Tag Archives: technology

Writing Hub -Books, Writing, Tips & more…


writing-hub

Writing:

As most of you know I take advantage of any opportunity to write. On Monday, I wrote several chapter summaries and two whole chapters for my ghost writing project. Great you say – however my location was rather usual – in the waiting area of Canadian Tire – as my new tires/tyres were fitted! Luckily I was the only one who took advantage of this space so was not interrupted.

Other writing during our long Thanksgiving weekend was a blog post for Monday and agendas for my writers group AGM Tuesday and Arts Council Board meeting on Thursday.

I also practiced reading aloud for my event today – Fall into Romance at Audreys Books, Jasper Avenue, Edmonton.

22135695_1433038260108109_653462194528697166_o

I even got some writing done prior to the AGM as it was close to my local library! Another 647 words – not great but good.

What did you do with your long weekend – Canadian authors?

Books:

A Desperate Fortune

Well this was a delight – two time periods, lots of wonderfully well-rounded characters, a superb plot, a glimpse at how life is affected by Asperger’s and intrigue throughout.

I recommend this book to everyone! We travel through France and Italy, experience the trials of two women in two eras and how their surroundings and the people around them take their toil.

And for #writers this link is great. https://www.helpingwritersbecomeauthors.com/book-storystructure/a-desperate-fortune/

Now onto:

blood games

Followed by:

chronicles

Writing Tips:

Set a timer for forty-five minutes, then take a fifteen minute break

Find three trusted readers, not just one

A Writers Conundrum – Finding Time to Write..


To have inspiration for our writing we must observe life, to avoid our family and friends abandoning us we need to engage with them, to pay the bills we must usually work a day job, to maintain our word count or deadline we must organize writing time. So the question is, how can we juggle all of these demands on our time with failing at each one?

Finding the ‘perfect’ balance between these is always a challenge. You may be in the depths of a scene when a small hand lands on your lap, a teenager ‘must’ be taken to a friends house, your husband needs help with a project or dare I say it your boss needs something from you? We inevitably crumble and leave the narrative in the hope you will remember the details later? We may scramble to jot down that idea, phrase or even paragraph before being torn away. I have looked to other writers, famous or not, and tried to delve beyond the obvious and gleam an insight into their methods of finding time. There are numerous hints and tips populating the internet but in the end you know your life and its limitations best. You may get up extra early, stay awake until the breaking dawn or cram a few paragraphs into your lunch hour – whatever works for you and your writing – is the right way to go. The trick is how to organize your time productively.

How do you schedule your writing?

What time of day works best for you?

I have to admit my writing is not scheduled. I take advantage of any time I’m left alone and once absorbed find it difficult to let go. Weekend mornings are good for me as I get up early and have several hours while my daughter is still sleeping and my husband is playing about in the garage! Other times I can use are the evenings when I arrive early for writing group meetings and write until the allotted time. Other ‘escape’ opportunities do arise and I always take advantage of them: a cancelled appointment, the house to myself or the glory of a  writing retreat! Obviously, I dream of the day I can shut myself away with my laptop and not have to answer to anyone…it will happen I just need to be patient.

With my freelance work increasingly demanding more of my time, I have to split my writing with that of clients. Maybe I am wrong but I tend to complete a client’s work prior to my own. Having a deadline for a paying job and completing it is, to my mind, more important and vital: a) for repeated work b) for remuneration. That is not to say I believe my own writing is secondary, far from it. Within my writing group, Writers Foundation of Strathcona County, I am fortunate to have other writers who engage in an annual novel workshop. At the beginning of the year, when several of us have participated in NaNoWriMo and others are ready to share their first draft, we meet every month until June (sometimes longer). We section our novels and email them to each other, then edit and comment on the narrative. Then at month’s end email our editing and meet to discuss the stories. It is beta reading within a ‘safe’ environment if you will. This mutual assistance enables me to edit my current manuscript with the views of several other authors and a ‘faster’ editing process too.

Care to share your writing schedule or tips you found useful?

My writing area expands a little each year! Where do you write?

