Lost Words – Games & Hobbies…


archerypotteryfishing

Today’s words from http://phrontistery.info/clw.html concern games and hobbies. Rather enlightening as to the types of games allowed in times gone by and others that have endured!
Ascoliasm                1706 -1753
boys’ game of beating each other with gloves or leather while hopping
If you think bullies are bad today, look at brutal games of the past like ascoliasm.

Piladex                      1897 -1901
game where an inflated bag is hit with hand to keep aloft across a table
From piladex to hacky-sack, pastimes involving hitting objects are known to all ages.

Riviation                   1676 -1676
fishing
While anglers are the sort who enjoy quiet contemplation, I find riviation to be boring.

Sagittipotent          1656 -1656

having great ability in archeryThe sagittipotent hunter found himself unable to kill the beautiful white stag.

Tornatil                    1661 -1661
made with a wheel; turned on a wheel
The potter was a master of his tornatil work, but many of his pots broke during firing.

My sentence: His over protective mother tried to persuade her son not to indulge in ascoliasm or piladex fearing he may be injured. However, she would encourage riviation, his becoming sagittipotent with a bow or even learn to tornatil in creating pottery.

Can you make a sentence? 

And an extra word because it does celebrate today’s special event – Leap Year.

Bissextus   February 29th: the extra day added to the Julian calendar every fourth year (except those evenly divisible by 400) to compensate for the approximately six hours a year by which the common year of 365 days falls short of the solar year.

Quotes: This odd day was inserted after the sixth day before the kalends of March, i.e., after the 24th of February, and was not counted as an addition to the year, but as a sort of appendix. Hence the sixth of the kalends of March was called bissextus, or double sixth, which root is still retained in our word bissextile, though the day is now added at the end of February. — E. S. Burns, “History of Chronology,” The Popular Science Monthly, April, 1881 Origin Bissextus comes from the Latin term bissextus diēs meaning “intercalary day.” It was so called because the 6th day before the Calends of March (February 24th) appeared twice every leap year.

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