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Author Interview – H.M. Gooden

May 15, 2019
mandyevebarnett


AuthorInterview

Thankfully we have the interview details now so only a day late 🙂

gooden

What inspired your latest novel?

I’m currently working on a novel for a retelling of Robin Hood and the Sheriff of Nottingham…it has completely gone off script though so I’m interested to see where it ends up!                                                                                                              

How did you come up with the title?                 

I actually don’t have a title yet! I think that’s a first for me actually. Now I’ll have to work on that before I can talk about it. Hmmmm! 

Dream

Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp? 

I tend to have repeating themes of good vs evil, but also of friendship, love and family. I think it’s important characters are strong but also can rely on their loved ones. That is what gives them the little extra they need to defeat the bad guy.

How much of the book is realistic?

The settings all exist, but there are a lot of fantastic elements. I love myths and legends and magic, so much of what happens in my book is impossible.

Are your characters based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

Pieces are, here and there, but my characters come into my head and as I write they tell me who they are. I don’t think a single character has been ever exactly one person I know.

stone

Where can readers find you on social media and do you have a blog?

I have a blog on my website, https://hmgoodenauthor.com

And can also be found on Twitter- https://twitter.com/HMGoodenauthor

Facebook- https://www.facebook.com/HMGoodenAuthor/

My fan page, Summerland gate,

https://www.facebook.com/groups/981341802029808/?ref=bookmarks

Goodreads- https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/17229510.H_M_Gooden

Instagram- https://www.instagram.com/hmgoodenauthor/

BookBub- https://www.bookbub.com/profile/h-m-gooden

Amazon- amazon.com/author/hmgooden

phoenix

Do you have plans or ideas for your next book? Is it a sequel or a stand alone?

Not sure yet! Chances are it will have something following it, and I’ve found that many of my characters and books intersect. So highly likely!

Of the characters you have created or envisioned, which is your favorite & why?

I have a special fondness for my first main character, Cat McLean, but I think I love them all. How can you pick your favorite child?

Do you favor one type of genre or do you dabble in more than one?

I love paranormal. I think it satisfies my wishes for a little magic in regular daily life, and maybe one day, I’ll find I have magic after all!

dragons

Do you plan your stories, or are you a seat of the pants style writer?

I do a little of both. I like to write a synopsis of what I think should happen, but often veer off course – that’s okay though, because I think stories truly evolve as you write.

What is your best marketing tip?

Be consistent- be yourself, be nice if you aren’t a nice person, and keep on working on it. What works for one person doesn’t work for all people, so don’t give up!

Do you find social media a great tool or a hindrance?

A bit of both! I’ve met some great writers and readers through it, and it can be helpful at having people find you, but it can also seriously eat up free time that could be used to write the next story

raven

OPTIONAL QUESTIONS

What do you enjoy most about writing?

I love the act of creation and finding out where a story will lead me. I’m always surprised by the end product.

What age did you start writing stories/poems?

Six? As soon as I could read I started writing

Has your genre changed or stayed the same?

Oh it’s so different! When I was young I tried to write reality and magic kept intruding. When I started again as an adult, I was looking for the magic and found it!

What genre are you currently reading?

I read a little everything- fantasy, romance, paranormal, mystery, thriller, self help, philosophy history- basically anything that catches my eye

Do you read for pleasure or research or both?

Mostly for pleasure- I spent twelve years reading for school and now I can read for pleasure again I’m making the most of it.

Who is your best supporter/mentor/encourager?

It’s a tie- my mom or my husband.

Where is your favorite writing space?

Anywhere my children aren’t haha!

If you could live anywhere in the world – where would it be?

In an RV- that way I can see the world!

Do you see writing as a career?

For many people absolutely- for me? No it’s a passion not a career. Maybe some day!

Bio:

M. Gooden has been scribbling on everything since she first learned how to hold a pencil. While often told that her handwriting was atrocious, she persisted, and upon discovering computers and learning how to type, she realized that she was no longer limited by her (admittedly) messy writing.

Unfortunately, life and work and family have conspired to make it only possible to write in the wee hours or at coffee shops, so most of her love of reading and writing are indulged at times when only vampires and insomniacs abound.

