Mandy Eve-Barnett's Official Blog

Inspiration for Writers & Building A Community ©

Ask A Question Thursday

June 6, 2019
mandyevebarnett


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On the cusp of my week long writing road trip, today’s question is: Where would you go for the perfect writing retreat?

balcony

My answer is probably predictable for those who know me – I would go to Rome.

Last week’s question When crafting a new story – what works best for you, laptop, fountain pen, dictation, or longhand? certainly hit a note with many of you, although the answers went to my Facebook author page. However, here they are:

 

  • Notebook, legal pad, post-it notes. I suck at typing, so if I try to get thoughts down quickly, “spell check” works overtime and muddles my train of thought.

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    Mary Cooney-Glazer For a story,in progress, my laptop. For random ideas, I jot things in a little notebook or scrap that gets tucked into it.

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    Liz Knowles
    Liz Knowles I use a notebook and pen. This is ideal for me, in case of electricity going out, battery running low, I have an accessible record of what I have been writing and it as makes a good record for later, in case I need to reference something or prove something. Typed words, do not always constitute proof its yours or that you wrote it. And these types of records are important to have to secure your work.

  • Linzi Carlisle Nokes I write on my laptop but keep a notebook alongside, in which I am constantly scribbling ongoing story notes.

  • Montgomery Frogg I usually write and illustrate my books on my lap-top, but if the sun is shining outside, I’ll often sit on my patio, writing a story with pen and paper, or sketching out illustrations with the old faithful pencil and rubber.

     

    Used to be long hand. Now, laptop for me.

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    Karen Probert Longhand for sure – my mind works differently when I can write longhand. The laptop for sure for editing as it is faster and more efficient.

     

    Please join in and leave a comment below.

 

Ask A Question Thursday

May 23, 2019
mandyevebarnett


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Today’s question is: What is your motivation for writing more?

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My reply is that I have so many stories tumbling around in my head, I have to keep writing to get them all out. Many of you know I only began ‘writing’ when I came to Canada so I’m now making up for ‘lost’ time! I have always been creative but for whatever reason I had never written ‘stories’ before for the explicit reason of allowing other people to read them.

What is your reason – leave a comment below.

Last week’s question: Have you ever turned a dream or a nightmare into a written piece?

 Katie O’Connor.

I’ve done that. Some of my best ideas come to me in dreams. If I was a thriller or suspense writer, I’d have even more writing material. My brain likes to frighten me at night.

Author Interview – Cindi Handley Goodeaux

April 23, 2019
mandyevebarnett


AuthorInterview

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What inspired your latest novel?

I have two nieces that live in two different states and created my adventure loving main character to stay in contact with them. It started as a poem and I later developed that into my story.

How did you come up with the title?

Because my character loves traveling and adventures the title seemed natural.

Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

My purpose for this first book is to normalize disability for children. I use simple concepts like dancing on feet or wheels and singing out loud or signing with happy hands to accomplish this. I am a disability advocate and saw this as a way to connect my message with children.

How much of the book is realistic?

Other than disability being a normal part of life, the rest is a complete work of fantasy fiction.

Are your characters based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

Close friends call me Jellibean because they can see how much of myself I put into that character. She is positive, upbeat, and always ready to make a friend and learn something new.

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Where can readers find you on social media and do you have a blog?

https://ch.goodeaux.com/

Do you have plans or ideas for your next book? Is it a sequel or a stand alone?

Oh yes! I have completed four Princess Jellibean books that are under publishing contract. The second is currently being illustrated. I have plans to write this series indefinitely and have a list of things I want my character to encounter including traveling around the world and experiencing other cultures.

Of the characters you have created or envisioned, which is your favorite & why?

Princess Jellibean is definitely my favorite. I love her wide-eyed wonder and insatiable curiosity.

Do you favor one type of genre or do you dabble in more than one?

I love writing fiction because it allows me to create something that didn’t exist before. I started with poetry and have written that since I was 10 years old. I do want to try to write some self help in the future since I have several ideas in mind.

Do you plan your stories, or are you a seat of the pants style writer?

I am a mix of both. For some stories I like to plot out what I want to happen and for others I just let the story flow. I just finished writing a bed time story that I had so much fun with because it just poured out.

What is your best marketing tip?

