heroes in the Future…


Sherlock

Recently I enjoyed the Harry Potter Exhibition (see here: https://mandyevebarnett.com/2014/02/03/creating-monsters-to-delight-and-scare/) so was intrigued to see an article advertising a touring exhibition for Sherlock Holmes. This is an exciting concept for Sir Arthur Conan Doyle enthusiasts. The exhibition will tour until 2017.

See the following links.

http://www.nytimes.com/slideshow/2014/03/20/arts/artsspecial/20140320-SHERLOCK.html?_r=0

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/03/20/arts/artsspecial/entering-world-of-literatures-great-sleuth.html

This tour raises the question, will all literary heroes have their own exhibtions in the future? We could enjoy the intricacies of our favorite characters in a tangible, hands on way. Would the exhibitions remain excellent or would the promoters begin to get on the bandwagon? These exhibitions are not cheap to devise, create or transport thus ticket prices will remain high. Hopefully the quality will not suffer as more tours are created.

Which character or characters would you like t0 ‘meet’?

Holmes

Today’s quotes have tobe from Sherlock himself of course.

“The world is full of obvious things which nobody by any chance ever observes.”

Sherlock Holmes -The Hound of the Baskervilles

‘You see, but you do not observe. The distinction is clear.’

Sherlock Holmes  -A Scandal in Bohemia

Our prompt will be a crime mystery sentence to draw your reader in.

My response:  With quivering hand, she plunged the knife deep into flesh.

Happy Writing!