Beginning in October of 2017, her love of writing and the characters in the world she has created burst into public view in her first book, Dream of Darkness, which follows the adventures of a group of girls fighting evil with abilities that H. M. Gooden would love to have. As a result, 4 am has become even busier trying to find out what will happen to her paranormal buddies in the future, and book six, seven and eight are in the works.

 

Contact Information:

hmgoodenauthor@gmail.com

https://www.hmgoodenauthor.com

Social Media:

| Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Goodreads | Amazon Author Central | BookBub |

Gooden’s Summerland Gate – Facebook Fan Page

 

Author Interview – Tamara Plant

May 7, 2019
mandyevebarnett


AuthorInterview

img-4413

What inspired your latest novel?

Death has been a part of my life since I can remember but I didn’t realize it until two people I loved died within weeks of each other from completely different causes. To that point in my life, I’d lost countless relatives, a boyfriend, my mom, grandmother, grandfather, and father-in-law. Yet, the two losses I experienced in 2017 forced me to examine why I had been surrounded by death. Ultimately, the book is a series of love letters to people who have come in and out of my life, sharing the lessons I’ve learned and how death, love and soulmates are all connected.

How did you come up with the title?            

Originally, the book was going to be called Love, Me since that’s how I sign most of my letters but after sharing the original cover on my Facebook page, a friend suggested I drop the Me and simply call it Love. I initially shrugged off the suggestion until I played around with it and decided that I loved the title so I went with it.

Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

Death isn’t an easy topic to discuss and it’s definitely not an easy experience to go through. The book touches on the spiritual connection before and after death, and how you grief is experienced through the loss of love even if the relationship doesn’t end because of death. Basically, the book is about healing.

How much of the book is realistic?

All of it.

love

Are your characters based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

Everything in the book is non-fiction, the people I write about have lived, and the letters are written by people who knew me at certain points in my life.

Where can readers find you on social media and do you have a blog?

Twitter @soulmemos

Instagram @soulconversationswithtamara

Do you have plans or ideas for your next book? Is it a sequel or a stand alone?

My next book is connected to the teachings of Mother Teresa of all people. Anyone who knows me will find this completely baffling considering I am nothing like her but there’s a story connected to why I’m writing it *shrugs* I think it will be pretty good. Totally a stand alone book.

Do you favor one type of genre or do you dabble in more than one?

I’ve focused on non-fiction because I believe sharing your experiences can help others who might feel alone and if I can help one person get through whatever it is they’re going through, I know I’ve succeeded in my life purpose.

Do you plan your stories, or are you a seat of the pants style writer?

I channel write so basically when I’m writing, I sit down and let the words flow.

forgive

What is your best marketing tip?

Don’t pay for advertising. Building an authentic brand is more important than hitting a million followers with white noise social media ads.

Do you find social media a great tool or a hindrance?

I love social media however I filter through the negativity including anything political or the drama of the day. There’s enough toxic bullshit in the world, I don’t need it permeating my online life.

OPTIONAL QUESTIONS

Who is your best supporter/mentor/encourager?

My teenage son, Oscar, is the one person who reads everything I write and is proud of everything I’ve accomplished. We share a special bond and I love knowing that I can bounce ideas off of him or count on him to be the first person cheering me onto the finish line.

Where is your favorite writing space?

The Fairmont Jasper Park Lodge. I can sit in the Emerald Lounge all day and write.

If you could meet one favorite author, who would it be and why?

S.E. Hinton. She wrote the most iconic YA book of all time and I devoured The Outsiders when I was in Grade 7. I tweeted with her once while I was watching the movie. It was a surreal experience.

 

Bio:

Tamara Plant is the author of Forgiveness and Other Stupid Things and Love (because death doesn’t fuck around). Her story has been shared in the #1 International best selling book, Modern Heroine Soul Stories, and a wide variety of online summits, blog posts and video conferences. October 27, 2014 was proclaimed Tamara Plant Day by the City of Edmonton for her work celebrating 212 men and women across Alberta who made a difference through her annual event, the FIERCE awards. She offers workshops on how to understand grief, forgiveness, and soul connections, and can often be found on social media sharing posts about Eminem, angel messages, and wine. Oh, and once she tweeted with S.E. Hinton while watching The Outsiders. It was as amazing as it sounds.

Author Interview – Chynna Laird

April 30, 2019
mandyevebarnett


AuthorInterview

head shot

What inspired your latest novel?

