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Imagination – A Writers Tool…

June 9, 2014
mandyevebarnett


articles
As writers we utilize our imaginations to make the unimaginable into reality in our narratives. There are no barriers, no limits to what we can create. Distant worlds, alternative realities and curious creatures are brought to life for our readers.

Our imaginations are a vital tool for our writing and we need to encourage it to flourish. We already ‘see’ things others may not even consider as story potential – such as a unique hairstyle, a particular speech pattern or even an outfit. Being able to incorporate things we see, hear and touch, no matter their original source, is how we create. Let your imagination free and enjoy the process of creation.

How do you ensure your imagination is not stifled? 

type writer imagine

It may seem rather ‘easy’ to create a whole new world, but in actual fact there are numerous hurdles we need to jump, metaphorically speaking. Fantasy readers, in particular, are extremely meticulous in their review and the consistency in fantasy works and the ‘laws’ of the land therein. This fact is obvious when you see the amount of sci-fi conventions and the followers of such programs as Star Trek.

 

 

This Q&A page is a great way to find out if your creation will stand up to scrutiny.

http://www.sfwa.org/2009/08/fantasy-worldbuilding-questions/

And a great link for tips on world building here:

http://www.malindalo.com/2012/10/five-foundations-of-world-building/

Of course world building is not restricted to fantasy. If you are setting your narrative in a particular time period you must ensure everything your characters use and interact with, are from that era. A 1940’s housewife will not have the luxury of a microwave oven, for example. However, when you have time travel within your story greater detail is required to ensure each era is true to its original. This not only gives the reader clues as to where and when your characters are but also gives your protagonist obstacles to overcome. Unless of course you have a time traveler visiting!

A friend of mine. J.E. McKnight, is an excellent time travel author and he is meticulous in ensuring the ‘time-line’ is correct as well as ensuring the ‘vehicle’ of travel is believable. You can purchase his book here: https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/264043

With attention to detail and solid back story, every narrative can be believable no matter how fantastical the characters, creatures or situations. Most of us ‘believe’ in Hobbits, Harry Potter and the like because the narratives are so strong in the basics of world building.

I have used reincarnation in my novel,The Twesome Loop, an alternative future  in Life in Slake Patch and magical creatures  in Ockleberries to the Rescue. If you can imagine the inconceivable – you can write it.

What worlds, characters or creatures have you created?

Imagination

 

 

Making the Inconceivable Believable…

December 27, 2013
mandyevebarnett


Inconceivable – definition: not conceivable; unimaginable; unthinkable

Glen

Writers have the ability to make the unimaginable reality in their narratives. There are no barriers, no limits to what a writer can create. Distant worlds, alternative realities and curious creatures are brought to life for the reader.

It may seem rather ‘easy’ to create a whole new world, but in actual fact there are numerous hurdles you have to jump. Fantasy readers, in particular, are extremely meticulous in ensuring consistency in a fantasy work and the ‘laws’ of the land therein.

This Q&A page is a great way to find out if your creation will stand up to their scrutiny.

http://www.sfwa.org/2009/08/fantasy-worldbuilding-questions/

And a great link for tips on world building here:

http://www.malindalo.com/2012/10/five-foundations-of-world-building/

Of course world building is not restricted to fantasy. If you are setting your narrative in a particular time period you must ensure everything your characters use and interact with, are from that era. A 1940’s housewife will not have the luxury of a microwave oven, for example. However, when you have time travel within your story greater detail is required to ensure each era is true to its original. This not only gives the reader clues as to where and when your characters are but also gives your protagonist obstacles to overcome. Unless of course you have a time traveler visiting!

With attention to detail and solid back story, every narrative can be believable no matter how fantastical the characters, creatures or situations. Most of us ‘believe’ in Hobbits, Harry Potter and the like because the narratives are so strong in the basics of world building.

I have used reincarnation (The Twesome Loop), an alternative future (life in Slake Patch) and magical creatures (Ockleberries to the Rescue)  in some of my novels. If you can imagine the inconceivable – you can write it.

What fantastical worlds have you created?

How did you decide on the ‘laws’?

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World Building in Your Story…

November 22, 2013
mandyevebarnett


Piceous – definition: pitch-black in color; a glossy dark brownish-black

PiceousThis Dungeons and Dragons creature is actually called Piceous. I think it is a pretty cool monster.

I do not play computer games so have no real idea what this particular creature does but reading on the Wikipedia site, this is the shortened description for Dungeons & Dragons. It is a fantasy tabletop role-playing game originally designed by Gary Gygax and Dave Arneson, and first published in 1974 by Tactical Studies Rules, Inc.. The game has been published by Wizards of the Coast since 1997. The Piceous is part of the Philosopher’s Stone Campaign.

While I was browsing the game site, I was impressed with the amount of detail  each game location and character had been given. There are maps for each ‘world’, profiles for every character and even statistics for the population of each race inhabiting the world.

This sort of detail shows us how world building can be achieved. Attention to detail is foremost in these game platforms and obviously great care is given to create each ‘world’ As authors we create stories populated with make believe characters and locations (for the most part) so to have a visual representation is an excellent way of bringing the story to life.

I have posted about character portfolio’s before https://mandyevebarnett.com/2013/05/28/be-true-to-your-character/  &  https://mandyevebarnett.com/2013/11/20/pretentious-personalities-help-create-characters/

What methods do you use to bring your characters and locations to life?

Do you cut out photos from magazines and paste them on a story board?

Do you draw/paint your story board?

Are you able to picture it all in your head?

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