Category Archives: writing journey

Author Interview Kelly Charron


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Schmidt_Charron

  1. Does writing energize or exhaust you?

Usually writing energizes me. I absolutely love it. Even those moments when I’m exhausted from my day job, as soon as I force myself to dig in I’m so happy I did. I love to get lost in the worlds that I’ve created with characters that truly do surprise me.

  1. What is your writing Kryptonite?

If you mean what can deter me from writing, it’s being so tired that I can’t properly focus or having a migraine, which I unfortunately get too often. Creatively, I’m lucky that I don’t really have anything, except on the rare occasion when I’ll get stuck on a plot point (usually unsure where to go next in the story), but it usually means that my character isn’t doing the right thing for the story. I usually talk it through with my amazing writer friends and my husband, who has quickly become the best person to talk through plot with (and he’s not even a writer).

  1. How does having friends who are also authors help you become a better writer?

We keep each other accountable, talk through all of our issues on and off the page, and root for each other. No one else fully understands the highs and lows in this business, so it’s so comforting to have them. We critique each other’s work and have become our own little family over the years. We joke about starting a writing commune.

  1. Do you want each book you write to stand alone, or are you trying to build a body of work with connections between each book?

I have a few series on the go, but all my books share commonalities. I write gritty, dark stories that explore human motivation and how well you really know the people in your life. I have currently two books in The Pretty Wicked series published and I’m writing a YA witch urban fantasy that’s a ton of fun. The Wicked books can be read as stand-alone novels, though they do complement one another and the reader will get the full story arc if they read both. The YA series will be sequential and need to be read in order.

  1. What’s your favorite under-appreciated novel?

I recently read two books that I think people would love but don’t really know about. UNEARTHLY THINGS by Michelle Gagnon and THE SACRED LIES OF MINNOW BLY by Stephanie Oaks. They happen to both be YA books but they will be loved by all if given the chance. Unearthly Things is a modern reimagining of Jane Eyre complete with a creepy, haunted mansion, a misplaced orphan, a turbulent love story and dangerous liaisons. It’s great. The Scared Lies of Minnow Bly was so beautifully and hauntingly written that I was actually angry when it ended. I don’t even want to say anything more as to not ruin it. Go look them up.

  1. How many unpublished and half-finished books do you have?

I have two finished but unpublished novels, one half-finished book, and I’m currently completely replotting and reworking another novel that was complete but I realized was all wrong.

Wicked Fallout

  1. What kind of research do you do, and how long do you spend researching before beginning a book?

I do a ton of research. I read articles and books as well as watch documentaries and movies on the subjects I’m interested in. I’ve even travel and tour places when I’m able. I interview experts in the different fields I’m looking into/studying. I usually do a lot of heavy research before the bulk of my writing starts, but it continues throughout the writing of the book as other things arise.

  1. How many hours a day/week do you write?

Typically, I try and write or research 4-5 days a week anywhere from 1-4 hours per day. I work Mondays to Fridays so I cram in what I can in the evenings and on weekends. I’m also trying to get more reading in because I find it helps my own words flow a bit easier. It’s like a primer.

  1. How do you select the names of your characters?

I often look at baby name websites, though sometimes I look up the meanings of names and their ancestry to make sure it fits the character. I will also jot interesting names down in the notes section on my phone when I hear them. I work at a school with 600 kids, so that also helps.

  1. Why did you choose to write in your particular field or genre?  If you write more than one, how do you balance them?

I’m drawn to certain genres to read and by extension I want to write my own stories and create my own worlds in those genres. For me it’s thriller, horror, and urban fantasy. I love reading and watching some historical but refuse to research that much or I might delve into that. I’d love to write a gothic or Victorian horror—for that I might fall into the research hole.

I balance them by writing one at a time. I have friends that can write anywhere from two to five different books at once. I prefer to get lost in one world from start to finish. I get very focused so the only time I’ll veer off is if I’m editing, then I can split time writing something else.

  1. How long have you been writing?

I think this is year twelve or thirteen. Though I’ve had to take some huge breaks for various degrees I’ve gone back to school for. It’s difficult to keep up on school work and write for me.

  1. Share a link to your author website.

I love to connect with readers and writers. Here’s where you can find me:

Website: http://kellycharron.com

Twitter: https://twitter.com/KellyMCharron

Facebook: https://goo.gl/UNkH3g

Goodreads: https://goo.gl/rf4NlM

Pretty Wicked

13. What is Pretty Wicked about?

Pretty Wicked, is a mature YA novel that follows a fifteen-year-old girl named Ryann Wilkanson who has always known she’s a little different than most people. Early on she recognized that she had a darkness inside of her that she didn’t see in her friends or family members. She becomes obsessed with serial killers who she refers to as “The Greats” and decides that she wants to join their ranks. Lucky for Ryann, her father is a detective and she has made good use of her visits to the station, paying close attention so that she can get away with murder. In this series, Ryann is the protagonist while the detective hunting her, who also happens to be her father’s partner, is the antagonist.