Just Shut Up and Drive actually started off as a short story several years ago. I was part of a writing group that had weekly writing prompts that could be anything from challenging us to expand on a sentence or writing a story around one word to posting a picture. One week, the host of the group posted a black and white photograph of an old house. It must have been built back in the early 1900’s and had obviously been long ago abandoned. The story came to me right away and Gramps’ character, specifically, came to me the same night in a dream. I know that sounds weird but a lot of my ideas come from dreams I’ve had. A restless brain can prove to be a bonus from time-to-time. But that’s how Just Shut Up and Drive started out.

 How did you come up with the title?

The title so depicts the character of Gramps. He comes across as a brash, cranky, narrow-minded old man. But the more layers he lets peel away on his journey with Wil, and the more vulnerable he allows himself to be, we get to the heart of who he truly is.      

Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

Honestly, there wasn’t at first. I just dreamed about this story, got up the next morning and wrote endlessly for the next couple of weeks. Including pre-editing, I think it took me about 3 months in total from idea to finished manuscript. I guess if there was any message I’d like readers to take away with them from this book it’s to embrace all that life has to offer you, no matter what direction your own journey takes you on. Pay attention to what’s around you, absorb the stories others share with you, take away what you need to from each experience and don’t be afraid to make those pit stops along the way. Those stops can often reveal a thing or two either about yourself or someone close to you that you wouldn’t have discovered any other way.

How much of the book is realistic?

Just Shut Up and Drive is a pretty realistic read. All of the places Wil and his grandfather stop to visit are real places. The highway they go down and the descriptions of what they see would be the same as what anyone else taking the same drive would see. Gramps’ house in Winnipeg is basically my grandparents’ house. Of course, some situations I put them in aren’t exactly every day occurrences for most people, but my focus was making this as real as possible so readers could relate to the story and feel a part of the journey right alongside Wil and Gramps.

Are your characters based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

When I ‘see’ characters, I have borrowed some personality traits from people I know and sometimes I’ve put some of me in there. For the most part, though, the characters aren’t usually based on someone I know but a lot of the scenarios I put them in are based off of events from my own life and experiences.

Where can readers find you on social media and do you have a blog?

I do have an author blog at www.chynnalairdauthor.ca.

I’m also on:

Twitter: https://twitter.com/chynnalaird

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ChynnaLairdAuthor/

Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.ca/chynnaauthor/

G+: https://plus.google.com/+ChynnaLaird

Instagram (although I’m still trying to figure it out): https://www.instagram.com/chynna_l/

Author’s Den: http://www.authorsden.com/chynnatlaird

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/2882404.Chynna_T_Laird

I also write for PsychCentral (https://psychcentral.com/lib/author/chynna-laird/) and maintain two blogs on there. One is about raising a child with Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD), and the other one is geared more to women’s health issues.

 

Do you have plans or ideas for your next book? Is it a sequel or a stand alone?

I’ve just finished the next book in The Watcher series (the first book is Dark Water). I’ve also written another children’s book as well as a parent-to-parent book on Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD). And I’ve also just completed a new adult novel currently in the editing stages before finding it a home. I always have ideas brewing. Right now, I’m planning my next memoir and have a plan set for a new adult fiction novel, but we’ll see. The Watcher series is the only sequel set I’ve started. The others are all stand alone.
out of synch

Of the characters you have created or envisioned, which is your favorite & why?

Oh wow. That’s a toughie. My main characters are all the ‘underdog’ in some way. That invisible presence that not many others give enough time to, but who can make a huge difference in their own way. Each of them has had to face some sort of life hurdle and deal with it in the most positive way they can, bumps and all. And they are each searching, maybe not consciously, to fill some sort of void in their life. There is a character I created in my newest manuscript (that one will come out soon, hopefully) who is very much like me. But out of all of the characters I’ve created in my published works, I’d have to say my favorite is Wil Carter in Just Shut Up and Drive. He is funny, grounded and has an amazing relationship with his grandfather who raised him. And even though he faced the ultimate tragedy of losing his parents at a very young age, he shows others how to keep moving forward…with a little help from his very cranky, but very wise, grandfather. When I wrote the last sentence in Just Up and Drive, I actually teared up realizing I wouldn’t have the daily interaction with him anymore. But he’s still there.  He’s one of those powerful spirits that never truly leaves you. I hope readers feel the same way when they ‘meet’ him.
white elephants

Do you favor one type of genre or do you dabble in more than one?

