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Author Interview – Yvonne Rediger

January 22, 2019
mandyevebarnett


AuthorInterview

Yvonne Rediger

What inspired your latest novel?

Death and Cupcakes is a combination of cozy mystery, with a touch of romance, humour and yep, baking.                                        

How did you come up with the title?

Death and Cupcakes just came to me when I was writing Jane Westcott’s background.

Death and Cupcakes

Is there a message in your novels that you want readers to grasp?

Yes, don’t wait for happiness to come to you. No one is going to give it to you, so take charge of your life, and find it. And, don’t let your past haunt you.

How much of the book is realistic?

There really is a Musgrave Landing on Salt Spring Island. However, the place only has a handful of homes and a boat dock, but no ferry. The geography is correct, and we do have many small towns and villages serviced by ferries which also have a cafe located close to the wharf.

Are your characters based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

No, my characters are made up, although I will use a name from a friend or family member. In this novel, the female RCMP officer in Death and Cupcakes is a composite of several officers I’ve met in Duncan, at Coffee with a Cop and my great aunt, who passed away a short while ago. Auntie Lea rode a Honda Gold Wing, could handle a snow machine. She ran the farm, raised a family, and had a big heart. I always told her I wanted to grow up to be just like her.

Where can readers find you on social media and do you have a blog?

I have a Facebook Author and website, and am active on social media.

Website: http:/www.yvonnerediger.com

Facebook Page: Yvonne Rediger – Author

Twitter: @blackyvy, Instagram: @blackyvy50

Do you have plans or ideas for your next book? Is it a sequel or a stand alone?

Certainly, Death and Cupcakes is book one of the Musgrave Landing Mysteries. Book two is my work in progress, Fun with Funerals.

Of the characters you have created or envisioned, which is your favorite & why?

Arlie Birch is my favorite character in this novel. He is over sixty-five and says and does exactly as he pleases, so he adds humor to the book. He also has a heart of gold.

hell cat
Do you favor one type of genre or do you dabble in more than one?

I write another series, VIC Shapeshifters, Urban Fantasy / Paranormal Romance set on Vancouver Island. These books also have a mystery element as well as magic and romance. Hell Cat is book two of this series and was just released in December too, just after Death and Cupcakes. It starts out in Edmonton and ends up on Vancouver Island.

Trusting the Wolf, book three is set to release in summer of 2019.

Do you plan your stories, or are you a seat of the pants style writer?

I am a planner/pantser. Once I have the outline completed and broken down into the chapters, I am off and running. Sometimes a better idea will come along and I will go back to the beginning of the novel to incorporate it.

What is your best marketing tip?

Youtube book trailers. I made one for each new book which was released in December.

Hell Cat – https://youtu.be/EDjWI5i-UTw

Death and Cupcakes – https://youtu.be/CRPWtaso8ac

Not only were these fun to create, but now I have a succinct method of sharing the gist of the stories on different platforms.

Do you find social media a great tool or a hindrance?

Social media can be both. I don’t blog more than once or twice a month. I don’t seem to find the time. Snippets from the books, release dates, and fun stuff are found mostly on my Facebook Author page.

OPTIONAL QUESTIONS

What do you enjoy most about writing?

The puzzle solving. Characters and plot, making all the pieces fit together.

What age did you start writing stories/poems?

I wrote my first fan fiction short stories when I was eleven. Star Trek was a favourite.

Has your genre changed or stayed the same?

I keep adding new ones. I started writing romance, then paranormal and urban fantasy. Later, romantic suspense and now cozy mysteries.

What genre are you currently reading?

Tanya Huff, A Peace Divided

Do you read for pleasure or research or both?

Both, I love learning new things, especially history or the origin of a subject. If it’s wrapped in a good story, all the better.

Who is your best supporter/mentor/encourager?

My biggest supporters are my husband and children and their spouses. My daughter, her husband, and my son have provided background detail in a number of books with regard to their expertise. My daughter-in-law actually painted the cover for Hell Cat. My sister is the creator of the cozy art in the book trailers. The rest of my family is always supportive too.

As for mentors, I have many wonderful people in my writing and author groups who are generous with their time and advice. I’ve also learned a lot from some great editors.

Where is your favorite writing space?

