Tag Archives: movies

Author Interview Timothy Friend


Author-Interview-Button

Timothy Friend

  1. Does writing energize or exhaust you?

Most days writing leaves me energized. Some days I procrastinate, and on those days it’s exhausting.

  1. What is your writing Kryptonite?

In the early stages of a project any distraction has the potential to be writing Kryptonite. When I get deeper into the story and the pages have started to add up distractions have less impact.

  1. Did you ever consider writing under a pseudonym?

I’ve never given any serious thought to using a pseudonym.

  1. What other authors are you friends with, and how do they help you become a better writer?

I have friends who are photographers, filmmakers, and musicians, but no writers. The closest thing would be a couple of professors who have had a strong influence on me.

gunmen

  1. Do you want each book to stand alone, or are you trying to build a body of work with connections between each book?

So far all of my work has been stand-alone. I like the idea of doing a series, and plan to revisit the characters from my western novella “Gunmen” soon.

  1. What was the best money you ever spent as a writer?

The best money I ever spent as a writer was purchasing a copy of Stephen King’s “On Writing.” I highly recommend it.

  1. What was an early experience where you learned that language had power?

When I was in the fifth grade my class read the Ray Bradbury story “All Summer in a Day,” and it put me in a deep funk. That was the first time I thought about words on a page having any sort of lasting power. Later in the year we read “Flowers for Algernon,” which further strengthened that notion. Looking back now, it seems the fifth grade was one seriously depressing year.

  1. What’s your favorite under-appreciated novel?

“The Girl Next Door” by Jack Ketchum.

  1. As a writer, what would you choose as your mascot/avatar/spirit animal?

A giant tortoise. They’re slow and steady, and they live a long time.

Rocket Rider

  1. How many unpublished and half-finished books do you have?

I currently have two unpublished books. One is a horror novel, the other is a crime novel.

  1. What does literary success look like to you?

Literary success, to me, is continuing to be published. Financial reward is always nice, but honestly, if money were the primary goal I would take up a different occupation.

  1. What kind of research do you do, and how long do you spend researching before beginning a book?

I don’t like to hold up the writing to do research, as that tends to kill off my enthusiasm. If I am writing about a different time period, or an unusual location, I’ll do some light reading on the subject before I begin writing. After that I limit my research to specific questions that arise as I’m working on the story. By the end of the process I find I’ve done a good deal of research in total, which leaves me prepared to fix my mistakes in the rewrite.

  1. How many hours a day/week do you write?

I try to write three hours a day, six days a week- 8 a.m. to 11 a.m.

  1. How do you select the names of your characters?

Names have to be just right for me be able to move forward. They can come from anywhere. I’ve found character names on road signs, cleaning products and old comic books. Sometimes they come quickly, sometimes they are a struggle. But when I find the right one I can feel it.

  1. What was your hardest scene to write?

Any scene where I have to kill a character I’ve grown to like is difficult to write. I wrote a death scene for a dog that was especially rough.

  1. Why did you choose to write in your particular field or genre?  If you write more than one, how do you balance them?

I began writing horror, and most of my stories involved criminals. I quickly discovered I was more interested in the criminals than the horror, and so I shifted my focus to crime fiction. I find when I write in other genres I still tend to focus on criminals.

  1. How long have you been writing?

I’ve been writing since the second grade. That was the year children’s author Scott Corbett (The Lemonade Trick) came to my second grade class to speak. Up until then I had no real idea that making up stories was an actual job that people had. Once I found that out I knew no other job would do. I’ve been writing ever since.

  1. What inspires you?

Good writing inspires me. Especially by writers who have a better facility with language than I do.

  1. How do you find or make time to write?

I’m fortunate enough to have a schedule that allows me the time to write.

  1. What projects are you working on at the present?

At the moment I’m looking for a home for my crime novel “The Pretenders.” It was set to be released last year, but unfortunately the publisher closed shop before that happened.

  1. What do your plans for future projects include?

Future projects include the previously mentioned “Gunmen” sequel.

  1. You can find out more about my work here: http://www.timothyfriend.net/

Short stories included in:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bio:

Timothy Friend is a writer and independent filmmaker whose fiction has been published in Crossed-Genres, Thuglit, and Needle: A Magazine of Noir. He is the writer and director of the feature film, “Bonnie and Clyde vs. Dracula,” distributed by Indican Pictures. He holds an MFA from the University of Missouri-Kansas City.