I’ve been told I’m an eclectic writer in that I have dabbled in different genres. So far, I’ve published children’s books, memoir, adult fiction and young adult and new adult fiction. My heart is writing for youth so my books are clean, contemporary, true-to-life fiction. That’s not to say that down the road I won’t try something else, but that’s my focus for now.

Do you plan your stories, or are you a seat of the pants style writer?

I love this question. I think the only books I’ve written that have taken the time to plan out have been my memoirs. Maybe that’s because this genre is a lot more personal and revealing so you need to present the material in the best, most accepting way possible. Otherwise, I’m one of those weird authors who gets an idea for a story and can actually see it beginning to end in my mind. In a sense, it’s almost like transcribing what is already complete in my head. I’ll always write down character names and how they relate to each other as well as research specific things so that the information is accurate, but for the most part I just sit and write when the story is there.

What is your best marketing tip?

I’ve tried various tools out there but I’ve always found that the best marketing tip that’s worked with me is connecting with other authors in the same genre and being a presence in specific social groups relating to what I’m writing about. For example, most of my work is geared toward children and youth so I try to connect with these groups, and those who work with them. I also have no fear in discussing issues or topics on my blog that many others know about but may not talk about as much as they should. That shows that I’m not just writing about these areas, I take the time to understand them. I’ve found this means a lot to readers as they can see that I’m not just ‘blowing smoke’ and simply trying to make money off of a specific issue or group. I write about it because it’s important and it matters. This leads to word-of-mouth promotion, which is just as important or more so than traditional forms of marketing.

Do you find social media a great tool or a hindrance?

I actually see both sides of this. There are so many forms of social media out there it can be overwhelming to know which ones to go on and which can offer the greatest benefits for writers and authors. On the one hand, it can be a great tool in that it offers a way to get the latest, up-to-date information on our work to our readers. It also offers a way for readers to interact with authors in a way they normally wouldn’t be able to. I can’t speak for all authors but, for me, it warms my heart to read feedback from readers. It tells me my work is appreciated. On the other hand, spending too much time on social media, even for promo, takes time away from actual writing. The key is only allotting a specific amount of time to posting, responding to comments/questions and staying current with readers otherwise most of your writing day will be spent on it.

OPTIONAL QUESTIONS:

What do you enjoy most about writing?

First, I enjoy keeping my muse quiet for a while. She bombards me with ideas and never leaves me alone. I also think that I have a male muse as well so they fight for attention. Seriously, though. Writing is a tough job and many out there don’t truly understand just how hard it can be. It isn’t about throwing words together and having it all make sense. It’s about creating a story that’s believable, enjoyable and has the influence to absorb readers so deeply, they stay awake to read just one more chapter. That is one of the highest compliments a reader can give an author.

What age did you start writing stories/poems?

This is a great question I love to answer. When I was in elementary school, I believe it was Grade Four, we had an editor come to our class to discuss the publishing process. As an avid reader, I was thrilled. Then we got to write our own little book from start to finish. We wrote the story, drew our illustrations, created our ‘cover’ (which was basically laminated card stock…but still…) and bound it. After we were finished, we got to put our book into the school library for other kids to borrow. We were supposed to take it home at the end of the year, but I’d forgotten mine in the mad rush of starting summer holidays. I actually forgot about it.

About 15 years later, my younger sister came home from school. She had had library that day and was so excited about the book she took out. Guess what book it was? The one I created all those years ago, when I was the same age my sister was when she found it.

 I look that as a sign that was the profession I’d be in.

(My little book was called, “Super Bug”, which was all about a bug in a superhero costume whose only fear was size 12 shoes. J Every time our class had library, I’d always check to see if mine got taken out. And it did!)

Has your genre changed or stayed the same?

Somewhat. I do love to mix my sarcastic Scottish humor in there whenever I can. I still write for children and youth, though. That’s where my heart is.

What genre are you currently reading?

Well, I’m one of those readers who has at least three books on the go at once. You know, then I have something to read in each room. I’m reading a memoir right now, which I plan to review on my blog when I’m finished. I also bought a few books during the Boxing Day sales at Chapters. The one I chose to read first out of that stack is called, ‘Girl in the Dark’ by Marion Paux. I love suspense thrillers.

Do you read for pleasure or research or both?

