Tag Archives: poetry

Author Interview Rayanne Haines


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RDoucet_2016_01 copy

 

  • Does writing energize or exhaust you? Writing energizes me. I love discovering things about my characters! Editing exhausts, me.
  • What is your writing Kryptonite? Distractions from my children! If I could just sit alone in a bubble I’d get a lot more done! Hahahahahaha.
  • Did you ever consider writing under a pseudonym? I did consider it. I write both poetry and Romance and put a great deal of time and thought into whether I should write them as a separate artist. In the end, I felt that like all woman I am complex and diverse and I shouldn’t be afraid that my different styles of writing reflect that.
  • What other authors are you friends with, and how do they help you become a better writer? I’m friends with many authors who are new and extremely experienced. They write poetry, memoir, romance, CanLit and on and on. The biggest thing I take away from these relationships is a network of support. Whether my experienced writer friends are supporting me and offering mentorship or I’m doing the same for a newer writer. None of us make it without a community.
  • Do you want each book to stand alone, or are you trying to build a body of work with connections between each book? My romance books are a series – The Guardian Series.

fire born

  • What was the best money you ever spent as a writer? Having an editor or writing consultant look over every book has been the best money I ever spent. You simply can’t skimp on editing. And even then, I find mistakes but imagine if I’d never had an editor!
  • What was an early experience where you learned that language had power? I think I’ve always felt this way. My mother was an avid reader and we began reading very young. I remember being swept away by the magic of words and on hard stays finding power and beauty in them. There is nothing more magical than a book.
  • What’s your favorite under-appreciated novel? Probably something by a local author. S.G. Wong writes hard-boiled detective books set in an alternative future with ghosts. Kate Boorman wrote a fantastic YA series. The three in the series are Winterkill, Darkthaw and Heartfire.
  • As a writer, what would you choose as your mascot/avatar/spirit animal? A Raven. It’s on my logo and Raven’s show up in every book I’ve written including my poetry books.

MagicBorn

  • How many unpublished and half-finished books do you have? Just one J Book 3 in my series is still a work in progress. Though I do have a short story I’ve been working on for years.
  • What does literary success look like to you? Being a part of the literary community. Having books published and knowing people like them. I may never make a fortune off my books but If I can live and work in the literary world then that is success to me.
  • What kind of research do you do, and how long do you spend researching before beginning a book? I typically research as I’m writing.
  • How many hours a day/week do you write? This varies throughout the year. From May through January I try to write daily for 2 to 4 hours a day. During February, March and April my writing is quite sporadic. I run a literary festival and those months are extremely hectic for me. I find I have difficulty focusing and spend more energy on planning or marketing over writing during those months.
  • How do you select the names of your characters? With great difficulty. Hahahah. Actually, some come to me very quickly and easily and others I research meanings to see if they fit with that character.
  • What was your hardest scene to write? Fight scenes are hard for me. Especially ones with many characters in it. Keeping everybody’s movements correct and how they are physically and verbally interacting with intensity. I expend a lot of energy writing these.

Stained

  • Why did you choose to write in your particular field or genre?  If you write more than one, how do you balance them? I write Poetry and Paranormal Romance. I love them both. I grew up reading Romance so if felt natural to write it. And Poetry is one of my great loves. I love seeing how a truly fine poet can craft language. I think reading poetry makes you a better writer.
  • How long have you been writing? Professionally for six years.
  • What inspires you?   Nature. Silence, Strong Women.
  • How do you find or make time to write? Less TV – More = More writing time.
  • What projects are you working on at the present? I’m currently promoting book two of my series, Magic Born, which launched June 6th! And working on book three of the Guardian Series – Air Born!
  • What do your plans for future projects include? I’m hoping to produce an anthology of femme prairie writers over the next two years.
  • Share a link to your author website. – http://www.rayannehaines.com

Bio: Rayanne Haines is a best selling romance author, published poet,
and arts manager. 

She writes Paranormal Romance with Kick-Ass Heroines. She believes in magic
and legend and all the things we cannot see. Rayanne prefers her alpha males
a little gritty and the women who love them, in charge of their own destiny.

“The Guardians” is her debut series with New York publishers, SoulMate
publishing. Book One, Fire Born, released September 2017. Book Two, Magic
Born releases June 6th! Look for Air Born winter 2018.

Author web links:
Good reads – https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/36104647-fire-born
website and newsletter sign up – http://www.rayannehaines.com/
https://twitter.com/inkrayanne https://www.facebook.com/rayannehaines/
https://www.instagram.com/rayanne_haines/

Author Interview – Sandra Hurst


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Sandra Hurst

  1. Does writing energize or exhaust you?

That definitely depends on what I’m writing. Some scenes flow so easily onto the paper with very little effort. My imagination sees the pictures, hears the voices, and obeys. Other times it can be emotionally harrowing. It can take me days to get over the death of a beloved character, even though I made the decision to kill her off.

  1. What is your writing Kryptonite?

Handling my own nature is the hard part for me. I tend to be very distractible and moderately obsessive. There is always that one more piece of research, a new book to read, and, Oh Look! I got a facebook mention. My mind will bounce to anything new and shiny and sometimes when it lands on a topic I find it hard to let go and get back to the writing. There is a definite benefit to this type of mind though, once I start writing and the scenes are flying, I will keep going until someone pulls me out.