Find ways to connect with your readers and know your audience. My audience is children, so I think of things that they would connect with and have colorful, plastic cat ear headbands to hand out when they purchase a book. I also make necklaces that feature images of my main character they can purchase separately.

Do you find social media a great tool or a hindrance?

Social medical is a brilliant tool when leveraged correctly and often. You can build a fan base this way when you put in the effort and time.

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OPTIONAL QUESTIONS

What do you enjoy most about writing?

It allows me to express myself and provides a creative outlet which recharges my batteries.

What age did you start writing stories/poems?

I wrote my first poem at 10 years old.

Has your genre changed or stayed the same?

No, I thought I would always write only poetry and could not have fathomed becoming a children’s book author.

What genre are you currently reading?

I have been reading self help type books for creatives.

Do you read for pleasure or research or both?

Both! I love to read for fun and I love to dig into a topic that intrigues me.

Who is your best supporter/mentor/encourager?

My husband, Glenn, is my muse and biggest supporter. Behind him is my parents and his mother.

Where is your favorite writing space?

Right now, I write wherever I can since I don’t have a desk. We are currently planning to convert our unused dining room into a creative writing space.

Do you belong to a writing group? If so which one?

Yes, I belong to the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators, and just applied to be a member of the Cat Writers Association.

If you could meet one favorite author, who would it be and why?

Elizabeth Gilbert. Her book Big Magic is full of such wonderful sage advice about being fearlessly creative.

Do you see writing as a career?

I see writing as being my next level. I call it my retirement plan.

Bio:

Cindi Handley Goodeaux is a Florida resident who lives with her husband and muse. She is a proud mom, graphic designer wannabe, rescue dog lover, and a sometime poet. She is a member of the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators.

 

Author Interview – Kathie Sutherland

April 9, 2019
mandyevebarnett


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What inspired your latest novel? A few years ago, I worked with a personal growth mentor on a workbook for telling life story as a myth. I gathered the stories I wrote and from them created The Storyteller: Tales of Enchantment which was recently published by Dream Write Publishing. My weary Gypsy traveller is an elder who shares tales of magic and wonder while passing on wisdom in these short, fanciful pieces. I am currently at work on an autobiographical novel.

Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp? Maturity and aging are ripe with gifts. Elder tales are to be respected as much as traditional fairy tales, which focus on the courage to venture out into the world and seek their fortunes. Instead, my Gypsy Storyteller elder tales touch on the archetypes common to all of us as we age. I hope readers will grasp the deeper message of the stories, seeing in them the courage to confront the challenges of growing old. Our culture is youth-oriented and so I want the reader to appreciate that elders are heroes too.

How much of the book is realistic? These tales are symbolic of the lessons I’ve learned in life. In that respect, they are realistic. The themes are my own observations of loss, self-confrontation, masks, transcendence and seeing wonder in the world, all timeless insights learned by growing old.

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Are your characters based on someone you know, or events in your own life? Each story is a fanciful description of values and strengths I’ve come to accept in myself, and a way to reflect using active imagination and reflection.

Where can readers find you on social media and do you have a blog? I have an author page and a story page on Facebook, and a website with a blog at www.kathiesutherland.com. My blogs are few and far between lately as other writing projects have taken up space in my mind.

Do you have plans or ideas for your next book? Is it a sequel or a stand alone? Most of my writing is “life writing” in one form or another. My work is Self-centered, soulful and focused on wholeness although some think it is self-centered and ego driven.

Of the characters you have created or envisioned, which is your favorite & why? I believe each of us has a story in which we are the protagonist. My Gypsy Storyteller has created these tales to affirm my favorite voices. The Blind Gardener, The Good Wife, Grandmother Spider are all wise characters from my inner world.

Do you favor one type of genre or do you dabble in more than one? I’ve tried many writing genres, all of them focused on life story. Even as a child, my favourite books were fables, songs, fairy tales and classic stories, such as Heidi and Little Women. As an adult, I’ve embraced journaling for personal growth, become a certified journaling facilitator, written poetry and published it in chapbooks and bound books, gathered personal essays into a memoir collection, submitted articles to magazines, had my short stories published in anthologies; all of these works based on life events and family history. I’m currently working on an autobiographic narrative and two novels. I have recently been assisting elders and others at the end of life to identify the values of a lifetime and leave these insightful stories as a “Letter of the Heart” legacy for family and friends.