I do read for research for my books, just to make sure I understand a subject enough. There is nothing worse than authors who choose to write about something and have no clue what they’re talking about. But I mostly read for pleasure. After all, if an author wants to develop and grow their craft, it’s good to absorb what you can from some fellow authors.

Who is your best supporter/mentor/encourager?

Wow. Well, I have a very small handful of people I consider mentors. They are authors, instructors, editors and publishers who have given me advice, tips and support over the years. Without them, I would have given up a long time ago. My greatest supporter was my Uncle Craig. He was my main promotor and tooted horns for me whenever he had the chance. I lost him last year, which was really difficult, but I know that wherever he is now he’s still turning heads in the direction of my stuff.

Where is your favorite writing space?

My writing space is my ‘office’ I created in our basement. I have everything I need surrounding me right at my fingertips. It looks like a bomb went off around here some days but I call it my ‘organized mess’. I know where everything is. As odd as it sounds, I actually write better when I can hear all my kids running around. My son has his video game area set up just outside of my ‘office’. He busies himself over there, turning around every so often to say, “I love you, mom!” and I absorb myself in my task at hand. It can get a little difficult when my youngest comes down and sits behind me in my chair asking 500 million questions, but it’s all good. I wouldn’t have it any other way.

Do you belong to a writing group? If so which one?

I belong to a few online groups, as well as a few local ones. Mostly, I am a part of the NaNoWriMo group, The Writers Guild of Alberta, the Canadian Authors Association groups on FB. It’s important to reach out to fellow authors as I have found that unless you are an author/writer, it’s difficult to truly understand the entire process.

If you could meet one favorite author, who would it be and why?

Oh boy, that is a tough one because I enjoy so many great authors. I love John Grisham, Margaret Atwood, Stephen King, John Saul, Chris Grabenstein. But I also enjoy authors such as Jodi Picoult who take real-life situations and turn them into a beautiful novel. Out of all of them, I think I’d like to chat with John Saul. One of the first books I read by him was ‘Come the Blind Fury’. Right after that, I knew I wanted to write for young adults.

If you could live anywhere in the world – where would it be?

Australia. I mean, I’d love to visit places like Scotland, Ireland, Hawaii and other places but I’ve always been drawn to Australia for some reason.

Do you see writing as a career?

I pretty much decided that it already is. There aren’t many authors who can completely rely on their royalties from their books, but I think that’s my goal. There’s nothing I’d rather be doing.

Do you nibble as you write? If so what’s your favorite snack food?

Oh boy. I try not to eat at my desk because then I’d never leave my work area. Having said that, I do have a small stash of two kinds of candy I actually like: Sour Skittles and Vanilla clusters. I call them my ‘think candy’. There you go. That’s something very few people know about me. lol

What reward do you give yourself for making a deadline?

High fives from my kids and a nap. Seriously. There are a lot of days my poor kids spend looking at the back of my head when I’m on a tight deadline (or four). Once I’m all caught up, we make a family favorite meal, enjoy each other then I fall asleep. You can ask them. I have my own blanket and space on the couch. lol

Bio:

CHYNNA LAIRD – is a mother of four, a freelance writer, blogger, editor and award-winning author. Her passion is helping children and families living with Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD), mental and/or emotional struggles and other special needs. She’s authored two children’s books, two memoirs, a parent-to-parent resource book, a Young Adult novella, a Young Adult paranormal/suspense novel series, two New Adult contemporary novels and an adult suspense/thriller.

Website: www.chynnalairdauthor.ca

 

Author Interview – Cindi Handley Goodeaux

April 23, 2019
mandyevebarnett


AuthorInterview

me

What inspired your latest novel?

I have two nieces that live in two different states and created my adventure loving main character to stay in contact with them. It started as a poem and I later developed that into my story.

How did you come up with the title?

Because my character loves traveling and adventures the title seemed natural.

Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

My purpose for this first book is to normalize disability for children. I use simple concepts like dancing on feet or wheels and singing out loud or signing with happy hands to accomplish this. I am a disability advocate and saw this as a way to connect my message with children.

How much of the book is realistic?

Other than disability being a normal part of life, the rest is a complete work of fantasy fiction.

Are your characters based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

Close friends call me Jellibean because they can see how much of myself I put into that character. She is positive, upbeat, and always ready to make a friend and learn something new.

princess

Where can readers find you on social media and do you have a blog?

https://ch.goodeaux.com/

Do you have plans or ideas for your next book? Is it a sequel or a stand alone?