New Writing DEsk 003new writing deskPicture Wall

Tailor Make Your Writing Schedule To Your Life…


In a perfect world we would be able to write whenever and where ever we chose. However, life gets in the way all too often. Many of us have to juggle family commitments and a ‘day’ job while writing. Finding the ‘perfect’ balance between these is always a challenge. You may be in the depths of a scene when a small hand lands on your lap, a teenager ‘must’ be taken to a friends house, your husband needs help with a project or dare I say it your boss needs something from you? We inevitably crumble and leave the narrative in the hope you will remember the details later? We may scramble to jot down that idea, phrase or even paragraph before being torn away.

juggling

 I have looked to other writers, famous or not, and tried to delve beyond the obvious and gleam an insight into their methods of finding time. There are numerous hints and tips populating the internet but in the end you know your life and its limitations best. You may get up extra early, stay awake until the breaking dawn or cram a few paragraphs into your lunch hour – whatever works for you and your writing – is the right way to go. The trick is how to organize your time productively. I came across this interesting post and thought it was worth sharing.

http://thejennymacbookblog.wordpress.com/2014/08/13/punch-clock/

How do you schedule your writing?

What time of day works best for you?

I have to admit my writing is not scheduled. I take advantage of any time I’m left alone and once absorbed find it difficult to let go. Weekend mornings are good for me as I get up early and have several hours while my daughter is still sleeping and my husband is playing about in the garage! Other times I can use are the evenings I arrive early for writing group meetings and write until the allotted time. Obviously, I dream of the day I can shut myself away with my laptop and not have to answer to anyone…it will happen I just need to be patient.

Care to share your writing schedule or tips you found useful?

writing desk 1

 

Self Publishing – Circumventing the Traditional Option..?


Circumvent – definition: to avoid by artfulness or deception; avoid by anticipating or outwitting

Self-publishing-vs-traditional-publishing

The argument of choosing traditional publishing versus self publishing continues to be discussed at length on many social media sites. The option to release your novel into the world without waiting months or even years for a traditional publishing house to pick it up, has revolutionized the authoring world  and our options within it. There are still pitfalls as well as concerns about the quality with self published works, but on the whole it is seen as a great opportunity by many struggling authors.

A twist in the tale is now emerging, where self published authors are being approached by the traditional houses – some accept, some do not. Again there are advantages and disadvantages – drastic reduction in royalties, publicity coverage, cover design,  prestigious outlets, contractual restrictions or conditions.

Even some famous authors  utilized the self publishing route, it is not a ‘new’ concept by any means.

  •  Mark TwainHuckleberry Finn
  •  John GrishamA Time to Kill
  •  L. Ron HubbardDianetics
  •  Irma RombauerThe Joy of Cooking
  •  Walt WhitmanLeaves of Grass
  •  Richard Paul EvansThe Christmas Box
  •  Jack Canfield and Mark Hensen,Chicken Soup for the Soul
  •  James RedfieldThe Celestine Prophecy
  •  Beatrix Potter, creator of the Peter Rabbit Classic Series.

Today’s indie authors have the added advantage of using technology to realize their publishing dreams and at a greatly reduced cost. There are numerous sites advertising publishing options and this is where care needs to be taken. Research each one thoroughly and get personal recommendations from other authors, not from the website! Unfortunately, some sites are preying on inexperienced authors and charging a great deal of money for ‘services’.  Always check http://www.sfwa.org/other-resources/for-authors/writer-beware/  they have a list that is constantly updated of sites to avoid.

How do you view self publishing?

What do you feel are the advantages for traditional versus self-publishing?

SelfpubvsTradpub

 

Related Articles:

http://www.novel-writing-help.com/publishing-a-novel.html

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/holly-robinson/should-you-self-publish-f_b_3721206.html

The Downside of Publishing..?


Nullify – definition: to cancel; to render or declare legally void or inoperative.

invalidate

In lawvoid means of no legal effect. An action, document or transaction, which is void is of no legal effect whatsoever: an absolute nullity — the law treats it as if it had never existed or happened.

As writers, we have to deal with multiple aspects of the writing journey. Once we have ‘finished’ writing our manuscript there is the editing and revision to tackle, followed by feedback from beta readers and more revision. Researching venues to place our story is next on the agenda. Do we self-publish or submit to traditional publishers? If we do find a publisher and they accept our work what is the next step? Well, it’s probably reading a contract with the compulsory small print. I am not, in any way, qualified to give advice on this particular subject. However, I did find some interesting links that discuss the downside of some contracts. The first link is from a site I regularly visit – Writer Beware.

http://accrispin.blogspot.ca/2011/06/getting-out-of-your-book-contract-maybe.html

http://savvybookwriters.wordpress.com/2013/08/15/less-than-minimum-wage-for-authors/

http://savvybookwriters.wordpress.com/2013/08/16/the-traps-in-publishing-contracts/

http://jakonrath.blogspot.ca/2012/05/unconscionability.html

http://www.theguardian.com/books/2013/jan/10/joe-simpson-publisher-ebook-royalties

I suggest getting legal counsel of some kind to read through any contract. The legalese is more than the average person can handle anyway.

Do you have a contract experience you can share?