  1. Did you ever consider writing under a pseudonym?

I actually do write under a synonym. I work in the legal profession and was advised that it might be better not to use my real name for security purposes.

yketa4

  1. What other authors are you friends with, and how do they help you become a better writer?

I have been so lucky! Two of the first people I met when I started to write were Rebekah Raymond and J.J. Reichenbach, they, along with several others convinced me that my ‘baboon crap’ was worth the effort and helped me get started learning the craft of writing.

  1. Do you want each book to stand alone, or are you trying to build a body of work with connections between each book?

My original plan was three standalone books in the same world. But the story doesn’t seem to be working out that way.  It looks like being a three-book series.

  1. What was the best money you ever spent as a writer?

In the beginning I’d say joining the Alexandra Writers Centre Society, a local writers group that runs classes on everything from writing technique, to plotting, to poetry. Once my book was underway, I hired a good editor whose knowledge of her craft and determination to present my work at its best is the reason Y’keta is a polished, professional read.

  1. What was an early experience where you learned that language had power?

When I was little, we had a burgundy set of children’s encyclopaedia’s and I would put on performances in the living room and insist that my family listen to the stories and legends that I read. I grew up on the stories of Robin Hood, King Arthur, and the Fae. What else could I ever be?

I love the authors who can make words dance and sentences MEAN things. This has led me to authors like Guy Gavriel Kay, and Don Dellilo. I would give my left ovary (not so dramatic a thing since at 55 those parts are hardly crucial) to sit down with either of these gentlemen, or even better their writing notes, for an afternoon!

  1. What’s your favorite under-appreciated novel?

That’s a hard question, there are so many good novels that go just under the popular radar. For me M.K. Wren’s Sword of the Lamb is a definite favourite. How will a government that has spanned centuries react when faced with political and social unrest? How does this affect the people born to a world that has never changed? If you enjoyed Asimov’s foundation series, you will probably like this one.

  1. As a writer, what would you choose as your mascot/avatar/spirit animal?

Oh fun! I think I would take a raven as my spirit animal. They are known for being wise birds but also for having a sense of fun and mischief.

  1. How many unpublished and half-finished books do you have?

Eeep. Do I have to admit it? At least eight, there is just not enough time!

  1. What does literary success look like to you?

For me its all about the reader’s reaction. Yes, the sales are great (PLEASE – buy the books), but if one person says to me that my words opened their eyes to a bigger world, or that I showed them the power of words and the beauty that they can bring, then I’m a success.

  1. What kind of research do you do, and how long do you spend researching before beginning a book?

I originally didn’t think that I was researching to write a book when I started out to write Y’keta. About five years ago, my husband found out that he was part Cree. At that time, I went back to the indigenous legends I’d learned growing up in Northern Alberta as a way to teach my son the history and culture that my husband never learned.  For more than four years I studied the language and history of several different indigenous cultures.

  1. How many hours a day/week do you write?

When the words are flowing I write two to three hours a day. When things aren’t so easy and I’m struggling with a scene or a plot point it’s harder, but I try to keep to writing something every day. Whether poetry, or as part of my ongoing books.

  1. How do you select the names of your characters?

I try to find names that will work within the cultures of the story taking into consideration the ‘hardness’ or ‘softness’ of certain sounds and whether they match the character. In Y’keta, I borrowed the name of a traveller that my friend met in Ontario (Y’keta) and adjusted the name of my cousin, Sian.

  1. What was your hardest scene to write?

In my work-in-progress, D’vhan, there is a scene where a young child dies. Writing it was emotionally crippling and took me to some very dark areas of my past. It was a necessary part of the story, but very very hard.

  1. Why did you choose to write in your particular field or genre?  If you write more than one, how do you balance them?

I write fantasy because the words are my way of exploring a world I can’t see. I’m a mythmaker, there is nothing that gives me more creative juice than asking a question and then building a world to find the answer. Myths and fantasy give us the opportunity to look at ourselves in new and often unusual ways, to play a huge game of ‘what if’ and see where the answers will fall. I find the basic understanding is the same when I’m working on romance books, except that you are now playing what if with relationships and feelings.

  1. How long have you been writing?

According to my mum I have always written stories and poems. I wrote my first ‘official’ poem in Grade four and had my first work published in a school magazine in 1977.

  1. What inspires you?  

There are so many people that inspire me, whether they are historical figures or literary ones. I think the common thread in all of them is that they had the opportunity to quit, every reason to say I’m too old, too tired, it’s just easier to let it be someone else’s problem. This kind of hero, unwilling, often flawed, yet willing to step up, gets me every time.

  1. How do you find or make time to write?

Finding time to write is an ongoing issue for me. I have started to take myself on writing dates, the people at the local Starbucks know my name and how I want my coffee, they don’t ask anymore.  I also have a great group of writer friends that hold sleepovers now and then. Much laughter, much wine, and many words have come from these weekends.

  1. What projects are you working on at the present?

I’ve got three projects on the go at the moment, with a never empty folder of ideas on the backburner.

The next book in the Sky Road Trilogy, D’vhan, is in the ‘necklace’ stage of drafting. I’ve got several pearls but I’m missing the chain of story movement that will tie them together.

I am working on a romance that will be part of an upcoming series of novellas with my contribution, Peace Out, slated for May 2018.