In winter, I have a wicker rocking chair and ottoman in the dining room facing a big window which overlooks the mountains. In summer, my backyard patio is my favourite.

Do you belong to a writing group? If so which one?

Yes, VIRA on Vancouver Island, we have over sixty members and meet monthly. Each September we put on a full day workshop with an invited facilitator. We’ve had Shannon Mayer, Susan Wiggs, this year, Eileen Cook. I am also a member of several groups on Facebook. I also help out at the Cowichan Valley Writers, for new writers, by sharing my experience and teach a workshop or two.

If you could meet one favorite author, who would it be and why?

Linwood Barclay, I love his sense of humor. I’ve used GoodReads Ask the Author, to ask him questions and permission to use his name in Death and Cupcakes. He agreed and was very supportive.

If you could live anywhere in the world – where would it be?

Right where I am.

Do you see writing as a career?

I’ve been full time at it since 2015, written six books in that time. Four are published, two more coming this year.

Do you nibble as you write? If so what’s your favorite snack food?

Nope, even my coffee gets cold when I’m writing. Now when I’m editing, that is a whole other thing. Cookies, I am a sucker for homemade cookies.

What reward do you give yourself for making a deadline?

Dinner out at one of our favorite restaurants, like The Shipyard, Friday night, because there is live music and dancing after dinner.

Thank you for having guest on your blog Mandy!

More books from Yvonne.

 

Author Interview – Kelsey Barthel

December 21, 2018
mandyevebarnett


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  1. Does writing energize or exhaust you? Depends on more easy the ideas and writing is flowing. If everything is flowing nicely and i’m forming an idea that makes me proud, writing gives me a powerful high that makes me super bubbly. If I’m having a hard time, like when you’re trying so hard just to write ANYTHING because you’re trying to power through a block. That digs at my soul.
  2. What is your writing Kryptonite? Getting distracted by TV or movies.
  3. Did you ever consider writing under a pseudonym? Not at the moment.
  4. What other authors are you friends with, and how do they help you become a better writer? I’ve connected with a lot of authors online but I haven’t connected to any of them outside of that. The ones I’ve met online have helped in so many ways. They have given me a like-minded community to bounce ideas off of and give feedback. Some of them were my beta readers for Beyond the Code.
  5. Do you want each book to stand alone, or are you trying to build a body of work with connections between each book? I have some book ideas that are going to develop into expansive series but for the most part they stand on their own.
  6. What was the best money you ever spent as a writer? I am still very new on the writer scene so I haven’t made much of any money yet. Fingers crossed.
  7. What was an early experience where you learned that language had power? From an early age, language and writing always gave me an outlet for my crazy imagination. It was a great way to bring my thoughts into the world and helped me sort out a lot of my feelings.
  8. What’s your favorite under-appreciated novel? To Kill a Mockingbird. A lot of people I talk to don’t like it but I thought it was a very thought provoking read.
  9. As a writer, what would you choose as your mascot/avatar/spirit animal? A fox. I love foxes

BeyondTheCode

10. How many unpublished and half-finished books do you have? I have a bunch of story ideas and a couple of them I have started writing but Beyond the Code was actually the first book I wrote fully.

11. What does literary success look like to you? Seeing my book on the shelf at a bookstore.

12. What kind of research do you do, and how long do you spend researching before beginning a book? I am a thorough planner when it comes to my books. I plan out all the events in order for the book, do all the research necessary, and start writing. I try my best to make it as authentic as possible.

13. How many hours a day/week do you write? As much as I can but life gets in the way a bit more than I would prefer.

14. How do you select the names of your characters? Sometimes the name just comes to me when I’m making the character but most of the time I use a baby naming book.

15. What was your hardest scene to write? Emotionally, there’s a scene in the book I’m writing now that deals with a character letting go of a future that she can’t have. But there was another scene in Beyond the Code where there was a lot of characters involved in a fight scene and keeping track of all of them was pretty difficult.

16. Why did you choose to write in your particular field or genre?  If you write more than one, how do you balance them? So far, I’ve just been writing urban fantasy. I chose it because I love the idea of putting extraordinary things in the mundane world.

17. How long have you been writing? I started writing short stories when I was around 10 and have been doing that off and on throughout my teen years and started seriously putting myself into it when I move out.