14. What about the sequel, Wicked Fallout?

Wicked Fallout was a natural extension of the first book, though it takes place twelve years later and is classified as an adult novel. I didn’t feel ready to leave the characters and world behind and felt there was a lot more to the story that I wanted to explore including how possible it is for someone to change drastically as they mature, how well can you trust your own judgment and how all of your life’s experiences culminate to inform everything that you do. The book shares a point of view with Dr. Nancy Clafin, a forensic psychiatrist, who is hired by Ryann’s new and formidable defense team to evaluate her to determine if she should be released when new evidence comes to light.

Bio:

Kelly Charron is the author of YA and adult horror, psychological thrillers and urban fantasy novels. All with gritty, murderous inclinations and some moderate amounts of humor. She spends far too much time consuming true crime television (and chocolate) while trying to decide if yes, it was the husband, with the wrench, in the library. Kelly has a degree in English Literature as well as a Social Work degree. She has worked as a hairstylist, youth outreach worker and education assistant. She lives with her husband and cat, Moo Moo, in Vancouver, British Columbia.

 

Author Interview – Simon Rose


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Simon Rose

  1. Does writing energize or exhaust you?

Energize mostly, I think. I can write for very long periods and get a lot of the story down in a single writing session. Of course, at other times as well I can spend hours trying to work something out and at the end of the process have only completed a short paragraph, so it does vary. It can be exhausting at times but I’ve been writing for many hours in the day and well into the night for many years now, so I guess I’ve got used to the fatigue.

  1. What is your writing Kryptonite?

Probably the very complex plots and themes that I include in many of the novels. There always seem to be very intricate issues to resolve as the story takes shape or at the end once the main plot has been completed. It’s my own fault of course since I do tend to write about time travel, parallel universes, alternate realities and that kind of thing. Any of the novels without those elements have usually been written more quickly, if I recall correctly. However, the very complicated storylines are often what I prefer to write, so this particular brand of kryptonite will probably be with me for some time to come.

  1. Did you ever consider writing under a pseudonym?

Not really. I’d probably consider it if I wanted to write and publish in a radically different genre, such as horror, romance, or thrillers for adults, for example, although that can be a tricky proposition if your main genre is books for children and young adults. After all, even if it were supposed to be a secret, the true identity of the author would probably get out somehow. I have written eight guides for aspiring writers that are for adults rather than young readers, but these aren’t under a pseudonym.

  1. What other authors are you friends with, and how do they help you become a better writer?

I’m friends with many authors, both here in Calgary, elsewhere in Canada, and around the world. I’m also the founder of Children’s Writers and Illustrators on Facebook, which now has around 8,000 members. I’m not sure if any of them have influenced my writing, but some of them have been a great help with things such as marketing and promotion, working with ebooks, and self-publishing.

  1. Do you want each book to stand alone, or are you trying to build a body of work with connections between each book?

Some of the published novels have had sequel potential but I was usually too busy with the next project to explore that potential fully. The most recent novels, such as the Flashback series and the Shadowzone series, have been trilogies, and I’ll probably continue in that direction. I’m also working periodically on more adventures in the land of Koronada, which features in The Sphere of Septimus, published in 2014, and two sequels to Future Imperfect, which came out in 2016.

  1. What was the best money you ever spent as a writer?

I would say either the writing course I took years ago with the Institute of Children’s Literature, which started the ball rolling, or Guerrilla Marketing for Writers, a book I bought to learn more about sales and marketing when I first became a published author. The book appeared before self-publishing, ebooks, and social media were well established but at the time it provided invaluable advice.

  1. What was an early experience where you learned that language had power?

That’s an interesting question, but apart from listening to bedtime stories as a child I’d probably have to say comic books, which I read all the time when I was growing up. Although they were of course filled with illustrations, the stories, particularly in Marvel Comics, were so good and often had such elaborate and grandiose themes, often spread over several issues.

  1. What’s your favorite under-appreciated novel?

I wish I had an answer to this one, but I can’t think of a novel that would fit this description, my apologies.

  1. As a writer, what would you choose as your mascot/avatar/spirit animal?

A dog of some kind, I think. I’ve had both dogs and cats throughout my life but have valued dogs as companions for many years and will most likely always have one or more in my life.

  1. How many unpublished and half-finished books do you have?

I don’t have any full finished books that haven’t been published yet and the only partially finished novel is the current work in progress. I do however have many files of varying sizes with reasonably formed story ideas, crammed with notes, ideas, and full or partial outlines, along with other documents containing just a vague story idea and so on.

  1. What does literary success look like to you?

It’s always a great feeling when people enjoy my work and tell me that, especially in person. I’ve met people in their late teens or early twenties that read one or more of my books when they were younger and it’s wonderful to think that I had some kind of an impact on their lives when they were growing up.