There is also a chapbook of poetry in the works, although at the moment the prose has centre stage.

Romance novella, Peace Out releases on May 4th.  Video.  

Peace Out video link. 

  1. What do your plans for future projects include?

I am plotting a YA Fantasy based on a world where the center of the earth is molten magic and drilling is creating imbalance and magic quakes – Geomages! I’ve also got poetry,plans for a darker themed adult fantasy about a dying world that even the gods have abandoned, two other romance novels and a space opera. So much to do! It’s going to be fun.

  1. Share a link to your author website.

Website:       http://www.delusionsof literacy.com

Twitter           _SandraHurst
Facebook:    SandraHurst.Author

Author Interview – Bruce Solheim


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bruce-solheim

1.      Does writing energize or exhaust you?
When I’m in the zone I can go all day long and stay focused and energized. I’m even manic sometimes if you ask my wife Ginger. Then I crash. When I’m agonizing over some plot point, character, twist, nagging and elusive detail or whatever, that is exhausting, and I can slowly slip into madness (to quote the Grinch).

2.      What is your writing Kryptonite?
Thankless, petty BS piling up that I don’t want to do and that sucks up my precious time. Any kind of paperwork or forms or the like. These things put me in a bad mood and I can’t write when I’m in a bad mood.

3.      Did you ever consider writing under a pseudonym?
How do you know that I’m not already writing under a pseudonym? Yes, honestly, but those thoughts passed quickly, just like my plan to be a caped superhero.

 

 

 


4.      What other authors are you friends with, and how do they help you become a better writer?
David Willson, my mentor, Vietnam veteran and author of the REMF series (REMF Diary, REMF Returns, In the Army Now). I met David when I started teaching after graduate school in 1993. His encouragement, honesty, attention to the details of quotidian life, sardonic wit, and dark Nordic sense of humor have influenced my writing heavily.

Dr. Gary Hess, my doctoral committee chair and author of many fine history books (The United States at War, 1941-1945, Vietnam: Explaining America’s Los War, Presidential Decisions for War: Korea, Vietnam, the Persian Gulf, and Iraq). Gary has impressed me with the volume of his work, the detail and scope of his historical analyses, work ethic, kindness, and service to his community.

Neil H. Weiss, another mentor. Neil helped me learn how to write plays. He is an accomplished screenwriter, television writer, and director. Neil has pushed me to be the best I can be and will not accept anything else other than your best. He is a hard-driver and does not mince words or waste any time.

Jose Cruz Gonzalez, another mentor. Jose writes plays for young audiences (The Astronaut Farmworker, Tomas and the Library Lady). He inspired me and taught me to write through mystical expression and the exercise of capturing butterflies. He is a kind and gentle human being with a heart of gold.
Ali's Bees
5.      Do you want each book to stand alone, or are you trying to build a body of work with connections between each book?

I write books, plays, poetry, and songs. They largely stand alone, but there is a common theme in all my written works: find the hero within and make strong choices in your life. We are the heroes of our own life stories. I’ve written about a diverse selection of characters from a gay combat soldier in Vietnam (The Bronze Star) to a 13-year-old refugee boy dealing with Islamophobia in East Los Angeles (Ali’s Bees), from a timid school teacher who finds her inner strength and becomes an anti-Nazi resistance fighter in occupied Norway (The Epiphany), to a wounded Civil War veteran who goes west to find his runaway wife and search for gold, only to find himself and recover his lost soul (Tough Trip Through Hell, a play based on David Willson’s unpublished novel). Most of my written work deals with the impact of war on people and on society. The settings range from the Old West to occupied Norway in World War II to a post-apocalyptic Earth ruled by wandering bands of mutants. My non-fiction books range from foreign policy in the Nordic Region to women leaders to the Vietnam War to a new take on modern American history since the Civil War. They all focus on the individual and how people who make brave and strong choices make our world better and lead the way in search of truth and meaning. My latest work includes illustrations. Gary Dumm, of American Splendor fame, illustrated 12 comic book pages for my anti-textbook (Making History: A Personal Approach to Modern American History) and will illustrate my two paranormal books (Timeless: A Paranormal Personal History and Timeless II). Gabby Untermayerova illustrated my fiction book for middle grade readers. “You can do anything with words and pictures,” as Harvey Pekar once said.

6.      What was the best money you ever spent as a writer?
Copy editing, line-editing, and more editing. Also, illustrations by inspiring and amazing artists.

7.      What was an early experience where you learned that language had power?
I grew up with two languages, Norwegian and English. Because my father could not write in English, I would write letters for him. Actually, I would type letters for him. This started when I was nine years old. I was fascinated by typewriters and books. I loved listening to my dad’s stories of his sailing days in the 1930’s and of the Nazi occupation. I began writing stories at age 10 and have never stopped writing. I wrote short stories, screenplays, poems, and illustrated and wrote comic books (nothing published). I had a short-lived comic strip (Snark: A Space Tragedy) in my school paper at Montana Tech. I published my first book in 1994 and had my first play produced in 2012. Now I’ve written seven books and eight plays. When I visit Norway, I speak Norwegian and it’s almost as if I’m a different person, or maybe a more complete person. My friend Neil said that I’m like a gate that swings between the United States and Norway. That is powerful.