18. What inspires you? Anime, comic books, and movies.

19. How do you find or make time to write? Sometimes you just have to put aside things you enjoy to get the words out. It can be hard but sometimes I have to be my own hard ass boss.

20. What projects are you working on at the present? Right now, I am working on a sequel to Beyond the Code.

21. What do your plans for future projects include? Trying to make Beyond the Code successful and get the sequel published.

22. Share a link to your author website.

www.beyondthecode.ca

Bio

Kelsey Rae Barthel grew up in the quiet town of Hay Lakes in Alberta, a sleepy place of only 500 people. Living in such a calm setting gave her a lot of spare time to imagine grand adventures of magic and danger, inspired by the comic books and anime she enjoyed. Upon graduating high school, Kelsey moved to Edmonton and eventually began working in the business of airline cargo, but she never stopped imagining those adventures. Beyond the Code is her first novel.

 

 

 

 

Author Interview Kelly Charron

March 9, 2018
mandyevebarnett


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Schmidt_Charron

  1. Does writing energize or exhaust you?

Usually writing energizes me. I absolutely love it. Even those moments when I’m exhausted from my day job, as soon as I force myself to dig in I’m so happy I did. I love to get lost in the worlds that I’ve created with characters that truly do surprise me.

  1. What is your writing Kryptonite?

If you mean what can deter me from writing, it’s being so tired that I can’t properly focus or having a migraine, which I unfortunately get too often. Creatively, I’m lucky that I don’t really have anything, except on the rare occasion when I’ll get stuck on a plot point (usually unsure where to go next in the story), but it usually means that my character isn’t doing the right thing for the story. I usually talk it through with my amazing writer friends and my husband, who has quickly become the best person to talk through plot with (and he’s not even a writer).

  1. How does having friends who are also authors help you become a better writer?

We keep each other accountable, talk through all of our issues on and off the page, and root for each other. No one else fully understands the highs and lows in this business, so it’s so comforting to have them. We critique each other’s work and have become our own little family over the years. We joke about starting a writing commune.

  1. Do you want each book you write to stand alone, or are you trying to build a body of work with connections between each book?

I have a few series on the go, but all my books share commonalities. I write gritty, dark stories that explore human motivation and how well you really know the people in your life. I have currently two books in The Pretty Wicked series published and I’m writing a YA witch urban fantasy that’s a ton of fun. The Wicked books can be read as stand-alone novels, though they do complement one another and the reader will get the full story arc if they read both. The YA series will be sequential and need to be read in order.

  1. What’s your favorite under-appreciated novel?

I recently read two books that I think people would love but don’t really know about. UNEARTHLY THINGS by Michelle Gagnon and THE SACRED LIES OF MINNOW BLY by Stephanie Oaks. They happen to both be YA books but they will be loved by all if given the chance. Unearthly Things is a modern reimagining of Jane Eyre complete with a creepy, haunted mansion, a misplaced orphan, a turbulent love story and dangerous liaisons. It’s great. The Scared Lies of Minnow Bly was so beautifully and hauntingly written that I was actually angry when it ended. I don’t even want to say anything more as to not ruin it. Go look them up.

  1. How many unpublished and half-finished books do you have?

I have two finished but unpublished novels, one half-finished book, and I’m currently completely replotting and reworking another novel that was complete but I realized was all wrong.

Wicked Fallout

  1. What kind of research do you do, and how long do you spend researching before beginning a book?

I do a ton of research. I read articles and books as well as watch documentaries and movies on the subjects I’m interested in. I’ve even travel and tour places when I’m able. I interview experts in the different fields I’m looking into/studying. I usually do a lot of heavy research before the bulk of my writing starts, but it continues throughout the writing of the book as other things arise.

  1. How many hours a day/week do you write?

Typically, I try and write or research 4-5 days a week anywhere from 1-4 hours per day. I work Mondays to Fridays so I cram in what I can in the evenings and on weekends. I’m also trying to get more reading in because I find it helps my own words flow a bit easier. It’s like a primer.

  1. How do you select the names of your characters?

I often look at baby name websites, though sometimes I look up the meanings of names and their ancestry to make sure it fits the character. I will also jot interesting names down in the notes section on my phone when I hear them. I work at a school with 600 kids, so that also helps.