  1. What kind of research do you do, and how long do you spend researching before beginning a book?

It depends on the book. For the time travel novels, I’ve had to conduct extensive historical research in the time period in which the story is set. The Sorcerer’s Letterbox involved extensive research into medieval England, the Tower of London, Richard III, the Wars of the Roses, and the mystery of the Princes in the Tower. The Heretic’s Tomb involved research into both the Black Death and medieval medicine. For The Doomsday Mask, I investigated the legend of Atlantis and the many theories about where it might have been located, if it existed. The current novel I’m working on takes place in the turbulent period at the end of the English Civil War in the late 1640s, so at the moment I’m researching that time period and the trial of Charles I. I don’t really research before I begin a historical novel since I have a history degree, so I’m already familiar with most of the historical eras that I’m interested in featuring in stories. However, once the novel is in the process of being written I spend quite a lot of time doing research and making sure that everything is accurate.

  1. How many hours a day/week do you write?

I don’t really keep track but I write all the time so that encompasses much of the day and the week. This isn’t always on novels as I often edit books for other authors, write nonfiction books and articles, create content for the business market for websites, social media and other online locations, and prepare workshops and lesson plans.

  1. How do you select the names of your characters?

For the young characters in the novels, I have a list of names I like that I think would be a good fit for a novel. For adult characters, such as the lead villain of the story, I just seem to be able to think of a name that works.

  1. What was your hardest scene to write?

I can’t think of a particular scene from a novel, but the toughest writing I’ve had to do so far has probably been for the Flashback or Shadowzone books, mainly because the plots were so complicated.

  1. Why did you choose to write in your particular field or genre?  If you write more than one, how do you balance them?

I have many story ideas for adults but the best thing about writing for young adults is that it allows me to write about the kinds of things that used to fascinate me when I was growing up. And of course, the stories can be very imaginative if they’re for younger readers, which makes writing them so much fun. My first novel, The Alchemist’s Portrait, was published in 2003 and I began writing on a serious basis a few years before that. When my children were small, I starting reading children’s books again for the first time in many years. This made me wonder if I could write stories of my own. I started thinking that I should write fairy tales and picture books for younger children but after reading the first three Harry Potter novels, I realized that I wanted to write for the age group that those books are aimed at. I wasn’t interested in writing about the same things, such as magic, wizards, and imaginary creatures, and instead focused on themes that I was interested in, such as science fiction, fantasy, time travel, history, comic books, ancient mysteries and civilizations, superheroes, other dimensions, and the paranormal.

  1. How long have you been writing?

The first novel came out in 2003 and I began writing seriously a few years before that.

  1. What inspires you?  

Ideas can come from anywhere and everywhere. Out walking the dog, in the car, something in a conversation, a newspaper story, a billboard, an item on the evening news, books, historical events, other people’s stories, movies, or something out of the blue. I often find myself wondering ‘what if?’ Sometimes the challenge is to stop having ideas. Some may never be used, but I try to record as many as I can. I never know when they might fit in with a story I’m writing. Even ideas that don’t seem to work right away may provide a spark of inspiration in the future.

  1. How do you find or make time to write?

I don’t have a problem finding time to write since I’ve been doing this full time now for many years. I do struggle to find time to work on my own novels at times, since I’m so busy editing those written by other authors or I’m working on something to do with marketing or a project for a corporate client.

  1. What projects are you working on at the present?

I’ve just published the second part of The Children’s Writer’s Guide, which like the first book provides tips and advice for all authors, not just for those that write for children and young adults. The third part of the Flashback trilogy will be published in the spring and I have a few edits to do for that one. The current novel project is the one about the English Civil War, which I’m hoping to get finished by the end of the summer. I’m also working on several children’s nonfiction books for educational publishers over the coming months.

  1. What do your plans for future projects include?

I have many ideas for future projects and hope to be able to publish all the novels over the next few years.

  1. Share a link to your author website.

You can learn more about me and my work on my website at www.simon-rose.com or online at the following social media sites:

Facebook

Twitter

LinkedIn

YouTube

Google +

Pinterest

Smashwords

Bio:
Simon is a regular presenter at conferences and festivals, and served as a juror for the Governor General’s Literary Awards for Children’s Literature, the Saskatchewan Book Awards, the Parsec Awards and the Sunburst Award for Canadian Literature of the Fantastic. He is the founder of Children’s Authors and Illustrators on Facebook and was the Assistant Regional Advisor for SCBWI Western Canada.  

Apart from  the above, Simon also offers a wide variety of presentations, workshops and author in residence programs for schools and libraries, covering such topics as the writing process, editing and revision, where ideas come from and how writers turn them into stories, character development, historical fiction and historical research, story structure, the publishing world and more. He works as a creative writing instructor throughout the year, is an instructor for adults with the University of Calgary, Mount Royal University and Chinook Learning Services. And offers a variety of online workshops for both children and adults, including editing, writing workshops and coaching, plus copy writing services for the business community.