8.      What’s your favorite under-appreciated novel?
David Willson REMF Diary. David has captured what it is like to be a file clerk in the middle of a war. The great majority of veterans do not see any combat, but that literature is rather thin. David Willson’s REMF Diary set the bar for all others.

9.      As a writer, what would you choose as your mascot/avatar/spirit animal?
Lion. When I was a kid I watched a Daktari on TV. Clarence the cross-eyed lion was a regular.

10.  How many unpublished and half-finished books do you have?
Two books. Three unfinished plays.

11.  What does literary success look like to you?

R-E-S-P-E-C-T

12.  What kind of research do you do, and how long do you spend researching before beginning a book?
Oral interviews, correspondence, networking, and online archival research. I start as soon as I get an idea and write as I research. “Time’s a wasting.”

13.  How many hours a day/week do you write?
On average, 3 hours.

14.  How do you select the names of your characters?
The sound of the name, the interesting people whom I have met who have similar names, and historical figures.

15.  What was your hardest scene to write?

The first one and the last one. If you mess up either one, the book is ruined. In fact, the first sentence and the last one, are the hardest to write and can also mess up your work. Start strong and finish strong.

 

 

 

 

16.  Why did you choose to write in your particular field or genre?  If you write more than one, how do you balance them?

I have a Ph.D. in History so naturally I have written historical non-fiction. My theatrical plays are usually historically-based and then fictionalized, but I’ve broken away from that with certain issues that interest me or problems that I see not being given enough attention. I wrote my first fiction novel just recently. It was geared for middle grade readers and above and it began as a play. My latest play is a sci-fi rock opera set in a post-apocalyptic Earth (Timothy). I feel compelled to write something based on what possesses me. Sometimes the idea is a sudden burst and sometimes it is a slow burning compulsion. I don’t attempt to balance anything, it just happens.

17.  How long have you been writing?

Since age 10, so 49 years.

18.  What inspires you?  

Good food, Ginger (my wife and muse), music of all kinds, my children and grandchild, a thought-provoking book or film, animals, Northern Norway, and a righteous cause.

19.  How do you find or make time to write?

I get up earlier than anyone else. The early bird gets the worm. I don’t like downtime, so I fill my day here and there with research or writing.

20.   What projects are you working on at the present?

I’m working with my friend Carsten Dau on a rock opera based loosely on Timothy Leary but set in the post-apocalyptic future. I’m finishing up Timeless and have already started Timeless II. The premise of my paranormal books is that science has already found evidence for the paranormal and we all experience these phenomena, but many people are afraid to acknowledge their experiences. I’m not afraid, and I encourage others to come forward. As I always say, “it is not that I believe in ghosts, it’s that they believe in me, so I don’t have a choice.” As I write these words I have just started a thriller set in the near future in the Nordic region (written in Norwegian).

21.   What do your plans for future projects include?

More plays, getting my other plays fully produced, more paranormal personal history books, and responding to the next question in life. I also don’t rule out some type of interplanetary travel, as long as I can fly first class. Coach is rough enough as it is here on Earth.

22.   Share a link to your author website.

www.bruceolavsolheim.com
www.thebronzestar.com
www.Alisbees.com
www.theepiphany.net

 Bio:

Bruce Olav Solheim was born on September 3, 1958, in Seattle, Washington, to hard-working Norwegian immigrant parents, Asbjørn and Olaug Solheim. Bruce was the first person in his family to go to college. He served for six years in the US Army as a jail guard and later as a helicopter pilot. He earned his PhD in history from Bowling Green State University in 1993.

Bruce is currently a distinguished professor of history at Citrus College in Glendora, California. He also served as a Fulbright professor in 2003 at the University of Tromsø in northern Norway.

Bruce founded the Veterans Program at Citrus College and cofounded, with Manuel Martinez and Ginger De Villa-Rose, the Boots to Books transition course—the first college course in the United States designed specifically for recently returned veterans. He has published five books and has written seven plays, two of which have been produced.

Bruce is married to Ginger, the girl of his dreams, who is a professional helicopter pilot and certified flight instructor. He has been blessed with four wonderful children: Bjørn, Byron, Caitlin, and Leif. He also has a precious grandson, Liam. Bruce, his brother, and his two nephews still own the family home in Åse, Norway, two hundred miles above the Arctic Circle.

Author Interview – A.L. Butcher


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Please be aware some of Alex’s novels are 18+ rated.

  1. Does writing energize or exhaust you?

Both! I have fibromyalgia so some days I don’t have the energy to do much of any use. I try and write everyday (and don’t always succeed), but some days, if I feel OK I get a total buzz from the writing. It’s satisfying to create something, and the feel-good is worth a lot. On the other hand the non-writing days make me feel a bit rubbish. It does depend on what else I have done that day. I work full time, so writing is usually limited to the evenings, weekends and holidays. I enjoy it though. When it becomes a burden I will stop.

  1. What is your writing Kryptonite?

Gaming and the internet. I am easily distracted. I’ll just go online for half an hour before I write… just 30 minutes…. Who am I kidding?

  1. Did you ever consider writing under a pseudonym?

I have and I do. I have an erotic romance written under the name Alexa Lynsey (which incidentally just won an award from Princess of the Light blog for best Erotic Romance in 2017).  The downside is the promotional aspect. It takes ages to build a following and to start over is hard. That said it has benefits as well – especially for the ‘adult’ genres.