Oh yes! I have completed four Princess Jellibean books that are under publishing contract. The second is currently being illustrated. I have plans to write this series indefinitely and have a list of things I want my character to encounter including traveling around the world and experiencing other cultures.

Of the characters you have created or envisioned, which is your favorite & why?

Princess Jellibean is definitely my favorite. I love her wide-eyed wonder and insatiable curiosity.

Do you favor one type of genre or do you dabble in more than one?

I love writing fiction because it allows me to create something that didn’t exist before. I started with poetry and have written that since I was 10 years old. I do want to try to write some self help in the future since I have several ideas in mind.

Do you plan your stories, or are you a seat of the pants style writer?

I am a mix of both. For some stories I like to plot out what I want to happen and for others I just let the story flow. I just finished writing a bed time story that I had so much fun with because it just poured out.

What is your best marketing tip?

Find ways to connect with your readers and know your audience. My audience is children, so I think of things that they would connect with and have colorful, plastic cat ear headbands to hand out when they purchase a book. I also make necklaces that feature images of my main character they can purchase separately.

Do you find social media a great tool or a hindrance?

Social medical is a brilliant tool when leveraged correctly and often. You can build a fan base this way when you put in the effort and time.

swimming

OPTIONAL QUESTIONS

What do you enjoy most about writing?

It allows me to express myself and provides a creative outlet which recharges my batteries.

What age did you start writing stories/poems?

I wrote my first poem at 10 years old.

Has your genre changed or stayed the same?

No, I thought I would always write only poetry and could not have fathomed becoming a children’s book author.

What genre are you currently reading?

I have been reading self help type books for creatives.

Do you read for pleasure or research or both?

Both! I love to read for fun and I love to dig into a topic that intrigues me.

Who is your best supporter/mentor/encourager?

My husband, Glenn, is my muse and biggest supporter. Behind him is my parents and his mother.

Where is your favorite writing space?

Right now, I write wherever I can since I don’t have a desk. We are currently planning to convert our unused dining room into a creative writing space.

Do you belong to a writing group? If so which one?

Yes, I belong to the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators, and just applied to be a member of the Cat Writers Association.

If you could meet one favorite author, who would it be and why?

Elizabeth Gilbert. Her book Big Magic is full of such wonderful sage advice about being fearlessly creative.

Do you see writing as a career?

I see writing as being my next level. I call it my retirement plan.

Bio:

Cindi Handley Goodeaux is a Florida resident who lives with her husband and muse. She is a proud mom, graphic designer wannabe, rescue dog lover, and a sometime poet. She is a member of the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators.

 

Author Interview – Kathrin Hutson

April 16, 2019
mandyevebarnett


AuthorInterview

Kathrin

What inspired your latest novel?

  • Sleepwater Beat was a combination of so many different things, it’s hard to pinpoint exactly where the inspiration came from. I’ve always loved the Latin idiom Stilus est superior gladio: The pen is mightier than the sword (it’s tattooed in Latin on my arm, after all). Really, Sleepwater Beat arose as the product of my imagination running away with what might happen if that were literally true—where words were literally more powerful than the sword, or bullets, or any modern physical weapon.

How did you come up with the title?

  • Originally, “Sleepwater” was supposed to be the name of a river. I never planned for this to become a novel. Sleepwater Beat was originally written as an experimental short story, where all the scenes were completely out of chronological order and had no rhyme or reason to how I ordered them (I literally made a bulleted outline of scenes, cut each one into a different strip, and basically drew the next one out of a hat). That short story experiment failed; it wasn’t nearly as effective as I’d hoped it would be in just over 30,000 words. But then I realized this thing really needed to be a novel instead. So, in that original short story, Sleepwater was the name of a river where Leo killed a man she was ordered to “dispose of”. As it turns out, that was one of the scenes in the short story that never made it into the novel. So then Sleepwater became the name of the underground organization of people who all have powers like Leo’s.