  1. Why did you choose to write in your particular field or genre?  If you write more than one, how do you balance them?

I’m drawn to certain genres to read and by extension I want to write my own stories and create my own worlds in those genres. For me it’s thriller, horror, and urban fantasy. I love reading and watching some historical but refuse to research that much or I might delve into that. I’d love to write a gothic or Victorian horror—for that I might fall into the research hole.

I balance them by writing one at a time. I have friends that can write anywhere from two to five different books at once. I prefer to get lost in one world from start to finish. I get very focused so the only time I’ll veer off is if I’m editing, then I can split time writing something else.

  1. How long have you been writing?

I think this is year twelve or thirteen. Though I’ve had to take some huge breaks for various degrees I’ve gone back to school for. It’s difficult to keep up on school work and write for me.

  1. Share a link to your author website.

I love to connect with readers and writers. Here’s where you can find me:

Website: http://kellycharron.com

Twitter: https://twitter.com/KellyMCharron

Facebook: https://goo.gl/UNkH3g

Goodreads: https://goo.gl/rf4NlM

Pretty Wicked

13. What is Pretty Wicked about?

Pretty Wicked, is a mature YA novel that follows a fifteen-year-old girl named Ryann Wilkanson who has always known she’s a little different than most people. Early on she recognized that she had a darkness inside of her that she didn’t see in her friends or family members. She becomes obsessed with serial killers who she refers to as “The Greats” and decides that she wants to join their ranks. Lucky for Ryann, her father is a detective and she has made good use of her visits to the station, paying close attention so that she can get away with murder. In this series, Ryann is the protagonist while the detective hunting her, who also happens to be her father’s partner, is the antagonist.

14. What about the sequel, Wicked Fallout?

Wicked Fallout was a natural extension of the first book, though it takes place twelve years later and is classified as an adult novel. I didn’t feel ready to leave the characters and world behind and felt there was a lot more to the story that I wanted to explore including how possible it is for someone to change drastically as they mature, how well can you trust your own judgment and how all of your life’s experiences culminate to inform everything that you do. The book shares a point of view with Dr. Nancy Clafin, a forensic psychiatrist, who is hired by Ryann’s new and formidable defense team to evaluate her to determine if she should be released when new evidence comes to light.

Bio:

Kelly Charron is the author of YA and adult horror, psychological thrillers and urban fantasy novels. All with gritty, murderous inclinations and some moderate amounts of humor. She spends far too much time consuming true crime television (and chocolate) while trying to decide if yes, it was the husband, with the wrench, in the library. Kelly has a degree in English Literature as well as a Social Work degree. She has worked as a hairstylist, youth outreach worker and education assistant. She lives with her husband and cat, Moo Moo, in Vancouver, British Columbia.

 

Interview with N.M. Pondus…

March 14, 2013
mandyevebarnett


May I introduce N.M. Pondus, who wishes to keep his anonymity with an icon instead of a photo. His work is influenced by mythology and the standards of those era’s, which links to today’s word quite nicely. Probity – definition: honesty, uprightness.

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a)      Of the characters you have created or envisioned, which is your favorite & why? I definitely like my main character, Diomedes, the best. He was the inspiration for all my stories so far. I’ve always been a mythology and folklore nut and loved the heroes from Homer’s Odyssey, but we only hear about a few of them. The more I read and did research, the more I kept coming back to Diomedes, Son of Tydeus and King of Argos during the Trojan War. Most people never get beyond Achilles, but much more humble and just as capable was Diomedes, who, according to the stories was far more feared on the battlefield than any other Greek in the war. In fact, he is the only human ever to have wounded, not one, but two Immortals in battle—including Ares. He was fearless, and more importantly, incredibly intelligent on the battlefield, and he was the best fighter out there. He was also honorable and loyal.