  1. What other authors are you friends with, and how do they help you become a better writer?

Tori Zigler, Barbara Tarn, Joe Bonadonna, Janet Morris, Nickie Storey-Bailey, Diana L Wicker and several others. The indie author scene tends to be supportive. We share networking ideas, we offer advice on books, and promotion. We grumble to each other, and enjoy one anothers successes.

  1. Do you want each book to stand alone, or are you trying to build a body of work with connections between each book?

The Light Beyond the Storm Chronicles series is just that – a series – but each book can be read alone to a degree. It helps to know the world and the past events but the books are still enjoyable as stand alones. The Tales of Erana series are set in the same world but stand alone – there are two novellas and a short story collection. These are the myths and legends, the old tales and the ‘side’ tales.

The Light Beyond the Storm Chronicles Banner

The Kitchen Imps – short stories in one collection so that can be read alone.

The two Legacy of the Mask novellas share a link but can be read alone and in any order.

The Watcher- A Jack the Ripper Story is a standalone.

Outside the Walls is a standalone

  1. What was the best money you ever spent as a writer?

Editing! Various courses to hone the craft.

  1. What was an early experience where you learned that language had power?

That’s hard! I think it was probably the first time I can remember going to the theatre. It was a production of Voyage of the Dawn Treader by CS Lewis. I was spellbound. That inspired a love of theatre, fantasy and storytelling. The tale and its production were amazing and I came out feeling elated. Narnia was a whole new world, in the back of a wardrobe, with the great aspects of appealing characters, a brilliant story and worldbuilding.

  1. What’s your favorite under-appreciated novel?

I’d say either I, the Sun or The Reader of Acheron.

9. As a writer, what would you choose as your mascot/avatar/spirit animal?

A monkey, or a squirrel. I love both animals. Both are crafty, intelligent, and twist themselves in circles.

10. How many unpublished and half-finished books do you have?

Lots! Currently six or seven works in progress and a few other things that may one day be adapted into stories.

11. What does literary success look like to you?

Readers telling me they like the books, asking when the next book is, and making people happy with the stories.

12. What kind of research do you do, and how long do you spend researching before beginning a book?

That depends. I have researched such things as whether a salamander is edible (it is but you probably wouldn’t want to eat it); swamp terrain; poisons; field surgery; the airspeed velocity of a dragon, and what could make it fly. It really depends on what is needed for the work in questions. I do think research is important. Readers aren’t stupid – they will notice if something doesn’t work or is awry. There’s nothing like a screaming great plot or research hole to drop a reader right out of a book. That said it can’t be assumed that readers have the same knowledge of the world (especially a made up world) the author does.

13. How many hours a day/week do you write?

Well… I would like to say I write every single day but it’s not true. I work full time and I have a few health issues which means some days I can’t think straight, let alone string a coherent sentence together. I write several times a week, be it story, review, blog post, interview or poetry. My New Year’s resolution is to write for at least an hour a day – after all I can always delete it.

14. How do you select the names of your characters?

Baby names book, names I like the sound of or fit the characters and misspelled human names.

15. What was your hardest scene to write?

Pretty much any battle scene! Although there were some scenes in book III where a character dies and I blubbed a bit. Oddly sex scenes are much easier. I guess as usually battles contain more people doing complicated things…

16. Why did you choose to write in your particular field or genre?  If you write more than one, how do you balance them?

Mostly I write fantasy, both short stories and novels, but I also write poetry and in fact have done for far longer than I’ve been writing fiction. I also dabble with horror, and erotica (although not usually at the same time!) I write what appeals to me at any given time, what I am in the mood to write. Obviously a novel takes longer than a short story, and there are different audiences, and different skills involved with both. Each have their merits.

17. How long have you been writing?

I assume you mean how long have I been writing to publish? Book I was published in 2012. If you’re asking how long have I been writing stories ans poems I was probably about 7 when I started….

18. What inspires you?  

Everything.

19. How do you find or make time to write?

Hiding from the internet😉. I don’t go out much, I don’t have kids and so I have free time. In between gaming, reading, spending time with my partner and my doggy, and gardening, writing is what I do.

20. What projects are you working on at the present?

Book IV, a couple of short stories, a novella, a fantasy recipe book and a few other bits and pieces.

21. What do your plans for future projects include?

Possibly a roleplay game based on the world of Erana, a fantasy recipe book, at least two more novels, a Roman fantasy book and more anthologies.

Author Bio:

British-born Alexandra Butcher (a/k/a  A. L. Butcher) is an avid reader and creator of worlds, a poet, and a dreamer, a lover of science, natural history, history, and monkeys. Her prose has been described as ‘dark and gritty’ and her poetry as evocative.  She writes with a sure and sometimes erotic sensibility of things that might have been, never were, but could be.

Alex is the author of the Light Beyond the Storm Chronicles and the Tales of Erana lyrical fantasy series. She also has several short stories in the fantasy, fantasy romance genres with occasional forays into gothic style horror. With a background in politics, classical studies, ancient history and myth, her affinities bring an eclectic and unique flavor in her work, mixing reality and dream in alchemical proportions that bring her characters and worlds to life.

Outside the Walls by Diana L Wicker

Her short novella Outside the Walls, co-written with Diana :L Wicker received a Chill With a Book Reader’s Award in 2017.