 

Author Interview – A.L. Butcher


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Please be aware some of Alex’s novels are 18+ rated.

  1. Does writing energize or exhaust you?

Both! I have fibromyalgia so some days I don’t have the energy to do much of any use. I try and write everyday (and don’t always succeed), but some days, if I feel OK I get a total buzz from the writing. It’s satisfying to create something, and the feel-good is worth a lot. On the other hand the non-writing days make me feel a bit rubbish. It does depend on what else I have done that day. I work full time, so writing is usually limited to the evenings, weekends and holidays. I enjoy it though. When it becomes a burden I will stop.

  1. What is your writing Kryptonite?

Gaming and the internet. I am easily distracted. I’ll just go online for half an hour before I write… just 30 minutes…. Who am I kidding?

  1. Did you ever consider writing under a pseudonym?

I have and I do. I have an erotic romance written under the name Alexa Lynsey (which incidentally just won an award from Princess of the Light blog for best Erotic Romance in 2017).  The downside is the promotional aspect. It takes ages to build a following and to start over is hard. That said it has benefits as well – especially for the ‘adult’ genres.

  1. What other authors are you friends with, and how do they help you become a better writer?

Tori Zigler, Barbara Tarn, Joe Bonadonna, Janet Morris, Nickie Storey-Bailey, Diana L Wicker and several others. The indie author scene tends to be supportive. We share networking ideas, we offer advice on books, and promotion. We grumble to each other, and enjoy one anothers successes.

  1. Do you want each book to stand alone, or are you trying to build a body of work with connections between each book?

The Light Beyond the Storm Chronicles series is just that – a series – but each book can be read alone to a degree. It helps to know the world and the past events but the books are still enjoyable as stand alones. The Tales of Erana series are set in the same world but stand alone – there are two novellas and a short story collection. These are the myths and legends, the old tales and the ‘side’ tales.

The Light Beyond the Storm Chronicles Banner

The Kitchen Imps – short stories in one collection so that can be read alone.

The two Legacy of the Mask novellas share a link but can be read alone and in any order.

The Watcher- A Jack the Ripper Story is a standalone.

Outside the Walls is a standalone

  1. What was the best money you ever spent as a writer?

Editing! Various courses to hone the craft.

  1. What was an early experience where you learned that language had power?

That’s hard! I think it was probably the first time I can remember going to the theatre. It was a production of Voyage of the Dawn Treader by CS Lewis. I was spellbound. That inspired a love of theatre, fantasy and storytelling. The tale and its production were amazing and I came out feeling elated. Narnia was a whole new world, in the back of a wardrobe, with the great aspects of appealing characters, a brilliant story and worldbuilding.

  1. What’s your favorite under-appreciated novel?

I’d say either I, the Sun or The Reader of Acheron.

9. As a writer, what would you choose as your mascot/avatar/spirit animal?

A monkey, or a squirrel. I love both animals. Both are crafty, intelligent, and twist themselves in circles.

10. How many unpublished and half-finished books do you have?

Lots! Currently six or seven works in progress and a few other things that may one day be adapted into stories.

11. What does literary success look like to you?

Readers telling me they like the books, asking when the next book is, and making people happy with the stories.

12. What kind of research do you do, and how long do you spend researching before beginning a book?

That depends. I have researched such things as whether a salamander is edible (it is but you probably wouldn’t want to eat it); swamp terrain; poisons; field surgery; the airspeed velocity of a dragon, and what could make it fly. It really depends on what is needed for the work in questions. I do think research is important. Readers aren’t stupid – they will notice if something doesn’t work or is awry. There’s nothing like a screaming great plot or research hole to drop a reader right out of a book. That said it can’t be assumed that readers have the same knowledge of the world (especially a made up world) the author does.

13. How many hours a day/week do you write?

Well… I would like to say I write every single day but it’s not true. I work full time and I have a few health issues which means some days I can’t think straight, let alone string a coherent sentence together. I write several times a week, be it story, review, blog post, interview or poetry. My New Year’s resolution is to write for at least an hour a day – after all I can always delete it.

14. How do you select the names of your characters?

Baby names book, names I like the sound of or fit the characters and misspelled human names.

15. What was your hardest scene to write?

Pretty much any battle scene! Although there were some scenes in book III where a character dies and I blubbed a bit. Oddly sex scenes are much easier. I guess as usually battles contain more people doing complicated things…

16. Why did you choose to write in your particular field or genre?  If you write more than one, how do you balance them?

Mostly I write fantasy, both short stories and novels, but I also write poetry and in fact have done for far longer than I’ve been writing fiction. I also dabble with horror, and erotica (although not usually at the same time!) I write what appeals to me at any given time, what I am in the mood to write. Obviously a novel takes longer than a short story, and there are different audiences, and different skills involved with both. Each have their merits.

17. How long have you been writing?

I assume you mean how long have I been writing to publish? Book I was published in 2012. If you’re asking how long have I been writing stories ans poems I was probably about 7 when I started….