Diomedes and Athena attacking Ares

Diomedes and Athena attacking Ares (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

His back story is awesome, too. At 15, he and a group of young men lead an army to restore the proper king to the throne of Thebes in the War of the Epigoni, the greatest war until Troy. They did what their fathers could not and it cemented his legacy. The coolest part of his story and the one that played best into the mythology of my stories is that he was so honorable in battle that Athena chose him as her champion at Troy and she granted him special abilities and powers to enable him to see and attack Immortals during battle. At the end of the war, Athena offered Diomedes immortality, but nothing is written much beyond some conflicting stories except he simply disappears over time. That was my cue: A human with the abilities to recognize non-human beings influencing and using humans for their own gains and strong enough to defend them. He’s also got a bit of me in him, too.

b)     Do you favor one type of genre or do you dabble in more than one? No, I’m pretty much Urban Fantasy all the way. I love to read all kinds of stuff, but I still head there first when I look for something to read. I love the myths and tales, but I also find great inspiration from our modern, real world.

header_white c)      What do you enjoy most about writing? I love weaving a story and developing characters. I really like those times when I’m doing research and I find things that seem unrelated at first, but then figure out some way to tie them together. I seriously enjoy using mythological reasons to explain unexplained real world events. And developing characters allows you to live outside of yourself for a bit. It’s all fun.

d)     Have you got a favorite place to write? You know I still write on a desktop-based computer so I write in my “office.” It’s actually a spare bedroom with a desk in it. I will say that I use my iPad to do all kinds of research though, which I will do when and wherever an idea strikes me.

e)      Do you plan your stories, or are you a seat of the pants style writer? The basic story line and framework is planned, but most of the details are seat of the pants. I know where I want to go, but not necessarily how I want to get there. Again, I do lots and lots of research on stuff, so I constantly get ideas that I want to incorporate and sometimes a perfect opportunity presents itself as I’m writing. It keeps me thinking.

f)       What inspires your stories? Partly my background and interests and partly pure imagination. Sometimes it’s more one than the other, but they all play a role. Originally, I was inspired by a crazy thought about creatures that could only be killed with specific weapons. Why wouldn’t a Barrett M107 firing Raufoss rounds not blow the living snot out of a vampire? It’d blow a hole through a cement wall at 1000 yards and still kill the guy on the other side of it. Simple physics would tell you that much energy would do some serious damage to anything, even if it didn’t kill it. Also, I’m a bit of a purist when it comes to myths and legends. I like things in their original forms, mostly because they were so much cooler. Now we change things to romanticize them or make them fit into a specific world, and we insist on using the same name for the creature. I’m sorry, but vampires just should not sparkle in the sunlight. I’m really big into accuracy and authenticity.

g)      What are you currently reading? A few books. I’m re-reading the Hobbit and I’ve been desperately trying to get through The Naked Edge by David Morrell. I’ve got a big list of books I want to read, but just haven’t yet though. I constantly re-read a lot of classics, too.

h)     Do you have any odd habits or childhood stories? I am an odd childhood story. My parents considered me the “good” one in the family. That’s odd enough. Other than my addiction to fly-fishing, I can’t think of any really bizarre stuff. I once threw up on our pizza at a Pizza Hut when I was little. In my defense, I was sick. I threw up on my younger brother, too. He slept below me in offset bunk beds.

i)        Do you have any pets? Always. Right now, I have a cat and a dog. The dog is a Shiba Inu named Typhon that thinks he’s a Cu Sith. The cat is named Nyx. See, lots of mythology there… and each aptly named.

Shiba Inu

j)       Do you belong to a writing group? If so which one? You know, I don’t. Writing to me is very private and painful at times and I choose to push through on my own. I have a small group of friends and family that support me and act as my Beta readers and I have an outstanding editor.k)     What age did you start writing stories/poems? Technically, not until my late 30s. I wrote academically for scientific journals for years through graduate school and then for magazines, but I never wrote fiction until recently. As a kid, I used to come up with all kinds of stories in my head though.

l)        Do you have a book published? If so what is it called & where can readers purchase it? Alas, not yet. I’m still in that search-for-a-publisher/agent phase, even though I’m just wrapping up my second story. You can still go to my website and read the first few chapters of the first book, Humanity’s Fist and see a description of the one I’m just finishing now, The Hanner Brid.

tumblr_mfyg8ewX6r1rk44vco1_250 m)   If you could meet one favorite author who would it be and why? I guess I would say Jim Butcher, author of Dresden Files series. His stories have been a major influence on me and he sounds much more fun and less uptight than so many other authors out there.

n)     If you could live anywhere in the world – where would it be? Anywhere my wife is… but someplace warm, near water would be good, too.

o)      What’s your favorite movie of all time? Oh, holy mackerel… a toss up between The Good, The Bad and The Ugly, Jaws, The Count of Monte Cristo (the newer one), and Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House.

p)     Where can readers find you and your blog? My website is www.nmpondus.com and it has links to my blog on it, but it’s also at nmpondus.tumblr.com or on twitter at @nmpondus. https://twitter.com/NMPondus

q)     Do you have plans or ideas for your next book? Of course! And even the one after that. I get so many ideas from so many weird places that I now keep track of them. It’ll stay in my same story line, with the same characters, just different problems and issues. The real world provides so much fodder for Urban Fantasy its almost unreal!

r)      Who is your best supporter/mentor/encourager? Easy–my wife. I’d never have been able to do this if not for her support and encouragement.