“Beat” in this title came as a sort of play on words. “Beat” as in “a metrical or rhythmic stress in poetry or music or the rhythmic effect of these stresses” – which refers to the rhythmic and metrical use of language by the main character Leo and the people in Sleepwater, all who can illicit physical responses in people just by using certain types of words. Then there’s “beat” as in “a regularly traversed round” (like a cop patrolling her beat, as the police definitely come into play in this book), and with the definition of “a group of news sources that a reporter covers regularly” (as evidenced in all the news reports peppered throughout Part 1 of the book). There’s a lot of play on words here. I think there has to be, when words become the most powerful weapon in a near-future dystonia not far off from our own future… maybe minus the genetic mutations. Who knows?           

Sleepwater Beat Ebook Cover                                                   

Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

  • I think the main message here is that everybody, no matter who we are or where we came from, is looking for a place to belong. Leo’s had a hard life, and by necessity, she build incredibly high, strong walls around herself as a person. She has to discover the kind of person she wants to be when faced with the opportunity to live and become a part of something bigger instead of merely fighting to survive one day after the next. There’s a more subtle message in here too (though maybe not too subtle, because I think it runs through all of my books) that the poor choices and large mistakes a person may have made in the past doesn’t define who they are, nor does it eradicate any possibility of redemption. We chose who we want to be moving forward, as long as we can forgive ourselves first and foremost.

 How much of the book is realistic?

  • I’d like to think everything in this book is realistic; that’s one of the most important elements of fiction in the first place, right? Really, the only thing that isn’t completely realistic is the superhero-type power found in Leo and the other members of Sleepwater. At least for now. A lot of what these people endure and discover through the story is left up to interpretation—whether or not these abilities stemmed from natural evolution or genetic engineering/experimentation. I like to think even “the beat” is a realistic possibility, as well as the few things that render it ineffective. One of the creepiest things that happened when I was finishing the first draft of this book was brought to my attention by one of my writing friends and alpha readers. He’d found a story of a new “high-intensity focus” drug, reported to do more for “clean energy and focus” than anything else out on the market. I can’t for the life of me remember what that was, probably because it was too close to home and what I was writing about the medication Pointera in Sleepwater Beat at the time. How strange to see the dystopian world I was building so closely reflected in almost real time by our own reality in science and pharmaceuticals right now. I definitely got goosebumps.

 Are your characters based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

  • Sleepwater Beat is actually the closest of all my six books to my own life and my own experiences. I’ve written more of myself into Leo than into any other character I’ve ever created, and it was honesty pretty scary to keep moving forward with it. Some scenes felt like a confession for me. Some of them felt like nostalgic recollection. Some of them were cathartic or merely a walk down memory lane. The really terrifying part was the idea that all of that would have been nauseatingly obvious to the reader. So far, I don’t think that’s the case. So this is a prime example of “writing what you know”, though of course I don’t actually have the ability to make people believe absolutely whatever I tell them. Not yet.

 Where can readers find you on social media and do you have a blog?

  • I’m definitely active on social media: facebook.com/kathrinhutsonfiction, Instagram @kathrinhutsonfiction, and Twitter @KLHCreateWorks. As much as I can, I do live Facebook videos every Wednesday morning. And my main newsletter goes out the second Thursday of every month. All my subscribers get some pretty sweet access to behind-the-scenes stuff with my writing and current stories, plus all my huge announcements and good news goes out to my subscribed readers first. I don’t have a consistent blog currently, with all the writing and marketing and everything else I’m doing. But my monthly newsletter (plus all the extra fun tidbits every week) is jam packed with most of what I’d blog about anyway. And anyone can join my newsletter right here: https://klhcreateworks.activehosted.com/f/29

Do you have plans or ideas for your next book? Is it a sequel or a stand alone?

  • Absolutely! Right now, I’m working on my newest Dark Fantasy trilogy, Vessel Broken. Book One, Imlach Fractured, will be out September 2019, and the other two books planned for the series (plus a prequel with the Playing with Fire boxed set in October 2019) will follow in the beginning of 2020. After that, I’ll be returning to the Blue Helix series. Just like Sleepwater Beat, all the other Blue Helix books will also be standalones, set in the same world and following the stories of these characters in Book One. I plan to have at least Book Two of the Blue Helix series out in 2020, if not also Book Three. We’ll just have to see what happens.

Of the characters you have created or envisioned, which is your favorite & why?