18. What inspires you?  

Everything.

19. How do you find or make time to write?

Hiding from the internet😉. I don’t go out much, I don’t have kids and so I have free time. In between gaming, reading, spending time with my partner and my doggy, and gardening, writing is what I do.

20. What projects are you working on at the present?

Book IV, a couple of short stories, a novella, a fantasy recipe book and a few other bits and pieces.

21. What do your plans for future projects include?

Possibly a roleplay game based on the world of Erana, a fantasy recipe book, at least two more novels, a Roman fantasy book and more anthologies.

Author Bio:

British-born Alexandra Butcher (a/k/a  A. L. Butcher) is an avid reader and creator of worlds, a poet, and a dreamer, a lover of science, natural history, history, and monkeys. Her prose has been described as ‘dark and gritty’ and her poetry as evocative.  She writes with a sure and sometimes erotic sensibility of things that might have been, never were, but could be.

Alex is the author of the Light Beyond the Storm Chronicles and the Tales of Erana lyrical fantasy series. She also has several short stories in the fantasy, fantasy romance genres with occasional forays into gothic style horror. With a background in politics, classical studies, ancient history and myth, her affinities bring an eclectic and unique flavor in her work, mixing reality and dream in alchemical proportions that bring her characters and worlds to life.

Outside the Walls by Diana L Wicker

Her short novella Outside the Walls, co-written with Diana :L Wicker received a Chill With a Book Reader’s Award in 2017.

Social Media links

Amazon Author page http://amzn.to/2hK33OM

Facebook Author Page http://bit.ly/FB2j0bbdZ

Twitter http://bit.ly/Twi2hJZ3h9

Goodreads http://bit.ly/GR2iqokvK

Library of Erana Blog http://bit.ly/Blog2iAWL3o

Linked In https://www.linkedin.com/in/alex-butcher-8342ab13b/

Tumblr https://libraryoferana.tumblr.com

Pinterest https://www.pinterest.co.uk/abmonkey/

Books

The Light Beyond the Storm Chronicles series – an adult fantasy/fantasy romance series, with a touch of erotica.

The Light Beyond the Storm Chronicles – Book I

In a dark world where magic is illegal and elves are enslaved a young elven sorceress runs for her life from the house of her evil Keeper. Pursued by his men and the corrupt Order of Witch-Hunters she must find sanctuary. As the slavers roll across the lands stealing elves from what remains of their ancestral home the Witch-Hunters turn a blind eye to the tragedy and a story of power, love and a terrible revenge unfolds.

(18 rated.)

Audio editions narrated by Rob Goll

Amazon.com http://amzn.to/2bPpspP

Amazon.com audio http://amzn.to/2iBgmQV

Amazon UK http://amzn.to/2i2KJfE

Amazon UK audio http://amzn.to/2iXfIdc

Barnes and Noble http://bit.ly/2iB9PWl

I-books http://apple.co/2j0pYW2

Audible UK http://adbl.co/2bGqZvO

Audible http://adbl.co/2hHT8El

Bundle Rabbit https://bundlerabbit.com/members/ebook/overview/XDOAydON

The Shining Citadel – The Light Beyond the Storm Chronicles – Book II

Who rules in this game of intrigue where magic is forbidden and elves enslaved? Journey where beliefs shatter like glass, truth is unwelcome and monsters from ancient times abound: share the romance and revenge, magic and passion, and the wages of greed in a world of darkest fantasy.

(18 rated)

Now in audio narrated by Shakespearean actor Rob Goll.

Amazon.com http://amzn.to/2c5LghC

Amazon UK http://amzn.to/2iqOXkr

Barnes and Noble http://bit.ly/2hHRv9K

I-books http://apple.co/2j0B4u8

Amazon UK http://amzn.to/2iOOWoB

Audible UK http://adbl.co/2iSW5GF

Amazon.com http://amzn.to/2j1DSnF

Audible.com http://adbl.co/2i3tf5t

https://bundlerabbit.com/members/ebook/overview/1wz3Jw2N

The Stolen Tower – the Light Beyond the Storm Chronicles – Book III

What stalks the land cannot be, but is.

Where magic is outlawed a troll Shaman calls from her deathbed to her heiress, Mirandra Var, daughter of the storm. Mirandra vows to find her missing kin, sort friend from for, and claim the dangerous secrets guarded by unthinkable creatures. If she succeeds she will become the leader of her tribe. If she fails there will be no tribe to lead.

Amazon.com http://amzn.to/2ivJjeL

Amazon UK http://amzn.to/2hKF4Ns

Barnes and Noble http://bit.ly/2hKOZTv

I-books http://apple.co/2iBiA2E

Bundle Rabbit https://bundlerabbit.com/products/detail/stolen-tower

Tales of Erana series

Erana

In a world where magic is illegal, and elves enslaved dare you hear the tales of old? Five tales of myth, magic, and monsters from the world of the Light Beyond the Storm Chronicles.