Social Media links

Amazon Author page http://amzn.to/2hK33OM

Facebook Author Page http://bit.ly/FB2j0bbdZ

Twitter http://bit.ly/Twi2hJZ3h9

Goodreads http://bit.ly/GR2iqokvK

Library of Erana Blog http://bit.ly/Blog2iAWL3o

Linked In https://www.linkedin.com/in/alex-butcher-8342ab13b/

Tumblr https://libraryoferana.tumblr.com

Pinterest https://www.pinterest.co.uk/abmonkey/

Books

The Light Beyond the Storm Chronicles series – an adult fantasy/fantasy romance series, with a touch of erotica.

The Light Beyond the Storm Chronicles – Book I

In a dark world where magic is illegal and elves are enslaved a young elven sorceress runs for her life from the house of her evil Keeper. Pursued by his men and the corrupt Order of Witch-Hunters she must find sanctuary. As the slavers roll across the lands stealing elves from what remains of their ancestral home the Witch-Hunters turn a blind eye to the tragedy and a story of power, love and a terrible revenge unfolds.

(18 rated.)

Audio editions narrated by Rob Goll

Amazon.com http://amzn.to/2bPpspP

Amazon.com audio http://amzn.to/2iBgmQV

Amazon UK http://amzn.to/2i2KJfE

Amazon UK audio http://amzn.to/2iXfIdc

Barnes and Noble http://bit.ly/2iB9PWl

I-books http://apple.co/2j0pYW2

Audible UK http://adbl.co/2bGqZvO

Audible http://adbl.co/2hHT8El

Bundle Rabbit https://bundlerabbit.com/members/ebook/overview/XDOAydON

The Shining Citadel – The Light Beyond the Storm Chronicles – Book II

Who rules in this game of intrigue where magic is forbidden and elves enslaved? Journey where beliefs shatter like glass, truth is unwelcome and monsters from ancient times abound: share the romance and revenge, magic and passion, and the wages of greed in a world of darkest fantasy.

(18 rated)

Now in audio narrated by Shakespearean actor Rob Goll.

Amazon.com http://amzn.to/2c5LghC

Amazon UK http://amzn.to/2iqOXkr

Barnes and Noble http://bit.ly/2hHRv9K

I-books http://apple.co/2j0B4u8

Amazon UK http://amzn.to/2iOOWoB

Audible UK http://adbl.co/2iSW5GF

Amazon.com http://amzn.to/2j1DSnF

Audible.com http://adbl.co/2i3tf5t

https://bundlerabbit.com/members/ebook/overview/1wz3Jw2N

The Stolen Tower – the Light Beyond the Storm Chronicles – Book III

What stalks the land cannot be, but is.

Where magic is outlawed a troll Shaman calls from her deathbed to her heiress, Mirandra Var, daughter of the storm. Mirandra vows to find her missing kin, sort friend from for, and claim the dangerous secrets guarded by unthinkable creatures. If she succeeds she will become the leader of her tribe. If she fails there will be no tribe to lead.

Amazon.com http://amzn.to/2ivJjeL

Amazon UK http://amzn.to/2hKF4Ns

Barnes and Noble http://bit.ly/2hKOZTv

I-books http://apple.co/2iBiA2E

Bundle Rabbit https://bundlerabbit.com/products/detail/stolen-tower

Tales of Erana series

Erana

In a world where magic is illegal, and elves enslaved dare you hear the tales of old? Five tales of myth, magic, and monsters from the world of the Light Beyond the Storm Chronicles.

Audio editions narrated by Michael Legate

Amazon.com http://amzn.to/2j0yyEh

Amazon audio http://amzn.to/2hKoUoZ

Audible.com http://adbl.co/2hKOKHP

Amazon UK http://amzn.to/2j0DJnK

Amazon UK audio http://amzn.to/2iBbmM8

Audible UK http://adbl.co/2bxgVrw

Barnes and Noble http://bit.ly/2i31N56

I -books http://apple.co/2hKO19z

Kobo http://bit.ly/2i2W0MR

Tales of Erana: The Warrior’s Curse.

The Warrior

He who bargains with monsters beware! A hero forges an unholy bargain with a witch and learns magic never forgets.

Audio editions narrated by Rob Goll

Amazon.com http://amzn.to/2hHZKm9

Amazon.com audio http://amzn.to/2hKOk4v

Audible.com http://adbl.co/2buD5qk

Amazon UK http://amzn.to/2j0EZXP

Amazon UK audio http://amzn.to/2i2Woev

Audible UK http://adbl.co/2bGSoi4

Barnes and Noble http://bit.ly/2iBu6er

I-books http://apple.co/2j0GNQz

Kobo http://bit.ly/2ivU4gV

Print

https://www.createspace.com/6358394

https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/1534782052/

Tales of Erana Just one Mistake

Tales of Erana: Just One Mistake

Coel, the bard, thinks his life has taken a turn for the worst, but he hasn’t met the Thiefmaster yet. An ill-conceived notion of earning more money to pay off his debt and escape a dark past leaves the minstrel in a situation he can’t escape and with a deadly bargain. Will he survive his mistake? Who is this mysterious patron?