  • I’m going to stick with Sleepwater Beat’s characters here, because they’re in a world all their own (and still so much like ours). My favorite character in this book is Karl Daleheart—the first character we see in Chapter 1 and the man who becomes something like both Leo’s mentor and an older brother, in a way. He’s the tall, silent, brooding, totally apathetic and kind of a jerk character, though his stoic awareness both terrifies Leo and convinces her that Karl can actually help her. Then he becomes a good friend, and when we see him “in his element” with the other members of Sleepwater, Karl’s character becomes something else entirely. He’s got a super tragic backstory, and he also seems to be my readers’ favorite as well. I plan to bring him back here and there into the other Blue Helix books, though I can’t exactly say how, because… well, spoilers.

Do you favor one type of genre or do you dabble in more than one?

  • Actually, Sleepwater Beat is my first venture outside of Dark Fantasy—a story that had to be told in our world instead of one pulled purely from my own head. Being Dystopian Sci-Fi and Thriller, this book took a lot more research than anything I’ve ever needed for my Dark Fantasy books, which was quite the challenge for me. I really despise research, but it’s necessary when I’m dragging this cast of characters across the United States. I very much enjoy this genre, though, so of course I’ll continue it with the series as well. Still, my heart has a particular soft spot for Dark Fantasy—mostly just dark fiction in general.

Do you plan your stories, or are you a seat of the pants style writer?

  • I am a pantser all the way! Outlining and plotting tends to get pretty boring for me. All the excitement and the “writer’s zone” of creating these stories and characters comes from having to put the puzzle pieces together as they actually unfold. I never know exactly how a story’s going to end, or where the character’s will end up. It all comes together as part of the process, and I’m not sure I could ever outline something any more than a paragraph or two of summary.

What is your best marketing tip?

  • Well, this is a hard one, seeing as I still feel like marketing is the hardest part of being an author, especially an Indie Author. The best piece of advice I have is to, as an author, put yourself out there for your readers, potential readers, and anyone else happening by in ways that have nothing to do with the actual books you’ve written. My weekly live videos on Facebook rarely mention my own books (unless I’m giving them away as prizes). I talk about books I seriously freak out about as a fan, my favorite TV shows, my hilarious quirks, a few odd strings of random association here and there. But I put myself out there as a real person, passionately interested in real things beyond my books, and doing that has been an incredible piece of marketing. It’s that piece of original, authentic, intentional connection with people that has gotten me more organic readers and fans than I ever thought was possible. Yes, it was terrifying at first, but I’m loving the direction in which it’s taken me so far.

 Do you find social media a great tool or a hindrance?

  • Both! It’s an amazing tool when used the right way (which I can’t rightly say I’ve figured out 100% yet). Most of my marketing is done through social media, but it’s also so incredibly easy to get sucked into doing way more than merely marketing. As I’m sure everyone who has any social media accounts has figured out for themselves. I’d like to officially request an extra 12 hours added to the day so I can get all my social media in amid the writing and… well, the rest of my life. And sleep. It’s already a bit in short supply when I write full-time as a mother to a two-year-old as well.

OPTIONAL QUESTIONS

Do you see writing as a career?

  • Writing is my career, 100%. I work from home about 50 hours a week, and because of that ever-looming necessity for marketing and branding, scheduling, and everything else, I write about 40-45 hours a week. But it’s paying the bills, and I wouldn’t have it any other way! It’s been my dream since I first started writing when I was ten, and I’m so fortunate to have turned my love for the craft into a way of life, a career, and the means by which I support my family.

What reward do you give yourself for making a deadline?

  • The best reward ever? I give myself a day off to recharge and pretty much do nothing but read for fun, which is hard enough to fit in as it is when I’m writing full-time. The occasional glass of whiskey never hurt as a celebratory cheer, either.

Bio:
Kathrin Hutson has been writing Fantasy and Sci-Fi since 2000. She can’t get enough of tainted heroes, excruciating circumstances, impossible decisions, and Happy Never After. In addition to writing dark and enchanting fiction, Kathrin spends the other half of her time as a fiction ghostwriter of almost every genre, as an Independent Editor through her company KLH CreateWorks, and as Fiction Co-Editor for Burlington’s Mud
Season Review. She finds just as much joy and enthusiasm in working closely with other fiction authors on their incredible novels as she does in writing her own. Kathrin lives in Vermont with her husband, their young daughter, and their two dogs, Sadie and
Brucewillis, and is constantly on the lookout for other upcoming authors, great new books, and more people with whom to share her love of words.

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