Audio editions narrated by Michael Legate

Amazon.com http://amzn.to/2j0yyEh

Amazon audio http://amzn.to/2hKoUoZ

Audible.com http://adbl.co/2hKOKHP

Amazon UK http://amzn.to/2j0DJnK

Amazon UK audio http://amzn.to/2iBbmM8

Audible UK http://adbl.co/2bxgVrw

Barnes and Noble http://bit.ly/2i31N56

I -books http://apple.co/2hKO19z

Kobo http://bit.ly/2i2W0MR

Tales of Erana: The Warrior’s Curse.

The Warrior

He who bargains with monsters beware! A hero forges an unholy bargain with a witch and learns magic never forgets.

Audio editions narrated by Rob Goll

Amazon.com http://amzn.to/2hHZKm9

Amazon.com audio http://amzn.to/2hKOk4v

Audible.com http://adbl.co/2buD5qk

Amazon UK http://amzn.to/2j0EZXP

Amazon UK audio http://amzn.to/2i2Woev

Audible UK http://adbl.co/2bGSoi4

Barnes and Noble http://bit.ly/2iBu6er

I-books http://apple.co/2j0GNQz

Kobo http://bit.ly/2ivU4gV

Print

https://www.createspace.com/6358394

https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/1534782052/

Tales of Erana Just one Mistake

Tales of Erana: Just One Mistake

Coel, the bard, thinks his life has taken a turn for the worst, but he hasn’t met the Thiefmaster yet. An ill-conceived notion of earning more money to pay off his debt and escape a dark past leaves the minstrel in a situation he can’t escape and with a deadly bargain. Will he survive his mistake? Who is this mysterious patron?

Amazon.com http://amzn.to/2pQADCj

Amazon.co.uk http://amzn.to/2orn0s9

Smashwords https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/696686

Kobo http://bit.ly/2oMTwdh

Barnes and Noble http://bit.ly/2puZ4WL

Print Editions

Amazon.co.uk https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1546421726/

Amazon.com https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1546421726/

Audio

Amazon audio http://amzn.to/2sp7Hqk

Amazon.co.uk http://amzn.to/2tikBCW

Audible.co.uk http://www.audible.co.uk/pd/Sci-Fi-Fantasy/Tales-of-Erana-Audiobook/B071WXK5D3/

The Fire-Side Tales Collection

KitchenImps cover

The Kitchen Imps and Other Dark Tales – six short tales of mayhem and mischief.

Naughty imps, missing socks, cunning thieves and baffled gods feature in this collection of short fantasy fiction.

Amazon.com http://amzn.to/2l8t7Qq

Amazon.co.uk http://amzn.to/2lSvsn3

Kobo http://bit.ly/2qiJ4tH

Audible.co.uk http://adbl.co/2b8oxRZ

Amazon.com – audio http://amzn.to/2lE6EfM

I-Books http://apple.co/2lihgjs

Audible UK http://adbl.co/2brX3D0

Audible.com http://adbl.co/2mfQPPA

I-tunes http://apple.co/2l8Fg7H

Bundle Rabbit https://bundlerabbit.com/products/detail/kitchen-imps-other-dark-tales

Outside the Walls

Outside the Walls by Diana L Wicker

Co-authored with Diana L. Wicker

(Expanded edition)

When the tide of war flows who will be caught in its wake? A short fantasy tale of a woman’s determination in time of war.

Amazon UK http://amzn.to/2lU4vyN

Amazon.com http://amzn.to/2msdchv

Print edition http://amzn.to/2lUbTKG

Kobo http://bit.ly/2btdiiJ

Smashwords http://bit.ly/2lJwb7p

I books http://apple.co/2lStWRQ

Bundle Rabbit https://bundlerabbit.com/products/detail/outside-walls

Audio – Narrated by Melanie Fraser

Amazon.co.uk audio http://amzn.to/2mtHX53

Amazon.com http://amzn.to/2kUP1vi

Audible.co.uk http://adbl.co/2brX3D0

Audible.com http://adbl.co/2lSzqfn

Of Blood and Scales – in Heroika: Dragon Eaters

The fate of the Kingdom of Ilmar rests on a dying child. Only the truly courageous dare to face the ultimate foe and save the realm.

Amazon.com http://amzn.to/2lRDLPf

Amazon.co.uk http://amzn.to/2lHCrN4

Amazon print UK http://amzn.to/2mpBNnn

Paperback US http://amzn.to/2mwZbhY

Audio – narrated by Rob Goll

Audible UK http://adbl.co/2bnbGu1

Audible.com http://adbl.co/2kXAQp2

Amazon audio http://amzn.to/2mpH6mC

 Shattered Mirror1

Shattered Mirror: A Poetry Collection

Amazon.com http://amzn.to/2mivxAU

Smashwords http://bit.ly/2mpNkmH

https://www.createspace.com/6444126

Bundle Rabbit https://bundlerabbit.com/products/detail/shattered-mirror

Audio

Amazon UK audio  http://amzn.to/2mjUUm1

Amazon.com audio http://amzn.to/2lU6C5u

Audible UK http://adbl.co/2cyCQgQ

Legacy of the Mask Tales

Echoes of a Song

mask in hand.halloween concept

A dozen tumultuous years after the dramatic events at the Paris Opera House Raoul, Comte de Chagny is still haunted by the mysterious Opera Ghost – the creature of legend who held staff at the Opera House under his thrall, kidnapped Raoul’s lover and murdered his brother. In Raoul’s troubled imagination the ghosts of the past are everywhere, and a strange and powerful music still calls in his dreams.