Amazon.com http://amzn.to/2pQADCj

Amazon.co.uk http://amzn.to/2orn0s9

Smashwords https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/696686

Kobo http://bit.ly/2oMTwdh

Barnes and Noble http://bit.ly/2puZ4WL

Print Editions

Amazon.co.uk https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1546421726/

Amazon.com https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1546421726/

Audio

Amazon audio http://amzn.to/2sp7Hqk

Amazon.co.uk http://amzn.to/2tikBCW

Audible.co.uk http://www.audible.co.uk/pd/Sci-Fi-Fantasy/Tales-of-Erana-Audiobook/B071WXK5D3/

The Fire-Side Tales Collection

KitchenImps cover

The Kitchen Imps and Other Dark Tales – six short tales of mayhem and mischief.

Naughty imps, missing socks, cunning thieves and baffled gods feature in this collection of short fantasy fiction.

Amazon.com http://amzn.to/2l8t7Qq

Amazon.co.uk http://amzn.to/2lSvsn3

Kobo http://bit.ly/2qiJ4tH

Audible.co.uk http://adbl.co/2b8oxRZ

Amazon.com – audio http://amzn.to/2lE6EfM

I-Books http://apple.co/2lihgjs

Audible UK http://adbl.co/2brX3D0

Audible.com http://adbl.co/2mfQPPA

I-tunes http://apple.co/2l8Fg7H

Bundle Rabbit https://bundlerabbit.com/products/detail/kitchen-imps-other-dark-tales

Outside the Walls

Outside the Walls by Diana L Wicker

Co-authored with Diana L. Wicker

(Expanded edition)

When the tide of war flows who will be caught in its wake? A short fantasy tale of a woman’s determination in time of war.

Amazon UK http://amzn.to/2lU4vyN

Amazon.com http://amzn.to/2msdchv

Print edition http://amzn.to/2lUbTKG

Kobo http://bit.ly/2btdiiJ

Smashwords http://bit.ly/2lJwb7p

I books http://apple.co/2lStWRQ

Bundle Rabbit https://bundlerabbit.com/products/detail/outside-walls

Audio – Narrated by Melanie Fraser

Amazon.co.uk audio http://amzn.to/2mtHX53

Amazon.com http://amzn.to/2kUP1vi

Audible.co.uk http://adbl.co/2brX3D0

Audible.com http://adbl.co/2lSzqfn

Of Blood and Scales – in Heroika: Dragon Eaters

The fate of the Kingdom of Ilmar rests on a dying child. Only the truly courageous dare to face the ultimate foe and save the realm.

Amazon.com http://amzn.to/2lRDLPf

Amazon.co.uk http://amzn.to/2lHCrN4

Amazon print UK http://amzn.to/2mpBNnn

Paperback US http://amzn.to/2mwZbhY

Audio – narrated by Rob Goll

Audible UK http://adbl.co/2bnbGu1

Audible.com http://adbl.co/2kXAQp2

Amazon audio http://amzn.to/2mpH6mC

 Shattered Mirror1

Shattered Mirror: A Poetry Collection

Amazon.com http://amzn.to/2mivxAU

Smashwords http://bit.ly/2mpNkmH

https://www.createspace.com/6444126

Bundle Rabbit https://bundlerabbit.com/products/detail/shattered-mirror

Audio

Amazon UK audio  http://amzn.to/2mjUUm1

Amazon.com audio http://amzn.to/2lU6C5u

Audible UK http://adbl.co/2cyCQgQ

Legacy of the Mask Tales

Echoes of a Song

mask in hand.halloween concept

A dozen tumultuous years after the dramatic events at the Paris Opera House Raoul, Comte de Chagny is still haunted by the mysterious Opera Ghost – the creature of legend who held staff at the Opera House under his thrall, kidnapped Raoul’s lover and murdered his brother. In Raoul’s troubled imagination the ghosts of the past are everywhere, and a strange and powerful music still calls in his dreams.

Madness, obsession and the legacy of the past weave their spell in this short, tragic tale based on the Phantom of the Opera.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01M1P25XF

https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B01M1P25XF

Madam Giry finds herself embroiled in the tragedy unfolding at the Opera house; mystery and murder stalk the corridors and, it is said, a ghost haunts the place. Giry knows the truth, for she recalls the caged man she met so many years ago. This is her story, their story.

When murder and mystery begin at the Opera House one woman knows who is behind it, and what really lies beneath the mask. Secrets, lies and tragedy sing a powerful song in this ‘might have been’ tale.

A short, tragic tale based on characters from Phantom of the Opera.

tears-of-crimson-velvet

A Legacy of the Mask Tale.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B073TMFF9M

https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B073TMFF9M

The Watcher – A Jack the Ripper Story

watcher-cover-1

The year is 1888, and the place is Whitechapel, in the very heart of London. But the heart is bleeding. A mysterious killer is stalking women of the streets – his true name is unknown but his legend will go down in history. This is a short tale of Jack the Ripper.

18 rated for scenes of violence.