Interview with Jennifer Eifrig…

January 21, 2013
mandyevebarnett


Please welcome Jennifer Eifrig – a fantasy author with an eclectic mixture of inspirational resources hence the word link for today – Paradigm (pair-uh-dyme) Definition- 1) an example to showing how something is to be done : model : pattern: 2) a theoretical framework in a discipline of science within which theories, laws and experiments are formulated.

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a)      Of the characters you have created or envisioned, which is your favorite & why?

I’m very fond of all my characters, even (sometimes especially) the villains and the minor characters. Every one of them started from a real individual in mind, but grew beyond that person to become unique in his/her own right. I have to “become” each character in order to write him/her consistently and effectively.

Isadora is an inspiring heroine, in that she’s remarkably human. I love Max because of his suave snarkiness – when he’s got his game on; when he doesn’t, he’s also appealing in his vulnerability. Seth is terrific fun to write; I get to imagine being completely amoral and selfish. The ghost was really hard to write because I’m not normally a sociopathic homicidal maniac. Roger is a darling, and the ushabti are just terrific fun. They’re probably my favorite to write.

b)      Do you favor one type of genre or do you dabble in more than one?

Well, right now I’m doing strictly urban fantasy, because I need to finish the series. However, I’m tossing around some ideas for a steampunk story, and I may try some romance.

c)      What do you enjoy most about writing?

Believe it or not, I like the camaraderie. I participate in a weekly writers’ group and it’s the highlight of my week, usually. I also love my publisher’s author community. We’re separated by hundreds of miles and an ocean or two, but we’re in daily contact and share ideas, tips, and stories. Of course, all this fun can be a huge distraction from the grunt work of knocking out a 100,000+ pp novel, so I have to be careful not to forget to write!

d)     Have you got a favorite place to write?

I usually work in two places: my tiny “office” (really a drop-leaf desk) in the dining room, and in bed. Frankly, I think I do my best creative writing in bed, and my best grant writing at my desk. If I’m doing creative work (which does include some grant writing!) I need absolute quiet. I can’t have anybody else in the room. It’s unnerving and distracting.

e)      Do you plan your stories, or are you a seat of the pants style writer?

I wish I could say I have a really thorough chapter-by-chapter outline, but I don’t. However, I do know exactly where the story is going. I usually write in my head in large chunks either as I lie down at night or before I get up in the morning. I tell myself the story, and then it’s a matter of actually transcribing into text. I still discover things as I go along, however, and I really enjoy those moments when plot elements just fall magically into place and I realize, oh, that’s why I did such-and-such that way.

f)       What inspires your stories?

Right now, Egyptian mythology is the glue holding my stories together. I’ve been fascinated with Egyptology since second or third grade. However, because I love to see cross-cultural patterns, I’ve interrelated many belief systems into my fictional universe, and created what one of my critique partners called a Magical Theory of Everything. I’m even going to include theoretical physics in the third novel – things like dark matter and dark energy and the Higgs-Boson. To me, science, mythology, literature, history, and religion are all related aspects of one Big Truth. As one of my protagonists says, those of us who believe in Jesus have a big chunk of the puzzle figured out, but we’re all still looking for all of the pieces.

g)      What are you currently reading?

Right now I’m devouring A Discovery of Witches. It’s a giant geek fest of a book, and it’s reassuring to know that people can still write long novels and other people still read them. I’ve also been filling up on steampunk romance, for fun and because I hope to write some soon. In the non-fiction vein, I’m working my way through Feast of the Dead: New England’s Vampires and The Bible: A Bibliography. I’ll read anything to do with ethnography and archaeology as well.

h)      Do you have any odd habits or childhood stories?

