Mandy Eve-Barnett's Official Blog

Inspiration for Writers & Building A Community ©

Ask A Question Thursday

May 2, 2019
mandyevebarnett


ask-a-question-logo-300x150

 

As we all know Shakespeare was adept at creating numerous words for his own works, which are even today in common usage (whether we known their origin or not!) So today’s question is: Do you make your own vocabulary words in your book or resort to the existing ones?

shakespeare_words_used_today

Here is a list of Shakespeare’s unique words:  

Bandit Henry VI, Part 2. 1594

Critic Love’s Labour Lost. 1598.

Dauntless Henry VI, Part 3. 1616.

Dwindle Henry IV, Part 1. 1598.

Elbow (as a verb) King Lear. 1608.

Green-Eyed (to describe jealousy) The Merchant of Venice. 1600.

Lackluster As You Like It. 1616.

Lonely Coriolanus. 1616.

Skim-milk Henry IV, Part 1. 1598.

Swagger Midsummer Night’s Dream. 1600.

Shakespeare must have loved the prefix un- because he created or gave new meaning to more than 300 words that begin with it. Here are just a few:

Unaware Venus & Adonis. 1593.

Uncomfortable Romeo & Juliet. 1599

Undress Taming of the Shrew. 1616.

Unearthly A Winter’s Tale. 1616

Unreal Macbeth. 1623

When we look at these words it is fascinating to think until the Bard created them they did not exist!

Please post your comments below.

Last week’s question: Where is your perfect writing retreat?

Weather it’s sitting somewhere with a legal pad, or sitting at my desk in front of my desktop computer, I need complete silence when I write.

Although I began my novel, NOLA Gals with an extended metaphor of the ocean while on a cruise, poolside with a tropical drink, I wrote most of it alone at my sister’s cottage. I moved back and forth between deck and kitchen table, piling up research books & handwriting historical data in ringed notebooks. Eventually it all came together on my laptop.

Lost Words of Manufacture…

May 9, 2016
mandyevebarnett


canning

adimpleate v 1657 -1657
to fill up
The new technique adimpleates the cans with milk through injection.

binoternary adj 1817 -1817
combining binary and trinary aspects
The dots on the ‘6’ face of a die are arranged in a binoternary fashion

buccellation n 1657 -1731
act of dividing into small morsels
The buccellation and apportionment of their rations was the subject of heated argument.

circumbilivagination n 1611 -1693
going around in a circular motion; circumambulation
She saw many quaint seaside towns in her circumbilivagination of England.

defedate v 1669 -1669
to defile; to pollute
The toxic chemicals continue to defedate our town’s water supply.

utible adj 1623 -1711
serviceable; useful
While the new system is much more expensive, at least it is utible.

Remember to visit:
http://phrontistery.info/clw.html

My sentence:

The machine utilized a binoternary system in its program. With a circumbilivagination channel a series of utible containers were adimpleate with buccellated portions. Strict cleaning of the channels prevented defedate of the contents.

Can you make up a sentence too?

food-processing

Lost Words – Of Ancient Gods…

April 25, 2016
mandyevebarnett


gods-and-goddesses

celeberrimous adj 1768 -1768
very or most highly celebrated
Her celeberrimous accomplishments were lauded by her colleagues.

krioboly n 1850 -1882
sacrifice of many rams; bath in blood of rams
Contrary to rumor, pagan rituals do not involve krioboly or baby-eating.

medioxumate adj 1723 -1723
of gods of intermediate rank between those of heaven and of hell
Medioxumate deities such as those of the Greek pantheon are rarely worshiped today.

nerterology n 1800 -1800
learning relating to the dead or the underworld
Her inquiries into nerterology were inspired by a youthful visit to a medieval crypt.

poliadic adj 1886 -1886
of the nature of a local or tutelary god
Respect for poliadic spirits and deities continued long after the region converted.

My sentence: Throughout the professors investigations, he was intrigued by the nerterology of poliadic, celeberrimous and medioxumate figures within the ancient religions. The krioboly however was distasteful to his way of thinking.

gods-war

Remember to visit – http://phrontistery.info/clw4.html

Lost Words of Independance…

April 11, 2016
mandyevebarnett


travel

I thought it was apt to follow on from my Wednesday blog concerning roaming or traveling with these great lost words.

apanthropinization                         1880 -1880
withdrawal from human concerns or the human world
His life as a hermit in the woods was characterized by apanthropinization.

assectation                                        1656 -1656
act of following after something else
She stood in the on-deck circle, her assectation virtually guaranteed.

autexousious                                    1678 -1678
exercising or possessing free will
If we are truly autexousious, then why do we so often feel powerless?

auturgy                                              1651 -1656
self-action; independent activity
The film director’s legendary auturgy frustrated editors and producers alike.

xenization                                      1818 -1818
fact of travelling as a stranger
This period of youthful xenization was the source of his later cultural tolerance.

My sentence:

An urge for auturgy and to assestation, such as her wanderlust, meant xenization would give Tania, the opportunity to exercise her autexousious and apanthropinization. Living  on her own terms not those of society.

Why not give it a try?

Don’t forget to pop over to the site where I get these words from – http://phrontistery.info/clw.html

Lost Words – Specialists…

April 4, 2016
mandyevebarnett


specialists

agonarch n 1656 -1656
judge of a contest or activity
Our competition will require six agonarchs to ensure fairness.

bumposopher n 1834 -1886
one learned in bumps; a phrenologist
Craniology has progressed greatly since the days of bumposophers.

jobler n 1662 -1662
one who does small jobs
We’ve found a great jobler who takes care of our repairs quickly and cheaply.

lignicide n 1656 -1656
woodcutter
We will not tolerate the lignicides who would despoil our old-growth forests!

oporopolist n 1671 -1725
fruit-seller
Our oporopolist’s oranges often offer odd odours.

orgiophant n 1886 -1886
one who presides over orgies
The orgiophant had dozens of hangers-on who sought to attend his parties.

rhodologist n 1911 -1924
one who studies and classifies roses
Any rhodologist knows that a rose by any other name does not smell as sweet.

seplasiary n 1650 -1658
seller or producer of perfumes and ointments
She had an allergic reaction after the seplasiary sprayed her in the eyes.

snobographer n 1848 -1966
one who describes or writes about snobs
The editors scrapped the society page because it was full of pretentious snobographers.

tragematopolist n 1656 -1658
confectioner; seller of sweets
No tragematopolist can match the appeal of a toy-store for young children.

zygostatical adj 1623 -1656
pertaining to a market official in charge of weights
His zygostatical training allowed him to cheat the scales undetected for decades.

hr-specialist

Remember to stop by this excellent website for more Lost Words – http://phrontistery.info/clw.html

My sentence today took sometime to formulate! Can you do better?

The gentleman’s club divided the members into categories dependent on their respectability and earnings. The oporopolist, rhodologist, seplasiary, bumposopher and tragematopolist were in one group as were the jobler, lignicid, zygostatical and agonarch. However the orgiophant and the snobographer were declined membership.

Blog at WordPress.com.