Amazon UK http://amzn.to/2xdkprc

Amazon.com  http://amzn.to/2v6EUsb

Smashwords  http://bit.ly/2xtps6k

Barnes and Noble http://bit.ly/2v6xDZs

Kobo http://bit.ly/2v6zoG6

https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/the-watcher-a-jack-the-ripper-story/id1273647143?mt=11

Bundle Rabbit https://bundlerabbit.com/products/detail/the-watcher

For anthology pieces please check the author profiles

Writing as Alexa Lynsey

Tales of the Golden Mask – An Initiate’s Tale

Golden Mask

Sultry and sensual adventures to warm your cold winter nights or steam up your long summer days. Set in a fantasy world where nothing is quite what it appears, an old book and a strange golden mask bring power and pleasure.

The first installment in the Tales of the Golden Mask

Adult rated. 18+

Amazon.com http://amzn.to/2jTx530

Amazon.co.uk http://amzn.to/2oKfMRx

Smashwords http://bit.ly/2pwYGti

Barnes and Noble http://bit.ly/2kSCtAK

Kobo http://bit.ly/2oJ0pdG

Print edition – Amazon UK http://amzn.to/2okGYFt

Print edition – Amazon.com http://amzn.to/2pexUGn

Bundle Rabbit https://bundlerabbit.com/products/detail/tales-golden-mask

Goodreads https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/33977537-tales-of-the-golden-mask?from_search=true

Alexa Lynsey walks the paths of fantasy regularly; she enjoys writing sultry fiction and ‘sex and sorcery’ stories and reading a wide variety of fiction and fact. A passionate historian and nature lover she sees beauty and knowledge everywhere. When not writing saucy tales her other self is a poet, fantasy writer and blogger.

Contact email GoldenmaskALBD@gmail.com

Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/Alexalynseyauthor/?ref=bookmarks

Twitter: https://twitter.com/GoldenMask17

I hope you enjoyed getting to know Alex. As you can see she is a prolific author and she has lots of stories to share now and in the future.

 

 

 

Genres of Literature – Poetry


poetry-block-letters_0

Poetry is literary work, which expresses feelings and ideas with special intensity through distinctive style and rhythm. It can be thought of in terms of different genres and sub-genres based on the subject matter, style, or other broader literary characteristics.

Narrative Poetry

The most famous examples include Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales and Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey. Both told stories through epic poetry. However, the term narrative poetry is more often attributed to smaller works with more appeal to human interest. Other narrative poetry is found in Scottish and English ballads and Baltic and Slavic heroic poems, which are performance poetry with roots in preliterate oral tradition. An interesting speculated point here is that the distinguishing features of poetry from prose, which include kennings and alliteration may once have been memory aids for the bards, who recited the traditional tales.

Other notable narrative poets are: Dante, William Langland, Shakespeare, Edgar Allan Poe, Alfred Tennyson and Robert Burns.

Lyric Poetry

Unlike epic and dramatic poetry, lyrical poetry does not tell a story but is more personal in nature. These poems tend to be shorter, melodic and contemplative portraying the poet’s own feelings, perceptions and state of mind rather than depicting characters and actions.

Epic Poetry

This type is a major form of narrative literature. Often defined as lengthy poems regarding events of importance or heroic renown in the culture of the time. In a continuous narrative these poems recount the life and works of heroic or mythological characters. This type of poetry has become less common in the 20th century, although Derek Walcott’s epic, Omeros utilized the style.

Satirical Poetry

Using satire this style of poetry can be a powerful vehicle, often written for political purposes, such as in Roman times by Juvenal or John Dryden, a Tory in England or John Wilmot in the 17th century.

Elegy

The term elegy, originally denoted a type of poetic meter commonly describing a poem of mourning. Elegies are melancholy, mournful and plaintive – a lament for the dead or a funeral song, a reflection on a death or sorrow. However, they can also reflect something the author finds strange or mysterious.

Verse Fable

Fables are an ancient literary genre often set in verse. They are succinct stories featuring anthropomorphized animals, plants, inanimate objects or even forces of nature, which illustrate a moral lesson. (See: https://mandyevebarnett.com/2018/01/08/) Verse fables use a variety of rhyme and meter patterns. The most famous fabulist is Aesop.

Dramatic Poetry

This poetry is drama written in verse, which can be spoken or sung and is found in many cultures, such as Greek tragedy from the 6th century B.C. It may have influenced Sanskirt drama and Indian bianwen verse dramas in China. It is also found in Persian literature.

Speculative Poetry

Also known as fantastic poetry, of which macabre or weird poetry is a major sub-classification, this genre deals thematically with subjects ‘beyond reality’. Through  extrapolation in science or horror fiction, commonly appearing in magazines of those genres.

The ‘father of speculative poetry’ is of course, Edgar Allan Poe, whose Eureka: A Prose Poem anticipated the Big Bang theory.

Prose Poetry

This is a hybrid genre with attributes of prose and poetry. However, it maybe indistinguishable from micro-story as some examples appear to modern readers as poetic, prose poetry originated in 19th century France. It has gained popularity since the late 1980’s with several journal’s devoted to it. 
Light Poetry
Sometimes referred to as light verse as well as light poetry, it attempts to be humorous. These poems are brief and can be either frivolous or serious subject based and often feature word play, including puns, adventurous rhyme or heavy alliteration. English light verse is usually formal incorporated in limerick, clerihew or double dactyl. Although this genre can be thought of as casual it can make a serious point in subtle or subversive ways.
Do you write poetry?
Which style do you write?
Have you read any of these genres?
I read the Iliad and Odyssey in school for my ‘A’ level exam (English school) Greek and Roman Mythology course.