Odd habits? Well, I suppose we all have them, but one weird thing is that I don’t need to look far for inspiration about magic in everyday life. I have this weird problem in that certain kinds of technology just freak out and refuse to work around me. Also, things on store shelves will just leap off when I walk past them. It’s really embarrassing. I can also go invisible when I’m in a restaurant or waiting in line. The waiters literally don’t see me. My husband won’t let me order the drinks in a bar, because we’d be waiting forever.

i)        Do you have any pets?

I have one elderly house rabbit, and my kids have a guinea pig and two frogs. We want a dog, but we have to wait until the rabbit passes. We can’t have cats because my husband is allergic.

j)        Do you belong to a writing group? If so which one?

I’ve belonged to a writing group since 2009, and I give the group complete credit for enabling me to finish and publish my novel. I probably would never have done it without them. We meet almost weekly, and we’ll critique chapters, synopses, and queries. We’re completely and occasionally painfully honest, but if you can make it past your ego you’ll end up with a better novel. Our members have come and gone, but we’ve completed at least five novels that I’m aware of, and published two.

k)      What age did you start writing stories/poems?

I think I’ve always written in my head, but I didn’t write novels until high school. There, I wrote stories by hand that featured my friends as characters. It was a geeky thing to do, but I was a minor celebrity at the lunch table. People couldn’t wait for the next installment. After that, I didn’t write creatively for a long, long time, although I write grants, reports, letters, and web copy for a living. I started thinking about my novels in 2004, but as I said, I didn’t get serious about it until 2009.

Discovering Ren

l)        Do you have a book published? If so what is it called & where can readers purchase it?

I do! (proud grin) It’s called Discovering Ren, and was released for Kindle in December 2012 by Cogwheel Press. I’m currently waiting for the paperback edition with bated breath. You can purchase it on Amazon.

m)    If you could meet one favorite author who would it be and why?

Oh, it’s so hard to choose. I’m a huge fan of John Donne, and Will Shakespeare and their utterly brilliant use of language. I also love Boethius’s Consolation of Philosophy and would like to pick his brain. I thought Charles Palliser’s The Quincunx was the most enthralling novel I’ve ever read. I’d love to sit down with Jim Butcher and Joss Whedon over an endless supply of beer and talk shop.

The Quincunx of Time

The Quincunx of Time (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

n)      If you could live anywhere in the world – where would it be?

Again, so hard to answer because I’ve really not been to a lot of places. There’s a little village in the Swiss Alps that I visited a while back, and I’ve always said that if I were faced with something unspeakable, such as the loss of my entire family, I’d move there to get away. I’d love to see Egypt, and I should go to the UK to see all the places I learned about in college. Mostly, though, I just want to be wherever my husband and kids are.

  • o)      What’s your favorite movie of all time?

Ha! Good question. I think Casablanca is a Perfect Film, so maybe that one. However, I love the Brendan Frasier/Rachel Weisz The Mummy, and I’ll watch Bill Murray’s Groundhog Day whenever it’s on. By the way, Joss Whedon’s The Avengers is the best superhero movie ever made.

p)      Where can readers find you and your blog?

I’m available at www.jennifereifrigauthor.com. You can also find me on Goodreads, Amazon Author Central, FB (facebook.com/JenniferEifrigAuthor) and Twitter @ eifrigjen. I love, love, love hearing from other authors & readers, so please contact me!

q)      Do you have plans or ideas for your next book?

Sure do! I’m currently 107,000 words into the sequel for Discovering Ren, and I’m guessing the first draft will top out at 120,000, so I’m almost there. In this book, the husband of my last protagonist is the main character and POV, but there are lots of other voices, including that of the villain. He’s a homicidal sociopathic ghost.

r)       Who is your best supporter/mentor/encourager?

Without a doubt, my husband. He’s the best. He’s never said, “You’re crazy.” Instead, he gives me ideas, and he’s the best reader/critic there is. All I have to do is watch him read a draft, and I can tell from his facial expressions whether something works. He’s absolutely brilliant and has a revoltingly accurate memory for details. Once he hauled me out of the shower to ask if I’d researched a particular bottle of wine that a character was drinking, to be sure it matched the description I gave.

What a fun interview, full of surprises and intriguing insights. Thank you Jennifer.

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