Do you plan your stories, or are you a seat of the pants style writer? Definitely seat of the pants but the stories are usually based on true events. Having a structure into which the story falls helps me plan.

What is your best marketing tip? This is not a question I feel comfortable with because I quickly lose interest after completing books and hurry off into new projects without marketing the published ones. Its the writing I love. I could use the help of a marketing assistant!

Do you find social media a great tool or a hindrance? I like social media as a way to reach out to others but I have to limit my time with it. My favourite self-expression methods are stories and poems in book form. I love using the computer to write and edit.

OPTIONAL QUESTIONS

What do you enjoy most about writing? Writing is “the way to me.” Every time I write, I learn something about my values, beliefs and strengths. This lifelong learning is very important to me.

What age did you start writing stories/poems? My mother brought our faraway relatives to life with family stories. As a child, I took on the role of correspondent and wrote letters to friends and family. I surprised myself when I wrote a good short story in 10th grade and later, found poetry could express my feelings as an adult in my early 30s. I became serious about life story writing in 2000 after attending a seminar focused on the lives of girls and women. Once I realized I had a story to tell, I embraced life writing.

What genre are you currently reading? Memoir and autobiography mostly. I love a good novel and love to encourage other writers in their efforts to create with words and enjoy acting as first reader for them.

Do you read for pleasure or research or both? Both. I love to learn more about my current interests, and this strength serves me well in my research. For example, I am reading books about building on my innate strengths, accepting my dark side, aging with wisdom and dying with dignity.

Who is your best supporter/mentor/encourager? Other writers and writing groups. My mother is my biggest fan and has read all my books. I have worked with personal coaches and other “balcony” people, including my psychologist.

Where is your favorite writing space? In my office/sanctuary. One of my favourite activities is taking a writers’ retreat whether with others or alone. Solitary time is essential to my writing.

Do you belong to a writing group? If so which one? Two, one in Sherwood Park and one in Fort Saskatchewan. I like to feel I belong, and writers groups are definitely the place I find community.

If you could meet one favorite author, who would it be and why? I am in awe of all writing efforts, because as I said earlier, we all have a story of some sort within us and I’m interested in how we express them.

Do you see writing as a career? I believe my life purpose is to grow into myself. Writing is a way to give my life meaning. Success in a career is simply loving what I do.

Do you nibble as you write? If so what’s your favorite snack food? When I write, my tea gets cold, and the ice in my drink melts. I’m not a snacker at any time!

What reward do you give yourself for making a deadline? I am working on giving myself credit for completing projects and enjoying the fruits of my labour because I don’t do that often enough. I’m usually off on the next bit of writing. My greatest reward is hearing someone say, “I can relate to this character and your writing.”

Other books by Kathie:

 

Bio:

Kathie Sutherland has recently published a collection of Elder Tales “The Storyteller: True Tales of Enchantment.” She is also the author of Things We Keep: A Memoir, and poetry books balancing Act; Shadow Girls in the Spotlight; Wind in the Trees; and Seeking Asylum. She has several large writing projects in the works including three novels.

Kathie is a well-travelled and observant student of life with 30 years of writing experience. In the past, she has facilitated journal writing workshops and is active in her local writing group. Currently, she encourages others as a story listener and writing companion to elders and those at the end of life as they articulate their values stories to share as a legacy in “Letters of the Heart.”

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Writing Prompt Wednesday

December 19, 2018
mandyevebarnett


Use these words in a short story or poem: icy, horse drawn carriage, heat.

I’ve shared mine below.

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Winter Treat 

An arm to steady me as I tread on the icy path

Thick warming coats help keep the cold at bay

The ground glistens in the early morning sun

I so wish I could stay beside the hearth

 

My husband’s hands raise me gently upward

Into the horse drawn carriages interior

A winter ride along country lanes

My breath visible with words uttered

 

With a tartan blanket across our knees

The driver cracks the whip high in the air

The carriage jolts forward as we snuggle

My smile shows he has successfully pleased

 

Rosy cheeks and laughter are the heralds

For our return with the noon day sun

The heat of the fire is most welcome

A clink of glasses to wintertime.

 

Please share yours in the comments.

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