Madness, obsession and the legacy of the past weave their spell in this short, tragic tale based on the Phantom of the Opera.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01M1P25XF

https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B01M1P25XF

Madam Giry finds herself embroiled in the tragedy unfolding at the Opera house; mystery and murder stalk the corridors and, it is said, a ghost haunts the place. Giry knows the truth, for she recalls the caged man she met so many years ago. This is her story, their story.

When murder and mystery begin at the Opera House one woman knows who is behind it, and what really lies beneath the mask. Secrets, lies and tragedy sing a powerful song in this ‘might have been’ tale.

A short, tragic tale based on characters from Phantom of the Opera.

tears-of-crimson-velvet

A Legacy of the Mask Tale.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B073TMFF9M

https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B073TMFF9M

The Watcher – A Jack the Ripper Story

watcher-cover-1

The year is 1888, and the place is Whitechapel, in the very heart of London. But the heart is bleeding. A mysterious killer is stalking women of the streets – his true name is unknown but his legend will go down in history. This is a short tale of Jack the Ripper.

18 rated for scenes of violence.

Amazon UK http://amzn.to/2xdkprc

Amazon.com  http://amzn.to/2v6EUsb

Smashwords  http://bit.ly/2xtps6k

Barnes and Noble http://bit.ly/2v6xDZs

Kobo http://bit.ly/2v6zoG6

https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/the-watcher-a-jack-the-ripper-story/id1273647143?mt=11

Bundle Rabbit https://bundlerabbit.com/products/detail/the-watcher

For anthology pieces please check the author profiles

Writing as Alexa Lynsey

Tales of the Golden Mask – An Initiate’s Tale

Golden Mask

Sultry and sensual adventures to warm your cold winter nights or steam up your long summer days. Set in a fantasy world where nothing is quite what it appears, an old book and a strange golden mask bring power and pleasure.

The first installment in the Tales of the Golden Mask

Adult rated. 18+

Amazon.com http://amzn.to/2jTx530

Amazon.co.uk http://amzn.to/2oKfMRx

Smashwords http://bit.ly/2pwYGti

Barnes and Noble http://bit.ly/2kSCtAK

Kobo http://bit.ly/2oJ0pdG

Print edition – Amazon UK http://amzn.to/2okGYFt

Print edition – Amazon.com http://amzn.to/2pexUGn

Bundle Rabbit https://bundlerabbit.com/products/detail/tales-golden-mask

Goodreads https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/33977537-tales-of-the-golden-mask?from_search=true

Alexa Lynsey walks the paths of fantasy regularly; she enjoys writing sultry fiction and ‘sex and sorcery’ stories and reading a wide variety of fiction and fact. A passionate historian and nature lover she sees beauty and knowledge everywhere. When not writing saucy tales her other self is a poet, fantasy writer and blogger.

Contact email GoldenmaskALBD@gmail.com

Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/Alexalynseyauthor/?ref=bookmarks

Twitter: https://twitter.com/GoldenMask17

I hope you enjoyed getting to know Alex. As you can see she is a prolific author and she has lots of stories to share now and in the future.

 

 

 

Author Interview – K.D. Rose Completed Interview


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K.D. was able to complete the interview and I am so pleased. Please join me in getting to know her.

KD Rose

  1. Does writing energize or exhaust you?

It exhausts me! But thinking up what I’m going to write about energizes me.

  1. What is your writing Kryptonite?

Health issues.  😦

  1. Did you ever consider writing under a pseudonym?

I do write under a pen name. K.D. Rose is my real initials coupled with my family name on my mother’s side. So all my relatives are actually Rose’s on that side! It’s not my married name though. All my books and literary publications are under my Rose name.

  1. What other authors are you friends with, and how do they help you become a better writer?

I have been friends with a number of authors and how close they are and how much we help each other is invaluable. Because my health changes, how close I can stay changes too, which is unfortunate but it is wonderful when you can root for people and they root for you.

  1. Do you want each book to stand alone, or are you trying to build a body of work with connections between each book?

I focus completely on literary publications now. In fact I was nominated for a Pushcart Prize. My body of books are still there but they run the gamet. I do have another book ready to go when I am able.

  1. What was the best money you ever spent as a writer?

I had a mentorship with a poet that I contacted when I found him in the Poets Market Book. That was a wonderful relationship and feedback with new ideas.