Genres of Literature – Mystery


Mystery_fiction

 

Mystery literature deals with the solution of a crime or the unraveling of secrets. Any scenario that is kept secret or remains unexplained or unknown.

The most common scenario for this genre usually involves a mysterious death or a crime to be solved. It focuses on a closed circle of suspects, with each suspect having a credible motive and also reasonable opportunity for committing the crime. A detective is the main character, who will eventually solve the mystery by logical deduction from facts fairly presented to the reader. However, sometimes mystery books are non-fictional. “mystery fiction” can be detective stories but the emphasis is on the actual puzzle or suspense element with its logical solution revealed later, such as in whodunit’s.

Due, in part, to the lack of true police forces prior to the 1800’s, mystery fiction was unheard of.  Many towns only had constables or a night watchman at best. As populations grew in towns and cities, police forces were institutionalized, and detectives employed – thus formulating the mystery novel.

The most famous mystery sleuth was of course Sherlock Holmes. The novels and subsequent movies and TV shows have delighted audiences for generations.

Do you write mystery novels?

What or who is your favorite mystery sleuth story?

 

 

 

Liebster Award – Open To All…


I found this award over at: http://suddenlytheyalldied.com/2015/03/18/award-season-continues-again/

liebster

As I love conversing and sharing with other writers, I have taken up the challenge.

  1. What makes you dance?  The completion of a manuscript, the first sight of the new book cover and any music with a great drum beat.
  2. What is your favorite genre?  Don’t really have one… I read multiple genres and write them as well. I favorite Stephen King, Kate Morton, Felix de Palma, Maeve Binchey and James Long. So you see a broad spectrum.
  3. If you could have lunch with one of the captains from Star Trek or one of the characters from Star Wars, who would you choose and why? My husband watches these shows…not really my cup of tea. Although, I am drawn to the strong female characters. B’Elanna and Seven of Nine are great levers of those around them and do not concede quickly. As for my choice of Star Trek captains, I think I would choose Captain Kathryn Janeway – she stands her ground but her decisions are emotion and instinct based, which is her strength.
  4. Which five books would you take with you to a desert island? Ferney by James Long, Under the Dome & The Stand by Stephen King, The Lilac Bus by Maeve Binchey, Thrush Green by Miss. Read.
  5. Why did you start blogging? I was encouraged to begin blogging by my publisher and members of my writing group to highlight my passion for writing and to connect with other writers and promote my novels. I enjoy the community and interaction of my blog and set a schedule and theme/topic for the year prior to New Year’s day each year. One year I utilized a desk diary word of the day and created posts every day using the day’s word. It was a lot of work but was thrilling to see where my mind went to create each post.

Do please link back here if you take this award – I’d love to read all your answers!  Or if you don’t want to take the award, then answer some of the questions in the comments below.  Let’s get to know each other!

I would like to extend the invitation to my followers and these are the questions I have set.

1. If you could become a character from a novel, who would you be and why?

2. Given the opportunity where in the world would you live and why?

3. What was the first song (record, CD) you bought?

4. Which movie(s) do you wish had not been made from a book(s) and why?

5. Which era do you prefer in art?

Do have fun and link back so we can find your answers or leave a comment here.

A Literary Year in View…


literary news

A New Year brings anticipation of our goals and the fascinating reveals of new books and movies for the year ahead. This literary calendar will keep you informed as well as marking important dates to remember.

http://www.theguardian.com/books/2015/jan/02/books-2015-calendar-year-kazuo-ishiguro-jonathan-franzen-toni-morrison

Are there any that you are excited to see?

Unfortunately I could not find an equivalent for Canada or America so if you do find one please share it.

Childhood Heroes To Be Immortalised in Film…


For many of us Enid Blyton will be a reminder of our childhood. Reading the adventures of the Famous Five and imaging ourselves in those situations, caused delight and adventure at bedtime. I read today that there are plans to make a Famous Five movie. See link:

http://www.theguardian.com/books/2014/jul/25/enid-blyton-famous-five-big-screen-adventure

enid-blyton

It is a bold idea when most children nowadays are more interested in technological heroes, machines and violence. It will be interesting to see what sort of adaptation is produced. What are your thoughts on it?

Which childhood book (or books) would you enjoy watching as  a movie?

I love Stig of the Dump, as I can imagine a caveman trying to come to terms with modern day technology and how we ‘buy’ everything instead of making it or fashioning useful articles from whatever we can find.

FunDay

Today’s fun prompt is – How would you adapt your favorite childhood hero into a movie?