  1. What was an early experience where you learned that language had power?

When I wrote a smart alecky note to my teacher in elementary school. We were supposed to be writing apologies. I didn’t feel Iike I had done anything wrong. I got hauled out of class into the hallway for a talking to!

  1. What’s your favorite under-appreciated novel?

All of Philip K. Dicks works. He was a master science fiction writer. Also Harlan Ellison.  They are both famous but not as much as they should be.

  1. As a writer, what would you choose as your mascot/avatar/spirit animal?

I’m in love with cats so it would be some kind of cat. Probably a black panther.

  1. How many unpublished and half-finished books do you have?

About two in the works.  But lots of literary works too.

  1. What does literary success look like to you?

I’d like  to win a few pushcart prizes. That would be successful to me. Then win another type of prestigious prize as well.

  1. What kind of research do you do, and how long do you spend researching before beginning a book?

My writing doesn’t usually require too much so I research things here and there, in deep once in a while. Mostly its superficial things though.

  1. How many hours a day/week do you write?

When I am well, I write 6 to 8 hours a day.  But then lots of time will go by where I can’t at all.

  1. How do you select the names of your characters?

I based one book on the first names of family. I and they thought that was fun.  Other than that, I usually pick a name that I feel fits the personality.

  1. What was your hardest scene to write?

I had to write a sex scene because the publisher wanted it and had no idea how to!   I just don’t write those.

  1. Why did you choose to write in your particular field or genre?  If you write more than one, how do you balance them?

I balanced by trying them out but poetry always remained my speciality. Now it is essays and literary publishing in journals.  I have a number of fiction books out though.

  1. How long have you been writing?

Since I was in my teens. It has always been an inspiration for me.

  1. What inspires you?  

I love it when ideas come either out of the blue or from something I am seeing or experiencing at the time. That gives me a rush.

  1. How do you find or make time to write?

I am lucky in that I have a library set up just for that. It beckons me. So making the time is just balancing writing and health usually.

  1. What projects are you working on at the present?

I have an essay that I am in the middle of.  I received good feedback on it and need to incorporate the feedback to rewrite.

  1. What do your plans for future projects include?

I have a book I am probably going to self- publish.  I haven’t published in awhile and the companies I was publishing with went out of business.   My other future projects are all essays for submission to literary journals.

  1. Share a link to your author website.

Here it is! https://authorkdrose.net/

In the meantime here is her website to give you a taste.

https://authorkdrose.net/

 

Bio:

K. D. Rose is a poet and author. K.D received a Pushcart Prize nomination for her poem: There are Species of Stars that Have Yet to be Seen. K. D.’s book, Inside Sorrow, won Readers Favorite Silver Medal for Poetry. Her poetry, essays, and short stories have been published in Word Riot, Chicago Literati, Poetry Breakfast, BlazeVOX Journal, Ink in Thirds, Northern Virginia Review, The Nuclear Impact Anthology, Stray Branch Magazine, Literary Orphans, Maintenant Contemporary Dada Magazine, Lunch Ticket Arts and Literary Magazine, The 2016 Paragram Press Anthology, Eastern Iowa Review, Bop Dead City, Santa Fe Literary Magazine, Hermes Poetry Magazine, Slipstream, Wild Women’s Medicine Circle Journal and The Offbeat Literary Magazine. She also won an Honorable Mention in the 2016 New Millennium Writings Poetry Contest. Her last release was Brevity of Twit. She has a B.S. in Psychology and a Master’s Degree in Social Work. Member: Poetry Society of America. Member: Poets and Writers. Member: Academy of American Poets.

 

Writing Prompt Wednesday


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As a kid, what job did you dream you would have as an adult?

My first recollection of wanting  any particular ‘job’ was in secondary school (UK 11 – 16). I was art mad and spent all my lunch hours in the art room creating. Luckily my art teacher, Miss Randall was very supportive and allowed me access to all the art supplies (and some non art supplies, one of which was the large noticeboard from the main corridor!) With free rein I created to my heart’s content, I utilized not just the usual paint, clay, paper etc. but the internal workings of clocks, cellophane, paper mache, wire and a lot more.

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I dreamed of designing house interiors, some alternative, some not. I even planned to use my summer vacations to dress shop windows in London high street stores. My art teacher, Miss Randall actually sent some of my artwork to the Royal College of Art. I was accepted until she advised them I was only 12!

Alas my dream did not materialize but I have experienced many forms of art through the years and now have found my niche – writing. I sometimes wonder how my life would look now if I have followed that path. Maybe my parallel self is enjoying that designing life – who knows?

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Incidentally I did watch a fantastic Netflix documentary, Abstract some time ago which highlighted designers and one just blew me away. I watched and thought that Ilse Crawford: Interior Designer had my parallel life. Maybe next time round I will go that route.

What job did you dream of having as a child?

Why not share in the comments?